What Happens To Child Prodigies Once They Grow Up? Watch

MrMango
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#21
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#21
(Original post by Schrödingers Cat)
To get started; the seven year old surgeon.

He is 21 now and still hasn't cured cancer. He was a child prodigy and claimed he had a cure for cancer at age 8.

A little bit of more info here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Akrit_Jaswal
BS could speak by 10 months old and read and write by age two, impossible.

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Schrödingers Cat
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#22
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(Original post by MrMango)
BS could speak by 10 months old and read and write by age two, impossible.

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I'm not sure about that part as this was cited by his father.

But it's definitely not BS as there was a documentary on it a while a go I watched were we saw him perform surgery at age 12
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SophiaLDN
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#23
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They grow up & get followed by a Channel 4 film crew about them trying to lose their virginity in their late 40s.
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Schrödingers Cat
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#24
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#24
(Original post by Chlorophile)
Is that going to be done by one person though? I can't think of a recent truly major breakthrough in science that really was developed mainly by a single prodigious individual. The technology required for the modern advanced experiments in physics, for instance, are so expensive and complex that there's no way it could be done by a person by themselves. James Lovelock himself says that the day of the lone scientist are unfortunately long gone.
You make a good point, I mean we had to build a $6.4bn LHC to find one particle. It makes me sad in a way, although Einstein used a very simple method using some zinc metal and a circuit to prove that light acts a particle :hmmmm:

It makes me sad to think I wont be able to contribute to the world of science :cry2:
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DErasmus
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(Original post by Schrödingers Cat)
You make a good point, I mean we had to build a $6.4bn LHC to find one particle. It makes me sad in a way, although Einstein used a very simple method using some zinc metal and a circuit to prove that light acts a particle :hmmmm:

It makes me sad to think I wont be able to contribute to the world of science :cry2:
Not really. Einstein was known mainly for his theories and the predictions he made / hypothetical conditions necessary to establish them, not the actual building and testing of theories themselves.
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Schrödingers Cat
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(Original post by DErasmus)
Not really. Einstein was known mainly for his theories and the predictions he made / hypothetical conditions necessary to establish them, not the actual building and testing of theories themselves.
Yes really, he won the Nobel prize for his theory of the photoelectric effect not on his paper of special relativity
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DErasmus
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(Original post by Schrödingers Cat)
Yes really, he won the Nobel prize for his theory of the photoelectric effect not on his paper of special relativity
Yes and what he did was explain experimental data already available to him... there's a difference between a theory and testing that theory, it's quite possible to conceive of theories but not have the equipment to test them and still contribute to science in the process.
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Schrödingers Cat
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#28
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(Original post by DErasmus)
Yes and what he did was explain experimental data already available to him... there's a difference between a theory and testing that theory, it's quite possible to conceive of theories but not have the equipment to test them and still contribute to science in the process.
True
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Maid Marian
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#29
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I feel sorry for child prodigies, I expect they have a lot of pressure on them to meet everyone's high expections, and are pushed into things like uni earlier than their peers. I think that's sad, they shouldn't be pressured so and should be allowed to live normal lives like their friends.
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Joinedup
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#30
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(Original post by PrincessAlexis)
This is a topic I researched for a long time as a former 'gifted' child myself who was pushed to go to uni at 15 (i dropped out).

This ladies story is great/sad http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandst...-child-prodigy

I am now 19 and finally ready to go back into education again.
good luck, I'm pretty dubious about accelerating students for the usual, well known reasons... http://parenting.blogs.nytimes.com/2...-gifted-child/ but otoh schools struggle to keep them occupied

but I do recall my surprise at starting school and finding that my older classmates weren't all fluent readers like me.
parents were advised by the educational establishment not to teach their children to read at home before starting school back then and I think working class (particularly) people were more deferent. pretty unlikely she managed to teach herself imo, so she probably had fairly pushy parents even though she doesn't seem to think so.

There's a point about academic A levels setting clever pupils up to struggle at uni by training them not to work steadily - it's not really possible to dash off uni work (or proper paid money work) with negligible effort, it's slog.

---
Anyway reversion to the mean is generally what happens to prodigies. doesn't mean they've got to be miserable tho.
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MrMango
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#31
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tbh I consider myself a child prodigy in a way.

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