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Why is the Education system anti male? Watch

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    Girls do better at something = they must just be better
    Boys do better at something = discriminatory patriarchal society
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    Not anti-male per se, but it's based on conforming, being submissive while discouraging competition and individuality (everyone gets a medal so nobody's feelings get hurt). Obviously all of these things hinder testosterone driven men who are much less likely to thrive in a controlled and anesthetized environment.
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    (Original post by StevieA)
    Not anti-male per se, but it's based on conforming, being submissive while discouraging competition and individuality (everyone gets a medal so nobody's feelings get hurt).
    you know, I hear a lot about this sort of thing but I have never actually encountered a single example of it in practice. Really doesn't sound a thing like my GCSE and A level experiences, in what way do they actually discourage competition or individuality? And the hell is that about being submissive, I am not sure how that or the opposite comes into education at all.
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    Look dude I'm begging you; please justify these threads. All you and those like you accomplish is making people angry whether it's because they think you're points are idiotic or agree and are enraged by them. Seriously what is the point? You don't want an educational debate, you want to preach. If you want something changed why don't you campaign for change instead of *****ing on the internet? Whether the feminists are right or not at least they're campaigning to get what they want. What are you doing? Sitting behind a computer screen. Well you know what, complain all you like but you sir, are letting these so called injustices happen.
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    (Original post by Emaemmaemily)
    Personally I actually think it's more even now (although perhaps it could be slightly more even than it currently is, too).
    If boys are supposed to be better at controlled assessments (exams), and girls are supposed to be better at coursework (all generally speaking), then surely the right approach is to have the system ensure that children are tested pretty evenly between the two methods?

    Having said all of that, as another user has said, if the student puts all of their effort in they will get the grades. If you revise properly, then you will do well in exams; likewise if you do your research and put as much effort as possible in your coursework you will get top results.
    This is assuming the children have actually been taught the information properly in the first place, of course, but if they haven't then both sets of genders are at the same disadvantage.
    No. Absolutely not.

    It should never be a case of 'let's change the assessment so that all groups achieve equally'.

    It should absolutely be the case of 'let's change the assessment so it is the most useful for displaying competence in the subject and for determining merit for the next stage of education'. What different groups achieve, whether racial, gender, or orientation, simply should not be a factor.

    If it is objectively determined via a mass sample longitudinal study that 100% coursework, for example, is most effective at the above, then that should be implemented. Tough luck for the boys if they don't have the requisite skills to cope with that. And vice versa if it's determined 100% exams is better.
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    always hated school myself
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    (Original post by imtelling)
    the education system has been fundamentally transformed and is now completely biased against males and their style of learning.....
    Your argument rests on this claim yet you don't think to provide an example or even a brief explanation of this anti-male transformation? Two pages have gone by yet everyone is unsure what the actual anti-male situation is. I'm not saying you're wrong or right, but I think it's unclear what the debate is here.
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    (Original post by ClickItBack)
    No. Absolutely not.

    It should never be a case of 'let's change the assessment so that all groups achieve equally'.

    It should absolutely be the case of 'let's change the assessment so it is the most useful for displaying competence in the subject and for determining merit for the next stage of education'. What different groups achieve, whether racial, gender, or orientation, simply should not be a factor.

    If it is objectively determined via a mass sample longitudinal study that 100% coursework, for example, is most effective at the above, then that should be implemented. Tough luck for the boys if they don't have the requisite skills to cope with that. And vice versa if it's determined 100% exams is better.
    I think you've misunderstood me, or perhaps I haven't explained myself properly.
    I was merely trying to show that the current system certainly isn't "anti-boy", seeing as it has a fairly equal balance between the two methods, and if anything actually still leans more towards exams rather than coursework as the main method of testing.

    You could argue that having an equal amount of several different testing methods, you are far more likely to get a balanced view of what a student has learnt. This also means that you are testing their ability to cope in several different situations and testing methods, so that those who can adapt, work hard and do well in all of them achieve the best results.
    Having just exams means that you are only testing a student's ability to memorise specific facts and answer specific questions. Having just coursework means that a student's ability to remember and answer under pressure isn't tested at all, although a different set of skills are tested. A good mix of the both, depending on the subject of course, means that you are testing them more evenly over different sets of skills which are all important.

    But yes, I am mostly agreeing with you. In some subjects there really isn't much scope for coursework to help in any way (namely subjects like maths), and so they should be tested in the way that suits the subject best.
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    (Original post by Emaemmaemily)
    I think you've misunderstood me, or perhaps I haven't explained myself properly.
    I was merely trying to show that the current system certainly isn't "anti-boy", seeing as it has a fairly equal balance between the two methods, and if anything actually still leans more towards exams rather than coursework as the main method of testing.

    You could argue that having an equal amount of several different testing methods, you are far more likely to get a balanced view of what a student has learnt. This also means that you are testing their ability to cope in several different situations and testing methods, so that those who can adapt, work hard and do well in all of them achieve the best results.
    Having just exams means that you are only testing a student's ability to memorise specific facts and answer specific questions. Having just coursework means that a student's ability to remember and answer under pressure isn't tested at all, although a different set of skills are tested. A good mix of the both, depending on the subject of course, means that you are testing them more evenly over different sets of skills which are all important.

    But yes, I am mostly agreeing with you. In some subjects there really isn't much scope for coursework to help in any way (namely subjects like maths), and so they should be tested in the way that suits the subject best.
    I certainly agree with what you've said in this post, but it wasn't what you said in the previous post - you explicitly determined the validity of assessment by its impact on the genders. But it seems like you didn't quite mean it that way .

    I do agree the current system is not particularly anti-male; it is, however, probably more anti-male than it was 30 years ago, but as you and I agree, this is not necessarily a bad thing.
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    It tries to 'encourage' girls more now in many aspects, which is now very unfair to boys. Where is the equality in this?

    However, at the same time - even though the girls may seem to be doing better now, due to the 'dumbing down' of exams and assessments, they still cannot be compared to the previous generation that went before them.
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    I agree. My girlfriend is smarter than me but she got a third in an exam when I got a first. Totally unfair. She's like Einstein and I'm like Hagrid.


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    Mostly for the same reason that current feminism builds women up by bringing men down. For the last decade the media has circulated this 'girls are doing better academically! More women graduating! Boys are getting left behind, you go girls, I ain't dating no scrubs!' dialogue, same as all the lame dad jokes in sitcoms, the easiest way to create fenale empowerment is by socking it to the lads. This is at the same time as the residue of internalised misogyny: bous should suck it up if they're struggling, a man without a good job is worthless, etc. Result? Men's self esteem is lowering which then lowers motivation. It's getting better bit it's noticeable on a subtle level, bot so much by the teachers or exam boards as the press. I guess it's balanced by the ****ty prejudices against women in STEM.
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    (Original post by maskofsanity)
    Your argument rests on this claim yet you don't think to provide an example or even a brief explanation of this anti-male transformation? Two pages have gone by yet everyone is unsure what the actual anti-male situation is. I'm not saying you're wrong or right, but I think it's unclear what the debate is here.

    C&P from Google
    "HOW EXAMS ARE FIXED IN FAVOUR OF GIRLs "

    "Girls are doing better than boys in exams, but that does not mean that
    they are brighter, says Madsen Pine. What has happened is that exams have been feminised"
    http://archive.spectator.co.uk/artic...avour-of-girls


    I assume this is the sort of thing the OP is referring to.
    True or not, I don't know.

    On a personal level my daughter studied WW2 last year. The three subjects they had to read up on, set by their female teacher was
    1 Female spies
    2 Women's experiences on the home front.
    3 Female pilots.



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    Oh God - ADHD does flipping exist!!!! You are not an educational psychologist.

    It's not 'boys being boys', girls can have it to and require specialist attention to fulfill their potential.


    Some uncalled for feminist bashing too. Teachers are there to teach, doesn't matter to them weather they are teaching girls or boys.
 
 
 
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