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    (Original post by Klix88)

    Let's face it - restricting uni entry has been tried and is failing. Labour turned unis into a holding pen for the young unemployed. The ConDems derided this and capped student numbers in the mid-and low-rank grades. They then saw a massive rise in youth unemployment due to a lack of alternatives and are now removing the cap.
    I am sorry, this is false history.

    The number of places at universities were first capped immediately after WWII in consequence of the Barlow Report. They have remained capped ever since. They were decapped for AAB students in 2012 and ABB students in 2013. The definition of ABB was widened in 2014 and caps are due to be removed entirely in 2015.
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    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    I am sorry, this is false history.

    The number of places at universities were first capped immediately after WWII in consequence of the Barlow Report. They have remained capped ever since. They were decapped for AAB students in 2012 and ABB students in 2013. The definition of ABB was widened in 2014 and caps are due to be removed entirely in 2015.
    Interesting. I was more talking about the overall student body.

    Before the Robbins Report in 1963, university participation was at 4-5%. This had already risen markedly when Blair set the target to 50% in the 1999 and I think we're currently over 40%. The Barlow cap doesn't appear to have functioned for overall student numbers.

    http://www.timeshighereducation.co.u...87.fullarticle

    If you limited uni entry to ABB the numbers would drop back again, although to more than 4-5% as more students are achieving ABB and over. You'd still end up with a huge hike in youth unemployment.
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    (Original post by Klix88)
    Interesting. I was more talking about the overall student body.

    Before the Robbins Report in 1963, university participation was at 4-5%. This had already risen markedly when Blair set the target to 50% in the 1999 and I think we're currently over 40%. The Barlow cap doesn't appear to have functioned for overall student numbers.

    http://www.timeshighereducation.co.u...87.fullarticle

    If you limited uni entry to ABB the numbers would drop back again, although to more than 4-5% as more students are achieving ABB and over. You'd still end up with a huge hike in youth unemployment.
    There has been growth in student numbers (both absolute and as a proportion of the population) but until next year, the numbers each university (and thus the university sector as a whole) could recruit each year was centrally determined. Until the late 1980s this was done by the University Grants Committee which was a body a bit like the Arts Council. Obviously, at times when government policy has favoured expansion the cap has not "bitten" on universities because the cap has been expanding at least as fast as universities but nonetheless there has been a cap.

    From 1962

    http://hansard.millbanksystems.com/c...620607_HOC_143

    See the comment about the number of places to be provided by 1967

    From 1983

    http://hansard.millbanksystems.com/w...9830316_CWA_93

    Indeed at one time the UGC determined what subjects universities could offer places in
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    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    I am sorry, this is false history.

    The number of places at universities were first capped immediately after WWII in consequence of the Barlow Report. They have remained capped ever since. They were decapped for AAB students in 2012 and ABB students in 2013. The definition of ABB was widened in 2014 and caps are due to be removed entirely in 2015.
    I thought they were scrapping removing the cap in 2015 as it would leave a black hole in the budget with no way to afford it.

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    (Original post by Ruffiio)
    I thought they were scrapping removing the cap in 2015 as it would leave a black hole in the budget with no way to afford it.

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    No, that is speculation from commentators.

    I suspect selling the student loan book will be back on the agenda whoever wins the election. There is no earthly reason why government should hold these loans to maturity.
 
 
 
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