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    Right now, everything seems impossible and murky. But your kind words, honest replies and empathy is helping me immensely.
    Thank you everyone for answering my queries and helping me to build up my knowledge.

    I am still trying to gather some courage to speak to hear without crying.
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    (Original post by strose)
    Right now, everything seems impossible and murky. But your kind words, honest replies and empathy is helping me immensely.
    Thank you everyone for answering my queries and helping me to build up my knowledge.

    I am still trying to gather some courage to speak to hear without crying.
    Oh I feel your pain at the feeling of helplessness.

    Some people are not destined to do the A level ===> uni degree route

    When my elder son didn't get his A level grades for his chosen degree but got in the same uni on a diploma course I told him that he would find his own level. If that was meant to be a diploma then so be it and we were proud of him whatever. As it happened when he started his diploma the uni soon recognised his potential and moved him up to the B.Sc he'd originally applied for and then again up to the B.Eng which was above what he'd thought he was capable of. He got a 2.1 in the end. Many of his uni cohort had come in a bit older ie in their early 20s or more and didn't have the traditional A level requirements but got on just fine.

    It is just possible that your daughter may be one of those people who are better going via an alternative route.

    Hugs and best wishes to you both
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    (Original post by strose)
    Right now, everything seems impossible and murky. But your kind words, honest replies and empathy is helping me immensely.
    Thank you everyone for answering my queries and helping me to build up my knowledge.

    I am still trying to gather some courage to speak to hear without crying.
    I have PM'd you - I hope you find our story inspiring. I really do understand. I have been there twice with my eldest and my middle one is there now. Message me if you need help.
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    oh also for french, I'd recommend that your daughter uses memrise.com for vocab learning, it really did wonders for me (I actually learnt like 90% of the vocab instead of memorising it for the vocab test and then forgetting most of it, and it made vocab learning fun! you get points for like each time you practise and I'm naturally competitive so I wanted to get the most points haha)
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    (Original post by strose)
    Btbbt, Kudos to you and your lucky friends on receiving superb A2 grades and
    best of luck to all of you in your future endeavours!

    She went through past papers and worked hard.
    What else can she do to enhance her abilities? Elaborate please.
    Both of her C grades are showing 105 points. I am dubious if they are high Cs.

    GCSE grades were 4 As / 5 Bs and 2 Cs
    Thanks. Just in case you're thinking my friend's are some sort of superhumans, I should add those were their AS grades, they've just retaken and are doing their A2s next year, but still, it's possible! A good start would be to speak to her teachers; sounds obvious but really worth the effort as in all honesty they're gonna be the best ones qualified to judge the situation. They've taught her and should be able to offer some good advice (at the very least its another perspective). Brainstorming the exams can be a good strategy. Try and work out what went wrong; a C grade suggests the problem is more likely knowledge based than exam technique, so revising longer and harder could work. It's tough but worth it. I did around 4 hours a day from mid-February this year and whilst I wouldn't recommend being quite as 'extreme' as I was, a couple of hours each evening from March to May should go far. Study past paper mark schemes, most points tend to be cyclic i.e. there will be certain answers to Q's that crop up every year. Learn all these and you've already got a dozen or so extra marks. French tutor perhaps? Expose yourself to as much French as possible, broadening vocab. Biology is, essentially just rote-learning. Google 'memory of loci' and 'memory palace techniques' - it really makes a difference on those awkward little key facts, dates, names etc. English Literature is toughest to revise, however, some good tips include: sorting out a template essay plan (there's plenty of stuff on the web, just Google it) , annotating the heck out of the set texts and memorising a few 'big' conceptual points about each, the really clever stuff that'll grab an examiner's attention. There's no mystical secret I'm afraid, just hard work. Finally, if your daughter's considering subject changes, I'd recommend sticking solely to the subjects she got A's in at GCSE. Always try and play to your strengths. Hope this helps
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    P.S. There is also Clearing if things still don't look up after A2. Universities often drop their offers by a grade, sometimes even two. Universities want motivated students and there will be places keen to have your daughter I'm sure. Super-curricular may help compensate for lower grades as well; real evidence of passion for the subject, independent reading outside of the syllabus etc.
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    (Original post by strose)
    My daughter dropped her Chemistry in March and just few days ago she received her AS result.

    French= C
    English Literature = C
    Biology= E

    She wants to study Modern Languages in Aberystwyth University and their requirement is Grade B in French.

    Is it wise to repeat AS without science subjects?
    She wants to retake French and Biology with A2?
    What are her chances getting into university?
    Is university education right for her?

    Considering her grades, I want an honest opening please.
    Re-take. Have a year or two out. She'll come back all guns blazing. Don't rush it, and don't jump into vocational education just yet (esp not for a girl). All it takes is a year or two and there will be no problem at all. The time out seems like an eternity for an 18 year old, but it really, really isn't - there is no practical difference between going to university at 18 and going at 20.

    Moreover, don't listen to this lot on here. Most of them have a strong belief in an extremely formulaic view of life - A+B = C. If X doesn't work, go for Y or Z. They have little or no experience of apprenticeship besides "hearing" the term flung around on the internet.


    Just for context - I have a D and an E in my A-levels. I have been to university twice on the strength of a BTEC. I have also had vocational education. I have read Laws and Economics. I have two children.
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    (Original post by Clip)
    I have two children.
    This can be achieved without any O levels at all.
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    (Original post by strose)
    My daughter dropped her Chemistry in March and just few days ago she received her AS result.

    French= C
    English Literature = C
    Biology= E

    She wants to study Modern Languages in Aberystwyth University and their requirement is Grade B in French.

    Is it wise to repeat AS without science subjects?
    She wants to retake French and Biology with A2?
    What are her chances getting into university?
    Is university education right for her?

    Considering her grades, I want an honest opening please.
    Retaking 2 AS levels along with her A levels sounds like a lot, especially if she has been struggling with 4 AS levels this year. My advice would be that you email Aberystwyth and ask them whether they think it would be necessary for her to retake both subjects. Do they require a 4th AS level? And by how much did she miss a B in French? It is very possible that a student who works hard will get one grade higher in their A2 than their AS without retaking. It would be worth talking to her teachers about this.

    As for her chances of getting in to Aberystwyth, you will probably get some indication of that by emailing and asking them. They will probably give you an honest answer. It is also worth bearing in mind that there may be many unis which would take her with a predicted C in French, and that if she gets a better grade than expected at A2 then she could always 'trade up'. I believe that Aberystwyth is quite popular, and so it might be good for her to start looking at other universities as well. But it is too early to rule Aberystwyth out. They're only asking for one grade higher than she has got.

    I think that she should definitely aim for university unless she has a clear idea of what she would do otherwise. So many people have degrees nowadays that she will probably be at a disadvantage if she doesn't, unless she has learnt a specialist skill. At this point she should at least have something to aim for, otherwise the next year may be quite disheartening and she might not put her all in to improving her grades.
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    (Original post by strose)
    My daughter dropped her Chemistry in March and just few days ago she received her AS result.

    French= C
    English Literature = C
    Biology= E

    She wants to study Modern Languages in Aberystwyth University and their requirement is Grade B in French.

    Is it wise to repeat AS without science subjects?
    She wants to retake French and Biology with A2?
    What are her chances getting into university?
    Is university education right for her?

    Considering her grades, I want an honest opening please.

    Don't fret that she hasn't got all A grades. A levels are a lot harder than GCSEs and a lot of people don't realise how much more work they have to put into them to get the same sort of marks they got last year. It's also quite a young age to decide what you want to do for the rest of your life; if you know, then you're lucky!
    I'm 21 and I just finished my A levels. It was my 3rd time at college. At 16, I had big dreams of becoming a doctor and earning mega bucks, but I just wasn't mature enough at the time to do the work required to do well. I have since realised what career path I wish to follow and it's very different to what I thought then. What I'm saying is, she may not have got top marks if her heart isn't in it.

    You need to support her and tell her it's okay she didn't get straight As, everyone does stuff at their own pace. She may, if she takes a year out, find out her passion. She will also be able to resit AS modules (in French if you will) while studying for her A2 to bring those marks up. Sometimes it twigs second time around!

    University is not for everyone, but I believe even the lifestyle is good experience for the future, learning to manage your own expenses and responsibilities. Your daughter will most likely be able to go to uni on the grades she has- not all of them want As! (p.s. I find that most people come up by one grade in A2 so a C will become a B so long as she consistently works hard)

    Good luck!
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    She should retake the AS levels if she is unable to do well in the resit.

    Anything is possible, if she can be motivated enough intrinsically she will get better grades. If she is unable to get the B in French then a gap year would suffice. Know enough people who miss their offers, do a gap year and get in the next year. Also if she doesn't get accepted and she does better she can always have a gap year and she can choose that uni with the grades.

    Best of luck with your daughter but A levels are not the end of the world, you can always repeat them and you can then apply for uni with the requisite grades. May take a year out but it's necessary.
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    (Original post by strose)
    Right now, everything seems impossible and murky. But your kind words, honest replies and empathy is helping me immensely.
    Thank you everyone for answering my queries and helping me to build up my knowledge.

    I am still trying to gather some courage to speak to hear without crying.
    I can't speak as a parents or an AS level student because I'm neither. But I am a 27 year old that did poorly in school. I didn't have such academic support from my parents when I was younger and your daughter is very lucky to have you. Has she spoken with her teachers to figure out what she can do to improve? Has she considered taking a gap year after she finishes school? I went to college right out of school and it was a huge mistake. I wasn't a good student and I didn't care. That doesn't mean that she is the same way, but maybe she's putting too much stress into going to university within the next couple of years. Take a deep breath and discuss all the options with her. Bad grades happen. It's not the end of the world, and it's not the end of her academic career either.
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    I got CDDU in my AS levels last year, dropped the U subject and took 95% of my AS exams again alongside my A2s (16 in total, I think). It was hard work but I managed to get ABB at AS, and BBB overall. I'm now off to do chemistry at university. If she's determined and willing to work hard, she'll do well.



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    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    This can be achieved without any O levels at all.
    I had to work damn hard for those two.
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    18 months ago my daughter was working at E/E/U in her subjects at AS. I don't think she realised how large the leap from gcse to AS was and the the fact that the school was put into special measures very shortly after speaks volumes for the teaching! With a terrific amount of work and massive support from home she managed to achieve AS grades of BDD. Not as good as we would have liked but the best she could have got given that a third of the year had virtually been wasted.

    I was determined that she would improve in her A2s and was very proactive to ensure this. I was in contact with the head and post 16 frequently and made sure that they provided support and guidance where necessary. I have to point out that this school is still in special measures by ofsted so you may not need to follow my path.

    Back to present day and she achieved A2 results of BCC. B was in French and she is off to study French and Spanish at Nottingham trent. RR14 course the same as your daughter.

    I believe that with support your daughter will get the necessary grades. I wouldn't recommend resitting AS as the workload at A2 is high enough as it is. For french A2 you study a region or film and you also translate a book. The school decided on the region for my daughter but in retrospect it would have been better if she had chosen the region as she didn't particularly enjoy learning about Quebec. This could be an option that you could explore with the school as it's far easier to learn if you're engaged with the task. Another tip is to ensure that she continually revises from the get go, essential when translating the book. As a parent I'd recommend too that you familiarise yourself with each exam board's course specs and mark schemes so that you can see what's necessary to hit each grade.

    Finally can I ask why Aberystwyth is your daughter's choice? My daughter decided on NTU for various reasons but primarily because the modules are far more contemporary in nature. Swansea was her insurance ( who accepted her with her grades) and their French and Spanish course looks good too.

    Best of luck. Any questions feel free to ask.











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    could she resit her year 12 english, french and do psychology or something
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    Mum? OMG why are you on here?!?!
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    It's her life, not yours. I'd probably end up running away if I had a parent with that much concern and knowledge of my education.
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    (Original post by xloisx)
    It's her life, not yours. I'd probably end up running away if I had a parent with that much concern and knowledge of my education.
    Maybe one day you'll see it differently - most parents just want to see their kids happy and right now Strose is feeling desperately sad and worried for her daughter and trying to be supportive to her. We may say and do the wrong things sometimes, as parents, but after 18 years of loving and caring for someone you don't just walk away and say 'it's your life'. You have a lot of love invested in that life and that future and you want it to be the best it can be.
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    (Original post by oldlady)
    Maybe one day you'll see it differently - most parents just want to see their kids happy and right now Strose is feeling desperately sad and worried for her daughter and trying to be supportive to her. We may say and do the wrong things sometimes, as parents, but after 18 years of loving and caring for someone you don't just walk away and say 'it's your life'. You have a lot of love invested in that life and that future and you want it to be the best it can be.
    My own parents TRUST me to make my own decisions, they care, but they don't care to the extent that they actually try to dictate what I do with my life. If I was to fail my AS Levels, they'd talk to me and support me with any decision that I make, they wouldn't try to make that decision for me, or even encourage me to take a particular path.
 
 
 
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