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    (Original post by Old_Simon)
    I am qualified to teach English as a foreign language. In general I suggest that shorter simpler sentences are much more powerful, are easier to read, and are less prone to grammatical error. If a sentence needs lots of commas then it indicates the sentence is probably too long anyway. Secondly as a general rule the fewer commas used at all, the better it is. Lawyers hate them for a very good reason which is why they rarely use them. To the OP I would say that you appear to have a virtually flawless grasp of grammar and have very little to worry about. No need to stress.
    Thank you. I wish I had a supportive teacher like you. You've made me feel better!
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    (Original post by fnatic NateDestiel)
    dont eat chocolate, lactose intolerant

    (Original post by chazwomaq)
    Both incorrect.



    Is English your first language?

    Most people use too many rather than too few commas. A simple way to minimise comma use is to write in short sentences. This is good writing style anyway.
    Yes, surprisingly english is my first language. I really don't think my school taught us properly, as I was in a low set in english GCSE. Well I retook english at college, and managed to hit A's and B's in exams, yet still feel on edge.
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    (Original post by chazwomaq)
    Both incorrect.



    Is English your first language?

    Most people use too many rather than too few commas. A simple way to minimise comma use is to write in short sentences. This is good writing style anyway.
    How would you use commas? I Know this will sound odd, but I feel confident while writing creative essays, like: stories, poems etc. writing a formal essay for law will have me in shivers. I will take your advice and will keep my sentences shorter in the future.
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    Can universities offer you with any kind of support?
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    (Original post by Highfiveyou)
    Yes, surprisingly english is my first language. I really don't think my school taught us properly, as I was in a low set in english GCSE. Well I retook english at college, and managed to hit A's and B's in exams, yet still feel on edge.
    Why was I quoted in this..
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    (Original post by fnatic NateDestiel)
    Why was I quoted in this..
    Oh my bad.
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    (Original post by Highfiveyou)
    Oh my bad.

    np x
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    Aww, here's a hug matie. :hugs:

    Feeling better?
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    (Original post by Old_Simon)
    In the UK, that morning was particularly sunny which was why I wanted to go to the beach. [Full stop - note shorter sentence]. There I was able to appreciate nature at it's most magnificent because every feature was highlighted by the morning rays. [Note: Only 1 comma throughout.]
    :eek:
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    (Original post by pane123)
    :eek:
    Fair one
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    (Original post by Highfiveyou)
    How would you use commas?

    I mean to take a breath like this:

    It was a sunny morning here in the UK, and this was why I wanted to go to the beach, this made me appreciate nature's most magnificent features as they were highlighted by the shinning sun.
    As Old Simon said, the sentence is poorly constructed and I would follow his advice.
 
 
 
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