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Canadian student, interested in GEM in UK Watch

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    (Original post by popeyespinach)
    Oh I see! My high school grades were okay (Top 6 4U courses, which is what I think they want for Canadian applicants, was ~89%). Also, I think the tuition for us would be so much more, probably around ~21k pounds a year. Still, at the moment, I am not considering the cost as a factor. Thank you for your reply

    I'll definitely look into Edinburgh, although I have heard international students that graduate from there have a harder time matching into postgrad in the UK. Not sure though. And I am really hopeful that my GPA is considered 1st or upper 2nd (also, what might be the equivalent of ~84% overall in undergrad)?

    Yep! I was saying I may get access to a line of credit of 200k dollars. Sorry for the confusion

    Hmmm, it does seem like I'll have to do the UKCAT/GAMSAT and/or BMAT, if I do consider the UK (which I really am). I am looking around the web and most sources are saying that there is no way to study for the UKCAT. Is this true? Apparently it tests your "innate abilities".

    Hey thanks for the reply! I am consider the ABP to Ireland although I have heard that it's really tough to match for a residency in Ireland after graduation. I actually read somewhere (trying to find that source) that recently there were some new immigration laws which allow non-EU graduates of UK medical schools to be considered on equal footing as EU grads of UK medical schools, when applying for foundation programs/residencies, after medical school. This is one of the main reasons I am hoping to go to a UK med school. Would you know if Ireland has a similar system?
    Like Ronove said, your medical school is 100% blinded when it comes to foundation applications and whoever told you that Edinburgh internationals have trouble getting post-grad has it wrong. There should be no difference and if there was it is likely they do better than the average.

    To the best of my knowledge Ireland doesn't have that system. If you aren't an EU grad you will have trouble getting internship or residency.
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    (Original post by ukmed108)
    Like Ronove said, your medical school is 100% blinded when it comes to foundation applications and whoever told you that Edinburgh internationals have trouble getting post-grad has it wrong. There should be no difference and if there was it is likely they do better than the average.

    To the best of my knowledge Ireland doesn't have that system. If you aren't an EU grad you will have trouble getting internship or residency.
    Yeah, that's precisely why I am consider UK schools over ABP in Ireland. Even location wise, I want to settle down in UK over Ireland. i did some web searching and looks like it's Tier 4 visas throughout med school, Tier 2 once you are in foundation, and then after 5 years, one can apply for Indefinite Leave to Remain. So ya, definitely UK schools as priority right now. It's a bit disadvantageous for me because I have a ton of EC's but because I studied math in ugrad, they were primarily non-clinical. Now it's a matter of racking up hospital volunteering hours and shadowing. Is there any other type of clinical volunteering that would be seen as advantageous? Or volunteering in general?
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    (Original post by popeyespinach)
    Yeah, that's precisely why I am consider UK schools over ABP in Ireland. Even location wise, I want to settle down in UK over Ireland. i did some web searching and looks like it's Tier 4 visas throughout med school, Tier 2 once you are in foundation, and then after 5 years, one can apply for Indefinite Leave to Remain. So ya, definitely UK schools as priority right now. It's a bit disadvantageous for me because I have a ton of EC's but because I studied math in ugrad, they were primarily non-clinical. Now it's a matter of racking up hospital volunteering hours and shadowing. Is there any other type of clinical volunteering that would be seen as advantageous? Or volunteering in general?
    Its actually tier 4 in med school tier 4 in foundation and tier 2 in speciality training. Then after 5 years u apply for permanent residency.

    No not really, they just want to see some clinical volunteering (not gift shop) anything with seniors care is good, first aid is good, shadowing is good.

    Another thing about foundation is that every UK med school grad is basically guaranteed a foundation spot.
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    (Original post by EcstaZEEH)
    I see your point, I did apply for Oxford and sadly was rejected post-interview, I believe that the Foundation Programme is a point-based application (based on qualification like intercalated BSc / Undergrad Masters, etc.) I was referring to the intercalated programmes that can boost your application. I know your university won't have anything to do with it, since almost all of the universities that offer GEM is in Russell group anyway.
    There is no intercalation within GEM. The points awarded for an intercalated degree are the same regardless of which intercalated degree it is anyway (as long as we're not saying Masters vs Bachelors here), the points awarded depend on classification awarded. I'm fairly sure most if not all med schools offer the opportunity to intercalate (though again, not if you're doing GEM).

    (Original post by EcstaZEEH)
    You can prepare for it like timing and all, but other than that, no - it is an aptitude test anyway.
    As I have already said, this is nonsense.

    I've also seen your post about dropping out of Uni and applying for Med school? I would like to wish you the best of like with that as well.
    Thanks, it is a work in progress.
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    This is awesome! I am really grateful for all of these replies; they're super insightful.

    (Original post by ukmed108)
    Its actually tier 4 in med school tier 4 in foundation and tier 2 in speciality training. Then after 5 years u apply for permanent residency.

    No not really, they just want to see some clinical volunteering (not gift shop) anything with seniors care is good, first aid is good, shadowing is good.

    Another thing about foundation is that every UK med school grad is basically guaranteed a foundation spot.
    Thanks for clearing that up. So it's 4-6 medical school + 2 years foundation + specialty training? I am just trying to see how it varies from North American training which is 4 years meds + 3-4 years residency + 4 or more years subspecialities
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    (Original post by popeyespinach)
    This is awesome! I am really grateful for all of these replies; they're super insightful.



    Thanks for clearing that up. So it's 4-6 medical school + 2 years foundation + specialty training? I am just trying to see how it varies from North American training which is 4 years meds + 3-4 years residency + 4 or more years subspecialities
    Yup. Except there aren't any subspecialties that last 4 years in the US. The most are usually 3 and a lot are 1-2 years. Residency can go up to 6 usually.
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    (Original post by Ronove)
    There is no intercalation within GEM. The points awarded for an intercalated degree are the same regardless of which intercalated degree it is anyway (as long as we're not saying Masters vs Bachelors here), the points awarded depend on classification awarded. I'm fairly sure most if not all med schools offer the opportunity to intercalate (though again, not if you're doing GEM).


    As I have already said, this is nonsense.


    Thanks, it is a work in progress.
    What was your degree before and why did you drop out? - if you don't mind me asking
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    (Original post by EcstaZEEH)
    What was your degree before and why did you drop out? - if you don't mind me asking
    It was a languages degree and I switched to Single Honours during my year abroad so as to be able to stay in the country I went to first for the whole year, because at first it seemed promising and I had a well-paying job and so on. Then I had got ill amongst other things and started having a very much less pleasant time and by the time I had finished the year I was a) still not feeling very well and b) not particularly enthused about the prospect of only studying the language of the place I had just had a horrible time in. I also met my other half just before I was due to go back and decided my relationship with him was worth pursuing over going back immediately (I initially took a year off, but then decided to withdraw completely).
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    (Original post by ukmed108)
    Yup. Except there aren't any subspecialties that last 4 years in the US. The most are usually 3 and a lot are 1-2 years. Residency can go up to 6 usually.
    Yea thanks for clearing that up! This is a very helpful discussion
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    (Original post by Ronove)
    It was a languages degree and I switched to Single Honours during my year abroad so as to be able to stay in the country I went to first for the whole year, because at first it seemed promising and I had a well-paying job and so on. Then I had got ill amongst other things and started having a very much less pleasant time and by the time I had finished the year I was a) still not feeling very well and b) not particularly enthused about the prospect of only studying the language of the place I had just had a horrible time in. I also met my other half just before I was due to go back and decided my relationship with him was worth pursuing over going back immediately (I initially took a year off, but then decided to withdraw completely).
    Wow! If I were you, I'll drop out as well. That was too much to take in a short span of time.

    I love the love story, by the way. which universities are you planning to go for, you're applying for the A100 (5 year programme) right?

    When are you taking the UKCAT/BMAT?
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    (Original post by EcstaZEEH)
    Wow! If I were you, I'll drop out as well. That was too much to take in a short span of time.

    I love the love story, by the way. which universities are you planning to go for, you're applying for the A100 (5 year programme) right?

    When are you taking the UKCAT/BMAT?
    I discovered GEM as a 'thing' towards the end of the academic year while I was on my year abroad, and geared up to finish my degree and go for that. I took the UKCAT that summer and did well, and booked the GAMSAT but was still too fatigued to go so didn't. After things worked out so well with my other half I decided to emigrate to Denmark to be with him instead of signing up to stay in the UK another 5+ years. I've been living here for nearly two years now.

    I've applied to Copenhagen but due to me wimping out of going to one specific exam, I will only get in if the grade point requirement (which I meet for last year) doesn't go up, which is very unlikely. If (when) I don't get in because of the score inevitably going up, I'll be applying next year to at least Copenhagen and the University of Southern Denmark, and hoping that the score at Copenhagen magically goes down so I don't have to move away from my partner (likely husband at that point) for any period of time, or convince him to go with me (he really doesn't like the idea of moving and the risk of financial insecurity he perceives that as bringing).

    Edit: By the way, A100 would never have been an option for me. It would have been finish my degree somehow (going back to uni or doing it through the OU) and apply for GEM or nothing. I have no access to funds to pay for A100.
 
 
 
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