Working while doing A levels Watch

cheeriosarenice
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#21
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#21
(Original post by ByronicHero)
Yes. No.
Did that not make you unhappy? Why didn't you worry about a drug addict going through your food etc?
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LJDRx
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#22
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#22
How long have you lived here?
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ByronicHero
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#23
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#23
(Original post by cheeriosarenice)
Did that not make you unhappy? Why didn't you worry about a drug addict going through your food etc?
I was already unhappy, and because there is little you can do about it. I did care, I did get angry and I did take some action but ultimately I just stopped leaving food downstairs. Everything has to be assessed in context, and for me that situation was as good as I could hope for at the time.
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cheeriosarenice
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#24
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#24
(Original post by ByronicHero)
I was already unhappy, and because there is little you can do about it. I did care, I did get angry and I did take some action but ultimately I just stopped leaving food downstairs. Everything has to be assessed in context, and for me that situation was as good as I could hope for at the time.
Or, you could have bought a fridge for your room?
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ByronicHero
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#25
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#25
(Original post by cheeriosarenice)
Or, you could have bought a fridge for your room?
Yes because it is that simple. It isn't like I 1) had no money to buy one 2) had no way of transporting one 3) didn't have room for one and 4) wasn't allowed one in the terms of the tenancy - to offer but a choice few of the myriad barriers.
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cheeriosarenice
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#26
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#26
(Original post by ByronicHero)
Yes because it is that simple. It isn't like I 1) had no money to buy one 2) had no way of transporting one 3) didn't have room for one and 4) wasn't allowed one in the terms of the tenancy - to offer but a choice few of the myriad barriers.
So your landlord allows alcoholics and tenants to take drugs in the house, but won't allow you to put a fridge in your room?

Anyway, why didn't you just move elsewhere?
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ByronicHero
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#27
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#27
(Original post by cheeriosarenice)
So your landlord allows alcoholics and tenants to take drugs in the house, but won't allow you to put a fridge in your room?

Anyway, why didn't you just move elsewhere?
He was one of them. That aside, it is very common for tenancies to disallow various appliances being used in rooms.

Rooms are hard to come by when you are on housing benefit, and harder still when you are 16. Being able to "just move" isn't a choice everyone freely has. How do you suppose I would move my stuff? pay for any deposit(s) that I might be required to pay? I fear you have an overly simplistic idea of what it means to have few - if any - meaningful choices available to you. I had two options: homelessness or a young person's housing unit and neither was in the last bit preferable.
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cheeriosarenice
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#28
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#28
(Original post by ByronicHero)
He was one of them. That aside, it is very common for tenancies to disallow various appliances being used in rooms.

Rooms are hard to come by when you are on housing benefit, and harder still when you are 16. Being able to "just move" isn't a choice everyone freely has. How do you suppose I would move my stuff? pay for any deposit(s) that I might be required to pay? I fear you have an overly simplistic idea of what it means to have few - if any - meaningful choices available to you. I had two options: homelessness or a young person's housing unit and neither was in the last bit preferable.
Well it just doesn't sound like a great place to live especially whilst studying.
I've been in the same situation - housing benefit, and on my own at a young age. I just moved my stuff myself, got my deposit back from my current landlord, and used it for the next one.

Young person's housing hostels and Foyer and actually really good, and you get support and people who help you and care about you.
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ByronicHero
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#29
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#29
(Original post by cheeriosarenice)
Well it just doesn't sound like a great place to live especially whilst studying.
I've been in the same situation - housing benefit, and on my own at a young age. I just moved my stuff myself, got my deposit back from my current landlord, and used it for the next one.

Young person's housing hostels and Foyer and actually really good, and you get support and people who help you and care about you.
1) It wasn't, but I didn't study so it was okay.
2) Which I'm sure was a relief, but you need to be careful not to assume that your own choices were governed by the same considerations as mine were - no matter how ostensibly similar our situations. I didn't have a deposit where I was living and even if I had I would not have gotten it back and certainly not prior to moving out.
3) One Foyer is not the same as the next,

There is more I could say but there is no need to expand on point 2 really.
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cheeriosarenice
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#30
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#30
(Original post by ByronicHero)
1) It wasn't, but I didn't study so it was okay.
2) Which I'm sure was a relief, but you need to be careful not to assume that your own choices were governed by the same considerations as mine were - no matter how ostensibly similar our situations. I didn't have a deposit where I was living and even if I had I would not have gotten it back and certainly not prior to moving out.
3) One Foyer is not the same as the next,

There is more I could say but there is no need to expand on point 2 really.
So were you working? I would have just worked as much as possible so I could afford somewhere better/ deposit.
How long did you stay there, and did you ever return to studying?

I appreciate that whilst we are all brushed under the same term, that there are huge differences between our circumstances, so I do apologise for assuming things.
No, but the ones I've seen have been great, and are supposed to be some sort of quality control.
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ByronicHero
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#31
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#31
(Original post by cheeriosarenice)
So were you working? I would have just worked as much as possible so I could afford somewhere better/ deposit.
How long did you stay there, and did you ever return to studying?

I appreciate that whilst we are all brushed under the same term, that there are huge differences between our circumstances, so I do apologise for assuming things.
No, but the ones I've seen have been great, and are supposed to be some sort of quality control.
No I didn't work, I don't remember, and I was in education technically I just didn't do anything.

No problem.
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legendary1
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#32
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#32
I don't know why your parents are kicking you out, I would however strongly recommend that working whilst doing your a levels will certainly not do you any favours. this might seem stupid, but I had heard that there are boarding sixth forms. perhaps get in contact with one of them.


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parentlurker
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#33
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#33
your mother should be getting both child tax credits and child benefit for you so why does she want to kick you out? If she isn't getting those benefits you need to take her to the Citizens Advice Bureau for help. If she is then maybe she doesn't realise they will continue if you are in full time education until the August after your A levels or your 19th birthday, whichever comes first.

She would still find it difficult to pay for fares for you but a part time job should allow you to fund that and provide a bit of spending money.

So what you should be doing is working on being such a helpful, co-operative, loving child that your mother doesn't want you to leave.

However if you've been a pain for far too long and it's beyond repair contact these people http://www.northampton.gov.uk/info/2...homelessness/3 They are obliged to help as you are under 18 but don't think you'll get a flat, a hostel place or foster home maybe.

Your school should also be able to offer some financial help.
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jaffacake111
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#34
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#34
You won't be able to work full time and study for A Levels. You sound like you have a good head on your shoulders and it would be a shame to forfeit it because of financial reasons. Try speaking with your college/6th form they should have options for people in your situation.
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jaffacake111
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#35
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#35
Right I have just answered your other one and with what you have just said this cannot be right.

How old are you? Parental care responsibility lasts in England & Wales until 18 (unless you marry then it's 16). Also you can only claim benefits at 16 as you can't get a National Insurance number beforehand.
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jaffacake111
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#36
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#36
(Original post by Yourolddeer)
I have just turned 16.
I'm guessing you are not married (judging by how you come across you are far too cover for that!)?

The only other thing I forgot to mention is that parental responsibility can be severed if decreed by a court (again guessing this not the case).

Your parent(s) need to sort this out. It is in no way fair to you and they could potentially be prosecuted for child neglect if not.
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Paralove
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#37
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#37
(Original post by Yourolddeer)
Thank you. I will definitely try to see what help/support I can get from there. As an update, my parents are no longer keeping me until I finish GCSEs, but will now kick me out by New Year.
Say to someone at school or something!! Certainly a teacher, even if it gets social services involved or whatever, some action needs to be taken.
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