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    (Original post by Dehydrated)
    Actually, my friend was bullied at college (and we go to a good one) and clearly had some "catching up" to do re: social skills despite being a very nice kid. We go to a good college too.

    Unfortunately, life is full of social situations, and there are plenty of bullies even in the workplace and among adults. The sooner kids learn how to deal with both those who like them and those who don't the better.

    I have no doubt my friend would've coped with the bullying much better had he not been home schooled.



    Aware of those, wouldn't say it's worth the trade off.

    What benefits would you say are so great?
    [/FONT][/COLOR]
    I'll let Tyrion respond to the bits before the bolded text XD

    It has many benefits, as I outlined in one of my posts. These benefits include more freedom to study your interests in depth, one to one teaching, and developing self study skills (Which people who go to school may lack, although obviously this is not always the case).

    You also have the chance to pursue things outside of the standard curriculum, such as sport or other talents. I pursued my talent, and I doubt I would have reached the standard I am now if I had gone to school.
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    lmao, school isn't for socialising.

    Being home - schooled, I can choose what exams I want to take, early entrance for exams and have greater independence.

    And by self - teaching the work it will put me in greater stead in later life.

    But by all means go to school filled with incompetent teachers and kids that you will never see again - once you go to uni :yep:



    (Original post by Chief Wiggum)
    No, I wouldn't.

    I would send them to school so that they could form friendships, get taught by properly qualified teachers, and experience what the vast majority of other children do.
    (Original post by Dehydrated)
    No. It should be made illegal IMO. Allowing parents to socially deprive their kids like that is horrendous.
    (Original post by karmacrunch)
    No, I wouldn't.
    I think that being able to be with other children your age will allow them to grow mentally. They can build friendships and kind of get a taste of life e.g. working with others. Obviously they'd have friends outside of school but it's to mix with other people.
    As a parent you'd probably become quite stressed, especially when your child is young. When will you have time to work etc.?
    Also, by the time your child gets to secondary school, take science as an example for experiments, you probably won't have as good facilities as the school.

    IN FUTURE
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    (Original post by fnatic NateDestiel)
    lmao, school isn't for socialising.



    But by all means go to school filled with incompetent teachers and kids that you will never see again - once you go to uni :yep:
    I think making friends is an important part of school.

    I don't see what the relevance is that you won't see a lot of them again once you go to uni - people make different groups of friends throughout their life.
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    (Original post by Dehydrated)
    Props to you if you would have But bullying is common at college, university and in the "adult world" too - I do think kids need to learn to deal with it. If you start a thread asking if anyone was/has been bullied in any of those situations you'll probably get quite a few responses. Sad but not everyone grows up at 16

    I do think you should offer your kids a choice at least. My friend often seems down about having not had a "normal" childhood or best friends etc. through school.
    Not to the same extent. And the focus should be on teaching bullies not to bully.

    I'm often down about not having had a "normal" childhood due to the severe depression, night terrors and various other issues I've been left with. State secondary schools are not nice places.

    also do the teaching is rubbish. It caters to the average rather than the individual!
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    (Original post by fnatic NateDestiel)
    lmao, school isn't for socialising.

    Being home - schooled, I can choose what exams I want to take, early entrance for exams and have greater independence.

    And by self - teaching the work it will put me in greater stead in later life.

    But by all means go to school filled with incompetent teachers and kids that you will never see again - once you go to uni :yep:
    You honestly think that about 90% of people at uni don't already have friends from home?

    Where do you think the vast majority of these friends come from?

    Also - how are you socialising right now?
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    (Original post by Tyrion_Lannister)
    I want to but my boyfriend doesn't.

    I don't like how schools churn out nice little drones and stamp the individuality out of people. I also don't like the bullying culture, pathetic social norms and childish games. I hated school.

    My boyfriend wants to give them the choice
    A Steiner school is probably your best bet. It allows children to gain individuality and express their inner creativity. If I were to have kids, this would probably be my best bet depending on my partners' beliefs.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Waldorf_education
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    (Original post by AmyAintDead)
    A Steiner school is probably your best bet. It allows children to gain individuality and express their inner creativity. If I were to have kids, this would probably be my best bet depending on my partners' beliefs.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Waldorf_education
    This is awesome and yeah I'd be cool with something like that
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    (Original post by Chief Wiggum)
    No, I wouldn't.

    I would send them to school so that they could form friendships, get taught by properly qualified teachers, and experience what the vast majority of other children do.
    This.

    I would want them to have the normal school experience, make friends and learn to socialise. And of course, have qualified teachers.
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    (Original post by EXTREMEninja)
    I'll let Tyrion respond to the bits before the bolded text XD

    It has many benefits, as I outlined in one of my posts. These benefits include more freedom to study your interests in depth, one to one teaching, and developing self study skills (Which people who go to school may lack, although obviously this is not always the case).

    You also have the chance to pursue things outside of the standard curriculum, such as sport or other talents. I pursued my talent, and I doubt I would have reached the standard I am now if I had gone to school.
    I have no doubt that it often has some educational benefits, but, again, I'm highly skeptical that they're worth pretty much missing out on a "normal childhood" for.

    Pursuing things out of the standard curriculum is great - for example, if a kid seemed to be an incredibly skilled tennis player at 10 or something, I could see the parents home-schooling them till 16 or something. But what if it didn't work out and the kid had missed out on a large part of their teenage years for nothing? Do kids really have the ability to decide stuff like that for themselves at such a young age? Should parents be allowed to decide for them (as is probably usually the case), either?

    Also - going back to my main point, if you were home-schooled, how did you socialise? I don't mean to be mean, but knowing people other than my friend who have also been home-schooled and of course knowing plenty of people who did go to school, there is really quite a significant difference in their social skills. There is quite simply no substitute I can think of for the school environment, short of "home-schooling" parents pretty much setting up their own mini-classes which I've never seen and is a school in all but name anyway.

    One-to-one teaching and all that attention and focus, while undoubtedly great, can also lead to a child being unusually too sheltered (from what I've seen). In the real world, you're going to have to learn to just be "one of the crowd" and do as you're told/listen to authority in the vast majority of jobs. School teaches you that. You're also going to have to learn to stick to a timetable, deal with people who don't like you and even bullies, and get on with other people. School teaches you that.

    If a child doesn't learn key social skills by the time they are 16 and start college (or even 18 and go to university/enter the workforce), being that behind is going to affect their lives. Including their studies. I've seen it in people other than my friend. They have to play "catch up" socially. How would you feel being the only kid on the first day at university who probably had no real "home friends" to talk about and not much of a "normal childhood" in common with the other kids?

    If life were all about education and pursuing your talents, I'd be all for home-schooling. But it's about more than that.
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    Have you not seen Mean Girls?
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    (Original post by Tyrion_Lannister)
    This is awesome and yeah I'd be cool with something like that
    It's truly a wonderful way of providing an education, and I think a couple of my friends would have developed wonderfully in a Steiner school as the state schools in my area that wasn't mine at least are more grade focused than individual focused.

    I was fortunate in the state school I went to, where the curriculum is fluent Welsh and we had an excellent counselling team, a humble 'family' community, where creativity is worshipped to the point where our slogan is 'Talent, learning and goodness' (Dawn, Dysg, Diaoni), and any conflicts were quickly stopped. However, I feel the Steiner education can kind of pick up where my school's weaknesses are.
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    (Original post by AmyAintDead)
    It's truly a wonderful way of providing an education, and I think a couple of my friends would have developed wonderfully in a Steiner school as the state schools in my area that wasn't mine at least are more grade focused than individual focused.

    I was fortunate in the state school I went to, where the curriculum is fluent Welsh and we had an excellent counselling team, a humble 'family' community, where creativity is worshipped to the point where our slogan is 'Talent, learning and goodness' (Dawn, Dysg, Diaoni), and any conflicts were quickly stopped. However, I feel the Steiner education can kind of pick up where my school's weaknesses are.
    I'm reading about them and they sound great
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    (Original post by Dehydrated)
    You honestly think that about 90% of people at uni don't already have friends from home?

    Where do you think the vast majority of these friends come from?

    Also - how are you socialising right now?
    lmao.

    I don't socialise I network to put it eloquently :smug:
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    (Original post by fnatic NateDestiel)
    lmao.

    I don't socialise I network to put it eloquently :smug:
    Yes, surprisingly enough, we are all aware of networking :rolleyes: Your dodging around my question and trying to brush this issue off with "lmao" is pretty telling. And you seriously think networking makes up for having friends? Please - don't make me laugh. This sort of perspective on life is exactly why I am not going to home-school my kids. The lack of social awareness would be hilarious, if I didn't (honestly) pity you knowing how you're probably going to get on with others at uni.

    Also - again, you're seriously unaware that the vast majority of people at uni have home friends and the majority of these home friends will have been made at school? SMH, just SMH. :lol: Had you gone to school, you'd certainly be aware of this fact. Trust me, it will hit you cold and hard once you do actually start university. Even more so if you go early.

    Instead of trotting around with the kind of obnoxious superiority complex that will probably also discredit you in the social stakes at uni, I'm going to give you some serious advice: If you haven't already, make home friends. You are almost certainly not going to fit in the way you are (in b4 "I don't want to fit in, I'm happy having zero social life through uni"). And try being a little less arrogant and brushing up on your social skills generally, too.
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    (Original post by Tyrion_Lannister)
    I want to but my boyfriend doesn't. I don't like how schools churn out nice little drones and stamp the individuality out of people. I also don't like the bullying culture, pathetic social norms and childish games. I hated school. My boyfriend wants to give them the choice
    You sound delusional. Do you also think 9/11 was an inside job? Your children are gonna miss out on a whole load of lifes lessons, they're going to be socially inept and selfish.
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    (Original post by Tyrion_Lannister)
    Not to the same extent. And the focus should be on teaching bullies not to bully.

    I'm often down about not having had a "normal" childhood due to the severe depression, night terrors and various other issues I've been left with. State secondary schools are not nice places.

    also do the teaching is rubbish. It caters to the average rather than the individual!
    I agree with you about "teaching bullies not to bully," but, in practice, unless society goes through some major upheaval we are always going to have bullies even in relatively "grown-up" environments like uni. And obviously people are going to have to socialise at some point. So it makes sense for them to learn social skills ASAP IMO :dontknow:

    Sorry to hear that :hugs:

    I do think some schools can obviously learn to deal with bullying/improve their teaching standards better. But, short of a school being really bad, I still think that kids should learn to be in that kind of environment sooner rather than later. I mean, even as an adult, you're not going to always have a boss you like (esp. as a new graduate), be able to do exactly what you like whenever you want and work on your own/avoid those you don't like, unless you are extremely privileged and fortunate to get a very unique kind of job.
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    (Original post by Chief Wiggum)
    No, I wouldn't.

    I would send them to school so that they could form friendships, get taught by properly qualified teachers, and experience what the vast majority of other children do.
    I agree
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    (Original post by de_coinies)
    You sound delusional. Do you also think 9/11 was an inside job? Your children are gonna miss out on a whole load of lifes lessons, they're going to be socially inept and selfish.
    I wouldn't go as far as calling her delusional, no need to be rude But I do agree with the whole "children missing out" thing.

    I also don't think that parents who may be very "individual" adults (not talking about you Tyrion, just people generally like my friend's parents) should be allowed to deprive their kids of normal childhoods simply because they themselves would have rather given school a miss. I think anyone with a reasonable understanding of how people socialise can see how a homeschooled kid is likely to end up inept at making friends.

    Not to mention that having everything in your life "tailor made" to you and having a relatively flexible schedule can lead to someone being horribly self-centred.
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    (Original post by Dehydrated)
    I wouldn't go as far as calling her delusional, no need to be rude But I do agree with the whole "children missing out" thing. I also don't think that parents who may be very "individual" adults (not talking about you Tyrion, just people generally like my friend's parents) should be allowed to deprive their kids of normal childhoods simply because they themselves would have rather given school a miss. I think anyone with a reasonable understanding of how people socialise can see how a homeschooled kid is likely to end up inept at making friends.
    You're right it's completely selfish and detrimental to any child's upbringing.
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    (Original post by de_coinies)
    You're right it's completely selfish and detrimental to any child's upbringing.
    I think the worst example of this is those parents who home-school their kids and force/push them into do A-levels early and whatnot so they can start uni early and the parents can brag about it.
 
 
 
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