"If your parents buy you everything, you will never appreciate the value of money." Watch

janninev866
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#21
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#21
What RFowler said, totally.

Also... If you give your kids EVERYTHING, of course they're not going to learn the value of things. They will think they're just entitled to things & feel that they don't have to work for anything too hard. Not healthy. It's not teaching them to appreciate what they have, and possibly not teaching them to be completely independent. And not setting them up for when the parents have passed away. Seriously, I know people in their late 30's who still rely on mummy & daddy to help them out.

However, when/if I am lucky enough to my own children, of course I will give them the things that I never had. But I will also teach them to be grateful. But yeah, what's the point in my hard work just benefiting me?
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TheNoobishKnight
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#22
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#22
(Original post by The_Last_Melon)
I would call that dual ownership regardless of the legislation. I think when you use something you become a surrogate owner of it.

But that is just nonsense to protect my argument. You are right.
I mean you could rent a car too . Your argument is still very good, nonetheless.
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The_Last_Melon
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#23
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#23
(Original post by TheNoobishKnight)
I mean you could rent a car too . Your argument is still very good, nonetheless.
Arguments are either valid or invalid.
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TheNoobishKnight
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#24
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#24
(Original post by The_Last_Melon)
Arguments are either valid or invalid.
I don't know whether it's valid or invalid, but can it still not be good, if it's either?
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The_Last_Melon
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#25
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#25
(Original post by TheNoobishKnight)
I don't know whether it's valid or invalid, but can it still not be good, if it's either?
It can be sound which means: its premises are true and the argument is valid (flows logically).
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green.tea
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#26
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#26
Surely if your parents bought you a Ferrari you'd know more about the value of money than if they bought you a second hand Fiat?

You'd be like "Money bought my Ferrari and I *love* my Ferrari. Money's cool."

You'd be more motivated to keep what you'd become accustomed to than someone trying to get more than they were accustomed to, precisely because you'd have a better idea of the value, through the experience of having it.
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Kaiju
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#27
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#27
(Original post by SuperiorGenius)
What a stupid opinion. I wouldn't expect anything more from working class peasants.
wow, dude
rly?
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green.tea
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#28
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#28
(Original post by SuperiorGenius)
What a stupid opinion. I wouldn't expect anything more from working class peasants.
This too. ^ I mean working class peasants generally don't see anything wrong with being, and continuing to be working class peasants. They are therefore unable to appreciate the value of not being.
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Kaiju
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#29
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#29
Nice generalisations, y'all.

Completely ignoring the point of the phrase - it's advocating the position that somebody has never been without.

If you've never experienced the difference between having and not having, you're no better off than the "peasants" you're referring to.
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green.tea
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#30
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#30
(Original post by Kaiju)
Nice generalisations, y'all.

Completely ignoring the point of the phrase - it's advocating the position that somebody has never been without.

If you've never experienced the difference between having and not having, you're no better off than the "peasants" you're referring to.
Well you would still experience that. I mean at one point you'd not have a Ferrari, then you'd ask for a Ferrari, be given a Ferrari and then you'd have a Ferrari. So you'd know that having a Ferrari is better than not. The difference between not having a Ferrari and having a Ferrari is bigger than the one between not having a Fiat and having a Fiat.

The more stuff your parents bought you the more difference you'd experience.
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bahonsi
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#31
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I disagree, it's not always the case My parents have bought my last three cars not because they wanted to spoil me but rather they would like me not to worry/stress about it and focus on my goals. They also pay my rent and have done for the last 4 years. Despite me working. This has enabled me to save up money so when am done with uni I have enough money to do whatever I want.

Granted am not from a poor background and despite being given a sliver spoon I appreciate the value of 1usd. When I was younger my pocket money was around 50usd and I had to work for that. Be it clean the house go shopping with Mon and Dad and carry the bags in etc. They made me know the worth of money.

Although I have mates who just live of Mon and Dad, never had a days work in their live and all just want to party in the Hampton's and enjoy life, those kids don't appreciate money as its a constant in their life. And sadly sometimes that's the case people don't tend to appreciate what they have too much of. It's the parents responsibility to instil values into the children and am happy mine did. Although I will always have bank of Mon and Dad, I do know what it means to work for your money.
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RF_PineMarten
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#32
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#32
(Original post by Rakas21)
I'd actually disagree with the car. Since most people don't live in rurality there's very little need for a car over public transport (indeed government schemes often mean its much cheaper) and most people live in the university city. I shan't be buying my own children a car until they work full time.
I can't speak for absolutely everyone, but I'm at university and I would really struggle without a car to get to shops and to other places I want to go. Public transport isn't always reliable. Cars give you much needed independence to go where you want when you want to and it saves a lot of hassle.

Not only that, but a lot of jobs actually require you to have a full driving license to even be considered. Even if it's not a requirement, not having one can sometimes be a disadvantage.
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glycerin
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#33
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#33
This is incredibly shallow as most people would have the experience in managing the money their parents give them to spend and save. You find money from whichever source has its value and can easily slip between your fingers when you prioritize instant gratification. And is painful to part with when it's been bitterly hoard up for far too long.

Be a giver and you'll be happy for making others happy! The value of money is happiness in giving to the interest of others.
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WeedCanKill
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#34
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#34
Silver spooners get such a shock when the real world hits. Unlike the golden spooners, who get fed like babies by their mummy and daddy until they die.

In all honesty, I never really had my parents round when I was younger. I liked being "latch key" kid. I learned how to run a house by 11 and was financially independent by the time EMA came around.

"Counting beans" as my friend Clip put it, may seem like killjoy but it's the way some people have to be to survive these days. Suppose you wouldn't have much experience of that hardship though, if you do please correct me.
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Izzyyyyy
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#35
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#35
I'm not completely sure about this one. I mean me personally, I have never been given any pocket money or anything and my parents buy me stuff, but it depends I don't really think it affects people much, I mean the person who wrote that was obviously jealous because his parents didn't buy hima car


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bluemax
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#36
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#36
It's true but I guess the kids age playing a major factor. Growing up my parents din't buy everything we siblings use to ask for. If it was something expensive they used to agree on the condition that we get a good result and hence there was an incentive to it. However, as grew up to 18+ our parents started refusing us less and less. I guess you need to learn the lesson while you're young because as you grow older you realize the value of money.
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Rakas21
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#37
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#37
(Original post by RFowler)
I can't speak for absolutely everyone, but I'm at university and I would really struggle without a car to get to shops and to other places I want to go. Public transport isn't always reliable. Cars give you much needed independence to go where you want when you want to and it saves a lot of hassle.

Not only that, but a lot of jobs actually require you to have a full driving license to even be considered. Even if it's not a requirement, not having one can sometimes be a disadvantage.
Well i suppose i can only speak for my experience in Leeds, for £80 per month students get unlimited bus and train travel in West Yorkshire.

I don't think it's such a factor for jobs at university however it is something of a factor for 'proper jobs'.
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Lil08
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#38
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#38
Your dad giving you more opportunities isn't quite the same as someone being spoilt with a car.

Personally speaking, even if my parents brought me everything, I'd still have something to point at and be ungrateful about. Its just human nature.
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Ggmu!
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#39
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#39
If your parents buy you a car and you don't need one, you're spoiled, end of.

Facebook philosophers are the worst.

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Olderandwiser23
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#40
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#40
Even if I was loaded I make my kids get a job age 14. I want them to learn the value or earning and saving for the things they want. I will help them with education costs but if they want something they can earn the money and save for it.
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