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Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Maths + FM students (AS) Watch

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    (Original post by physicsmaths)
    i did all of them except for biology.
    Fm - 7
    physics 8
    chemistry 7
    maths 6. h chem was my weakest. Physics is quite hard but easy if u understand it. Im trying to be average as physics for an average student will be the hardest. i was fine with it though. Just work through the year, a few hours a day. And you should easily get 90+ .
    i left chem and physics till last minute which was bad but i just about made it i think


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    this is what i think people will find on an average. For me all of them would be downgraded by 1-2


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    (Original post by Munrot07)
    Firstly, what sort of engineering? Imperial don't offer a straight out engineering degree you have to choose something like chemical, or mechanical There are somethings I don't know about as engineering has different aspects to biology in terms of application but i had AAAA at AS, A*A*A* A2 predictions and 5A*s and 6 As at GCSE.

    The only university that can see your UMS is cambridge. You can get 80% in your ASs or 100% and Imperial wont know the difference (unless your teachers mention it in your reference or you mention it in your personal statement). Also remember you can't get A*s at AS level.

    You want the best ASs you can achieve but equally don't feel bad if you get a B or two, you still have just as good a chance. Remember that you also need a really good personal statement, well written, lots of good content (done wider reading, extra curricular and work experience). Then you need a good reference with good predicted grades (but do well at AS and it wont be a problem). Then, you might (and pretty sure will) have an interview (I didn't have one for biology) and maybe do an admissions test (not sure if you need to on this one...best look it up).

    Just try your best at AS and you should be fine Good luck!
    Thanks but I meant A*s at GCSE ( sorry I didn't specify that).

    Also, I would like to study mechanical engineering.
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    (Original post by gavss)
    Thanks but I meant A*s at GCSE ( sorry I didn't specify that).

    Also, I would like to study mechanical engineering.
    5-7 A*s will be perfectly fine
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    (Original post by Munrot07)
    5-7 A*s will be perfectly fine
    Sorry to ask but would it make much difference of I achieved As and A*s in all but 2 or 3 of my subjects? Would i be judged on it if my a levels were excellent ( along with the PS,interview etc.)
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    (Original post by gavss)
    Sorry to ask but would it make much difference of I achieved As and A*s in all but 2 or 3 of my subjects? Would i be judged on it if my a levels were excellent ( along with the PS,interview etc.)
    Not to be rude or anything, but can you not use my thread as an university question thing? I kinda just want it to stay on topic, thanks
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    Helpful thread.
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    (Original post by gavss)
    Sorry to ask but would it make much difference of I achieved As and A*s in all but 2 or 3 of my subjects? Would i be judged on it if my a levels were excellent ( along with the PS,interview etc.)
    That would be fine
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    (Original post by Stanley Winchest)
    Helpful thread.
    Why helpful?
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    (Original post by thechemistress)
    Why helpful?
    I'm starting AS Chem, Bio, Psy and was working out if I should do Maths or physics for the forth AS.
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    (Original post by thechemistress)
    I have a few questions for people who have done all or >3 of the subjects above:
    1) How did you find the workload?
    2) Did you struggle around exam time? Was it hard to balance revision for all of them?
    3) How many frees did you have every week?
    4) How difficult did you find each of the subjects? (Rating out of 10, with 1 being easy and 10 being extremely difficult).
    5) How interesting did you find each of the subjects? (Out of 10)

    I'm just a bit worried because one of my friends who did the same subjects this year told me that it was one of the worst decisions of her life and that 'it was hell' D:
    I did all those subjects (although I picked up Biology AS in my second year of A levels, while I was doing the others as A2s)

    1) The workload was perfectly manageable, although I did have to be fairly organised with my time. I spent most of my 'frees' in the library doing homework, and had to work every evening too. I often went sailing at the weekends though, so had two days off a week. If you don't do many extracurriculars you'll be fine All the subjects complement each other very well - so you'll cover some topics twice, which is great because it's a bit of revision during the year and less stuff to learn at the end This is particularly true between Maths - FM, FM (mechanics modules) - Physics, Biology - Chemistry.

    2) I had a lot of exams, and that was back when we also had January exams - now you'll have A LOT of exams in the summer. Mind you, the summer exams often just built on the knowledge required for the January exams, so I guess they should be pretty easy come summer. It may be hard to do as many past papers as I did (all the past 10+ years worth...) but you should still be able to manage at least 5 in each subject, which should be enough to get a good grade. I would advice writing up your class notes into revision notes throughout the year (particularly if your school gives you short topic tests at the end of each module as it's good revision for those too) so you will have less notes to go through in the summer. You will want to be concentrating on past papers in the month or two coming up to exams, not deciphering notes from September.

    3) I think I had between 3 and 5 frees a week - but then I also did a few extra subjects so you may have more. It depends very much on your schools timetable - at mine there were a max of 7 lessons a day, and you did 5 lessons a week for each subject. Therefore, someone doing five subjects would have 10 frees a week.

    4) Maths 1; Further Maths 4; Physics 2; Chemistry 2; Biology 1 (but if I had done Biology in my AS year it would probably have been 2 since I wouldn't have done the Chemistry Biochem topic...).

    5) Maths 2; Further Maths 8; Physics 3 (it was really easy/ boring, no real physics/ maths involved because they simplified the syllabus so much); Chemistry 9; Biology 7 (too much memorising stuff to make it a 9/10, although everything was very interesting).

    I hope this helps
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    (Original post by thechemistress)
    I have a few questions for people who have done all or >3 of the subjects above:
    1) How did you find the workload?
    2) Did you struggle around exam time? Was it hard to balance revision for all of them?
    3) How many frees did you have every week?
    4) How difficult did you find each of the subjects? (Rating out of 10, with 1 being easy and 10 being extremely difficult).
    5) How interesting did you find each of the subjects? (Out of 10)

    I'm just a bit worried because one of my friends who did the same subjects this year told me that it was one of the worst decisions of her life and that 'it was hell' D:
    I have done Maths, Further Maths and Chemistry at AS level. My other AS was in English Lit so some things may not apply completely to me... I'd like to point out that I absolutely loved Maths and Further Maths but was a little bit indifferent with Chemistry and so I'm dropping it at the end of first year.

    1) Fine. As long as you start early... and since you clearly are, that'll be fine for you. If you start doing your revision/exam prep from the word go (that means revising in the evenings what you learned in lessons in the morning, brushing up on things you learned a month ago to make sure you don't forget stuff - not a lot of time really necessary but you need to be smart and make sure you don't forget stuff) then you'll be absolutely fine. In reality, the sciences are quite easy if you put the effort in as all it is is remembering facts and repeating them in the exam.

    2) Since I did my revision throughout the year, I really had no trouble in exam time as I had gradually spread my revision out... In fact, English Lit was the one which I was pressed for time with as there's far more to learn in my English Lit course than in maths/chem courses AND the humanities exams are first, the science exams are generally a week or so later - and that's an extra week for revision!

    3) Same as anyone who did any other combination of four subjects. The actual amount of time will depend upon your school/college though as each vary.

    4) Where 10/10 is the hardest and 1/10 is the easiest:
    Maths AS - 2/10
    Further Maths AS - 3/10 [for clarification, AS Further Maths is easy... I don't know if you know anything about the A level Maths modules yet, but Further Maths AS is really easy despite the amount of worth it is given]
    Chemistry AS - 2/10
    For context, English Lit AS - 7/10.

    5) Where 10/10 is bliss and 0/10 is hideous
    Maths AS - 9/10
    Further Maths AS - 10/10
    Chemistry AS - 5/10
    Again, for context, English Lit AS - 6/10.

    I would like to make the point here, and it may have already been made already, that you should know what A level sciences [Bio/Chem/Phys] are like. I went into Chemistry expecting it to be very different from the GCSE "learn this, repeat this, learn this, repeat this" method. A level Chemistry isn't, it's just more facts to learn and revise. Even though I did enjoy learning the stuff, eventually it got really tedious and boring and a pain in the rear whilst doing revision. And I think that's the same for the other sciences (Physics perhaps having slightly more application than Bio or Chem). If learning facts and repeating them is the thing for you, then that's great. Do sciences. If, like me, you expect[ed] something different at A level, then don't do sciences, do a humanities or a social science instead (although a lot of them have loads of facts too).

    Also, remember that Further Maths, even only at AS, gives you a massive edge when applying for Maths/Science-based degrees. I know it's a little way off, but if you intend on applying in that field (Medicine/Dentistry being the exception) then definitely do Further Maths, just because it's so so useful (as well as being loads of fun)
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    (Original post by thechemistress)
    Not to be rude or anything, but can you not use my thread as an university question thing? I kinda just want it to stay on topic, thanks
    Sorry about that, I am planning to take the same subjects as the OP
 
 
 
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