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What's accommodation in university really like? Watch

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    (Original post by chelseajanett)
    My mum hates that I want to go away for uni, she's even said that I should just travel by train from London to Sussex every day.

    Her main problems are:
    1) People will steal your food
    2) You won't be able to revise because people who don't have exams will be partying

    What are the real pros and cons?
    Honestly, it depends on who you are put with in halls so it varies from flat to flat, but this is my opinion:
    Pros of living in halls:
    - You don't have to commute, it'll shorten your days and you don't have to deal with rail disruptions and delays
    - The security people in halls are, generally, very good at sorting out noise anonymously
    - Become more independent, the transition from home to halls to a house in your second/third year will prepare you for life after Uni
    - You'll meet a lot more people
    - If you're concerned about people using your food you can buy a mini fridge for your bedroom cheap from eBay or Amazon

    Cons of living in halls:
    - Potentially could be more expensive, depending on the Uni you go to
    - The risk of not getting on with flatmates - I don't get on with mine but we're still civil and respect each others things in the kitchen/shared area
    - Generally you'll have a smaller room than what you have at home
    - If you don't drink, you may find it hard to socialise with other people in halls

    I have had a few bad experiences with halls this year but I'd still advise any first year to move into them because problems can be easly sorted and worked out by uni or by you, especially if that's what they want and it's only other people advising you not to do it. Hope this helps!
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    Halls basically seems like a really long ****ty sleepover with people you met while drunk and, upon waking up half sober, you realise how much you hate them, and that everything is broken if it's not missing or pissed/puked on.
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    (Original post by emilyowston)
    Honestly, it depends on who you are put with in halls so it varies from flat to flat, but this is my opinion:
    Pros of living in halls:
    - You don't have to commute, it'll shorten your days and you don't have to deal with rail disruptions and delays
    - The security people in halls are, generally, very good at sorting out noise anonymously
    - Become more independent, the transition from home to halls to a house in your second/third year will prepare you for life after Uni
    - You'll meet a lot more people
    - If you're concerned about people using your food you can buy a mini fridge for your bedroom cheap from eBay or Amazon

    Cons of living in halls:
    - Potentially could be more expensive, depending on the Uni you go to
    - The risk of not getting on with flatmates - I don't get on with mine but we're still civil and respect each others things in the kitchen/shared area
    - Generally you'll have a smaller room than what you have at home
    - If you don't drink, you may find it hard to socialise with other people in halls

    I have had a few bad experiences with halls this year but I'd still advise any first year to move into them because problems can be easly sorted and worked out by uni or by you, especially if that's what they want and it's only other people advising you not to do it. Hope this helps!
    How do you find more independence living at halls? [You]'ll live off your parents there as well if not more, and you can go to class in your pyjama bottoms, and you'll probably end up doing things there that you never would living at home, nor not to such an extent as they could and most likely do at halls.

    And living off campus, especially in the city, you have to learn commute as if a regular person going to work, and I find that very independent because many people are terrified of commuting in the city alone.

    And if you live off campus to go Uni in a more car-demanding place, then you learn the responsibilities of having a car and better your driving.

    Also there are people who live off campus but who also do not live with their folks; they rent a flat out.

    I also find there could be some entitlement with some people living in halls, because they know mummy and daddy cashed out and will probably keep it that way. Whereas people living with their folks will have it more emphasised to get work because their parents might harp on them for not working. Like my mum tells me that it's not a hotel and I'm not on holiday.

    I just feel there's many a times a dangerous level of freedom/and contrarily loneliness, being away at halls with far less emphasis on self-sufficiency. Also self-sufficiency doesn't equal independence.

    I find there is independence in halls only because you don't see your parents, and many times, it's people who chose to go away for that very reason, so it's not necessarily going to be a learning experience.

    I mean its not that big of a deal,I just know people agree that halls means more independence which I find very aggravating because you can learn independence and self-sufficiency living off campus as well. I'm forced to do it everyday.
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    i dunno
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    I would definitely go for it, you get the odd person stealing your ketchup or a bit of milk or whatever but no one stole actual food and people are usually pretty respectful if you have work to do. Even when people do go partying they tend to pre till about 11 and go out, you could just put some music on during this time or have a break from revision, as others have said the library is always there anyway and you'll find at uni the library will be a place you're much more likely to spend time in than you would at sixth form/ college.

    I found the only bad thing about halls really was that I got homesick but I'm still glad I did it, as much as I missed home I'd move out one day anyway so now I've got used to it.

    Halls are definitely worth it! Especially if you don't live close to your uni, commuting as a first year is dire and I wouldn't do it unless absolutely necessary.
    Even if a bit of food gets stolen its better than having no friends and if your uni's commutable then you can always commute during exams when you want peace and quiet and still have a great social life in halls the rest of the time.
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    (Original post by Man.bear.pig)
    How do you find more independence living at halls? [You]'ll live off your parents there as well if not more, and you can go to class in your pyjama bottoms, and you'll probably end up doing things there that you never would living at home, nor not to such an extent as they could and most likely do at halls.

    And living off campus, especially in the city, you have to learn commute as if a regular person going to work, and I find that very independent because many people are terrified of commuting in the city alone.

    And if you live off campus to go Uni in a more car-demanding place, then you learn the responsibilities of having a car and better your driving.

    Also there are people who live off campus but who also do not live with their folks; they rent a flat out.

    I also find there could be some entitlement with some people living in halls, because they know mummy and daddy cashed out and will probably keep it that way. Whereas people living with their folks will have it more emphasised to get work because their parents might harp on them for not working. Like my mum tells me that it's not a hotel and I'm not on holiday.

    I just feel there's many a times a dangerous level of freedom/and contrarily loneliness, being away at halls with far less emphasis on self-sufficiency. Also self-sufficiency doesn't equal independence.

    I find there is independence in halls only because you don't see your parents, and many times, it's people who chose to go away for that very reason, so it's not necessarily going to be a learning experience.

    I mean its not that big of a deal,I just know people agree that halls means more independence which I find very aggravating because you can learn independence and self-sufficiency living off campus as well. I'm forced to do it everyday.
    Obviously this depends on what you already do at home, but for most people its the first time they have had to cook, clean do all their washing and get freedom over when/where they can come and go
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    (Original post by Man.bear.pig)
    How do you find more independence living at halls? [You]'ll live off your parents there as well if not more, and you can go to class in your pyjama bottoms, and you'll probably end up doing things there that you never would living at home, nor not to such an extent as they could and most likely do at halls.

    And living off campus, especially in the city, you have to learn commute as if a regular person going to work, and I find that very independent because many people are terrified of commuting in the city alone.

    And if you live off campus to go Uni in a more car-demanding place, then you learn the responsibilities of having a car and better your driving

    Also there are people who live off campus but who also do not live with their folks; they rent a flat out.

    I also find there could be some entitlement with some people living in halls, because they know mummy and daddy cashed out and will probably keep it that way. Whereas people living with their folks will have it more emphasised to get work because their parents might harp on them for not working. Like my mum tells me that it's not a hotel and I'm not on holiday.

    I just feel there's many a times a dangerous level of freedom/and contrarily loneliness, being away at halls with far less emphasis on self-sufficiency. Also self-sufficiency doesn't equal independence.

    I find there is independence in halls only because you don't see your parents, and many times, it's people who chose to go away for that very reason, so it's not necessarily going to be a learning experience.

    I mean its not that big of a deal,I just know people agree that halls means more independence which I find very aggravating because you can learn independence and self-sufficiency living off campus as well. I'm forced to do it everyday.
    For a lot of people just living without their parents is a big adjustment which helps them grow up and get independence. You're not going to live with your parents for ever so halls is a great opportunity to move out and learn to live without them, whilst also having a lot of support.
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    (Original post by Man.bear.pig)
    How do you find more independence living at halls? [You]'ll live off your parents there as well if not more, and you can go to class in your pyjama bottoms, and you'll probably end up doing things there that you never would living at home, nor not to such an extent as they could and most likely do at halls.

    And living off campus, especially in the city, you have to learn commute as if a regular person going to work, and I find that very independent because many people are terrified of commuting in the city alone.

    And if you live off campus to go Uni in a more car-demanding place, then you learn the responsibilities of having a car and better your driving.

    Also there are people who live off campus but who also do not live with their folks; they rent a flat out.

    I also find there could be some entitlement with some people living in halls, because they know mummy and daddy cashed out and will probably keep it that way. Whereas people living with their folks will have it more emphasised to get work because their parents might harp on them for not working. Like my mum tells me that it's not a hotel and I'm not on holiday.

    I just feel there's many a times a dangerous level of freedom/and contrarily loneliness, being away at halls with far less emphasis on self-sufficiency. Also self-sufficiency doesn't equal independence.

    I find there is independence in halls only because you don't see your parents, and many times, it's people who chose to go away for that very reason, so it's not necessarily going to be a learning experience.

    I mean its not that big of a deal,I just know people agree that halls means more independence which I find very aggravating because you can learn independence and self-sufficiency living off campus as well. I'm forced to do it everyday.
    Just to clear a few things u..
    I'm an adult therefore don't rely on my parents aside from the occasional lift to and from the train station when I come home for Christmas. And I have no idea what "doing things there that you never would living at home" actually means. Mummy and Daddy don't do everything for everyone, some people like to find their own feet.
    I'm not saying that commuting is bad, I'm saying that you'll avoid travel disruptions.
    My flat is off campus but in the city I study in and I drive, so I agree.
    If you're daft enough to rely on Mummy and Daddy in halls and if you need someone to tell you to get a job or some sort of work placement then it's clear that someone isn't ready for adult life.
    It can get lonely in halls, especially if you don't get on with your flatmates, but I just feel that has made me make more of an effort to go out with my course friends and meet people elsewhere. As for the too much freedom bit, I know what you mean but it depends on your choices as to whether the "too much freedom" is a bad thing.

    I understand where you're coming from, I've been self-sufficient since the age of 17 and there are clearly other ways of learning how to be self-sufficient but I feel that living away from home forces you to look after yourself rather than relying on Mum and Dad constantly. But I suppose every situation is different.
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    To stop people from stealing your food, try and get a mini fridge that you can keep in your bedroom and cook your meals in advance, then heat them when you want to eat it. Done.
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    (Original post by emilyowston)
    Just to clear a few things u..
    I'm an adult therefore don't rely on my parents aside from the occasional lift to and from the train station when I come home for Christmas. And I have no idea what "doing things there that you never would living at home" actually means. Mummy and Daddy don't do everything for everyone, some people like to find their own feet.
    I'm not saying that commuting is bad, I'm saying that you'll avoid travel disruptions.
    My flat is off campus but in the city I study in and I drive, so I agree.
    If you're daft enough to rely on Mummy and Daddy in halls and if you need someone to tell you to get a job or some sort of work placement then it's clear that someone isn't ready for adult life.
    It can get lonely in halls, especially if you don't get on with your flatmates, but I just feel that has made me make more of an effort to go out with my course friends and meet people elsewhere. As for the too much freedom bit, I know what you mean but it depends on your choices as to whether the "too much freedom" is a bad thing.

    I understand where you're coming from, I've been self-sufficient since the age of 17 and there are clearly other ways of learning how to be self-sufficient but I feel that living away from home forces you to look after yourself rather than relying on Mum and Dad constantly. But I suppose every situation is different.
    Ok the whole "living off mummy and daddy" was not to you per se, hence the brackets.

    Ok so we can agree that it depends on the person and their situation but I was explaining mine and I personally feel me myself wouldn't feel like I'm gaining self sufficiency so ultimately not true independence going away where my parents cashed out for me hypothetically to get there in the first place. And many people just have their folks pay for their needs while away. I still feel that living at home off campus or renting out on your own obviously will emphasise more independence.

    What I meant by being able to do things while away at halls that you can't do while living with your folks or renting from a private owner is obviously --like I mean everyone on here for starters complains about living with flatmates while at halls and uni accom. Basically unless your folks or landlord allow the all night parties and binge boozing and noise at all times 24/7 and banging and disruptions and sex and mess and all that...ok
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    (Original post by bassbabe)
    To stop people from stealing your food, try and get a mini fridge that you can keep in your bedroom and cook your meals in advance, then heat them when you want to eat it. Done.
    see. have to get a mini fridge to stop theft.
    that ain't freedom or independence. that's prison. lol
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    (Original post by Man.bear.pig)
    see. have to get a mini fridge to stop theft.
    that ain't freedom or independence. that's prison. lol
    I've never had a problem with food theft in university accommodation or shared houses - and no, I didn't have a mini fridge and I didn't keep my food in my room.

    There were a few bizarre things that went on with food (the girl who firmly believed that tinned tuna had to be kept in the fridge and another who thought lard and butter were the same thing being good examples) but beyond that there was never a problem with theft (unless you count someone borrowing a bit of milk for their tea once in a while, but I'm not that petty)

    Posted from TSR Mobile
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    (Original post by Origami Bullets)
    I've never had a problem with food theft in university accommodation or shared houses - and no, I didn't have a mini fridge and I didn't keep my food in my room.

    There were a few bizarre things that went on with food (the girl who firmly believed that tinned tuna had to be kept in the fridge and another who thought lard and butter were the same thing being good examples) but beyond that there was never a problem with theft (unless you count someone borrowing a bit of milk for their tea once in a while, but I'm not that petty)

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Okay? Just responding to someone who said it.
 
 
 
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