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    (Original post by clh_hilary)
    You're talking about MChem as if they are postgraduate taught masters. They only have one dissertation/research project, not two.
    Oh is it? I'm afraid I'm not entirely sure about all that, but I guess the main point is that true masters are the postgraduate ones and things like MChem. But MAs from ancient universities (whether the scottish 4 year course or conferred masters from Oxbridge) are 'false' masters equivalent to a BA.


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    (Original post by Asklepios)
    Oh is it? I'm afraid I'm not entirely sure about all that, but I guess the main point is that true masters are the postgraduate ones and things like MChem. But MAs from ancient universities (whether the scottish 4 year course or conferred masters from Oxbridge) are 'false' masters equivalent to a BA.


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    Yeah, it's only got one. It's just an undergraduate degree taking four years to finish. The fact that it's called an 'integrated master's degree' shows that it's different from a master's degree, even though both are on level 7 on the scale (but the same goes to postgraduate certificates).

    I don't exactly know what the content of the Scottish MAs are, especially comparing them to Scottish BAs; but if both the MAs and MChem/etc take four years to finish and only get one research project/dissertation, what would be the difference? If the argument is on the material, then people also say materials at Oxbridge are always harder anyway so the BAs-turn-MAs should be seen as the same.

    It's very difficult to really judge how these qualifications hold.

    To the average employer, s/he won't know the differences. A survey was done showing that most employers have no idea that the Oxbridge MAs take no extra studies to be granted.

    To the student/graduate, on paper it is instead called a 'master', whether it's the Scottish/Oxbridge 'Master of Arts degree' or the Oxbridge 'Master of Biology' degree. It's perfectly legal and reasonable for them to claim that they hold a 'Master of Arts degree' because that's what's printed on the paper. But what's on the paper has little relevance to the reality when Oxford has something like a 'Bachelor of Civil Law' being an actual master's degree.

    To universities, it's still difficult to tell. A master's degree is never a necessity for doctoral entry. And at the same time it's a lot more common in the sciences to get straight into a doctoral programme with a bachelor's degree anyway, so this would prove nothing. I don't know enough about that field to know if they make the distinction between all of these, but in my field, academic jobs ask for an undergraduate degree and a master's degree separately, and they also usually specified wanting a 'good' undergraduate degree (=2:2 I think) and either say 'distinction' or nothing for the master's. That's clear enough evidence for me they're not looking for an undergraduate/integrated master of any kind.
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    (Original post by Airmed)
    I know that but it seems some people diss Scottish MAs.
    I doubt this is possible, and if they do it is with profound ignorance. All the Scottish universities that award MA's are prestigious; Edinburgh, Glasgow, Aberdeen, St Andrew's. William the queens grandson and heir to the throne went to St Andrew's and would have been awarded an MA!!! These four universities are Scotland's oldest and awarding MAs is just a historical hangover in naming. There is no difference with a BA/BSc
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    (Original post by Crisdean)
    I doubt this is possible, and if they do it is with profound ignorance. All the Scottish universities that award MA's are prestigious; Edinburgh, Glasgow, Aberdeen, St Andrew's. William the queens grandson and heir to the throne went to St Andrew's and would have been awarded an MA!!! These four universities are Scotland's oldest and awarding MAs is just a historical hangover in naming. There is no difference with a BA/BSc
    I'll just note that this thread is nearly 2 years old, and I'm now at a Scottish uni and will be graduating with a MA in 2018.
 
 
 

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