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    Assuming you're male.

    Just make it a daily routine to go out where ever the wind blows you and say hi and complement 3 random girls you like on the street every day. Then go back home and enjoy your home activities.

    Builds your confidence with women. Gets you outside. Makes their day. (And if you're single, is likely to get you some dates).
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    (Original post by iAmanze)
    Assuming you're male.

    Just make it a daily routine to go out where ever the wind blows you and say hi and complement 3 random girls you like on the street every day. Then go back home and enjoy your home activities.

    Builds your confidence with women. Gets you outside. Makes their day. (And if you're single, is likely to get you some dates).
    I'm a female, mostly straight.

    Maybe that's where I'm going wrong, not reeling in the ladies! Haha
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I'm a female, mostly straight.

    Maybe that's where I'm going wrong, not reeling in the ladies! Haha
    O_O
    Then grab some heels and a dress and go shake a leg in a club! :3
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    (Original post by marco14196)
    It's a little weird I would say, getting back out there. I am interviewing for my first job tomorrow which would be real great for me to get. My whole experience of the surgery has completely altered me as a person, arguably in a very positive way. Sure it was a horrendous experience and I lost a lot(financially its been a costly matter, socially its been costly and its cost me a whole year of uni that I have had to skip on so I don't start until September). My advice for your situation is just to think, thinking is really your best weapon as well as talking to other people. You can beat the agoraphobia. Try and do what I did which was thinking a lot and exploration of your mind. Try think of why you refuse to go out outside.
    Yeah you're right I'm learning a lot about myself and subconscious things I've squashed down and denied that really haven't been healthy for me. So you're right about exploring the mind. And yeah I realise I've pushed a lot of people away and I need to start investing in connections with good people. Worst part of this kind of change is realising you've been lugging a lot of really bad friendships/relationships around and they drop off the radar quick time.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Yeah you're right I'm learning a lot about myself and subconscious things I've squashed down and denied that really haven't been healthy for me. So you're right about exploring the mind. And yeah I realise I've pushed a lot of people away and I need to start investing in connections with good people. Worst part of this kind of change is realising you've been lugging a lot of really bad friendships/relationships around and they drop off the radar quick time.
    Agree with the friendship thing, it gave me the time to look at friendships I believed were good to continue and look at ending others. 6 months of thinking did me a lot of good
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I haven't left the house since my last doctors appointment in October. I stopped leaving the house in May for various reasons and I'm waiting on therapy and other help.

    I just wondered if any of you have suffered from this kind of thing or know anyone else's experience whether for days, weeks, months or even years and if they've managed to overcome it what helped? Also just general tips if you think they might be useful. One of the main reasons for my not leaving the house is health anxiety.

    My doctor said it's really rare for someone my age not to have left the house for this long which upset me but I've had a lot on and I know it's the weight of it all.

    Thanks in advance
    Agoraphobe here. I didn't leave my house for eight months straight at its worst, because it simply wasn't worth the stress. It says a lot about how awful the illness is that it can have human beings choose to stay in their house for months and even decades. I'm not sure what is causing you to stay in your house - you say something about health anxiety? My advice is to confront it now and bite the bullet because if you let this sort of thing develop it may well destroy your life. Talk to your GP - you can arrange a home visit in your case, and get started on the treatments they recommend.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Agoraphobe here. I didn't leave my house for eight months straight at its worst, because it simply wasn't worth the stress. It says a lot about how awful the illness is that it can have human beings choose to stay in their house for months and even decades. I'm not sure what is causing you to stay in your house - you say something about health anxiety? My advice is to confront it now and bite the bullet because if you let this sort of thing develop it may well destroy your life. Talk to your GP - you can arrange a home visit in your case, and get started on the treatments they recommend.
    When you say you didn't leave the house for 8 months straight do you mean not for doctors appointment's or anything? What was fuelling your agoraphobia? Hope you're better now, if so how did you get there? How old were you when in for 8 months?

    Yeah I am speaking to my GP and trying to work through it. Thanks
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Go out, perhaps just for a while. Even if it's to do something like buying scented candles or getting a bubble bath mixture x
    Hmm interesting take on it.

    Thanks, it's a miracle cured now... Haha
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I haven't left the house since my last doctors appointment in October. I stopped leaving the house in May for various reasons and I'm waiting on therapy and other help.

    I just wondered if any of you have suffered from this kind of thing or know anyone else's experience whether for days, weeks, months or even years and if they've managed to overcome it what helped? Also just general tips if you think they might be useful. One of the main reasons for my not leaving the house is health anxiety.

    My doctor said it's really rare for someone my age not to have left the house for this long which upset me but I've had a lot on and I know it's the weight of it all.

    Thanks in advance
    Don't you go to work or school?
    You shouldnt be afraid of going outside even if it's just to the shops or your grandma's or something, at least try and go somewhere
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    When you guys say "not leave the house", do you mean not step outside the house whatsoever, or do you mean not leave the house to socialise?

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    (Original post by JD8897)
    Don't you go to work or school?
    You shouldnt be afraid of going outside even if it's just to the shops or your grandma's or something, at least try and go somewhere
    I'm 23. I've finished uni and started a different course but then things spiralled downwards.

    Aw that's some cute little advice though you've given there though. But it's really a bit more complicate than goin round your grandmas. It's like a lot of things of gotten on top of me and I have to work through them before I can casually go to my grandmas haha.
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    (Original post by Up quark)
    When you guys say "not leave the house", do you mean not step outside the house whatsoever, or do you mean not leave the house to socialise?

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    It varies. Some people leave only to the doctors or specific places but mostly stay in. For me it's like I was never an indoors person would prefer to get out and meet people so that I've literally not left the front door since October isn't normal for me. It's not just social anxiety that people have, one of my things is health anxiety
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    Anyone else ?
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    There was a time, last year, when I didn't leave the house for many months. Never recovered from it but I am leaving the house now.

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    (Original post by Illegal Algebra)
    There was a time, last year, when I didn't leave the house for many months. Never recovered from it but I am leaving the house now.

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    Ah dear why'd you stay in for so long? What do you mean you never recovered from if but you're leaving the house now?
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    (Original post by Illegal Algebra)
    There was a time, last year, when I didn't leave the house for many months. Never recovered from it but I am leaving the house now.

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    you're not funny
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Ah dear why'd you stay in for so long? What do you mean you never recovered from if but you're leaving the house now?
    Not by choice. I lost myself completely, didn't know what was going on. I had severe depression, I couldn't do anything. Not much has changed since then, except that I'm leaving the house now and trying my best to get on with life, but I've lost my drive, lost all my motivation and ambition. I can't get better. I'm a shadow of my former self. I'm trying to get back to how I was, but I'm failing miserably. I've lost the will to live, I don't have that same desire for life that I had when I was at school.

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    (Original post by Illegal Algebra)
    Not by choice. I lost myself completely, didn't know what was going on. I had severe depression, I couldn't do anything. Not much has changed since then, except that I'm leaving the house now and trying my best to get on with life, but I've lost my drive, lost all my motivation and ambition. I can't get better. I'm a shadow of my former self. I'm trying to get back to how I was, but I'm failing miserably. I've lost the will to live, I don't have that same desire for life that I had when I was at school.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Oh I thought you were taking the **** seen similar sarcasm in some of your other posts so thought you were having a laugh.

    Ah that's awful though, have you tried to get help and what meant that you started going out in the end, did the depression just lift a little?
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    When my anxiety disorder was really bad I stopped leaving my room, let alone the house. I was having paranoid delusions about everything under the sun. Even if you're ok with being inside all the time, it's not really healthy for you physically. You need sunlight, you need fresh air and more importantly you have to face the world and everyone in it. That can be pretty hefty but just think of it one step at a time.
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    (Original post by geebeeiii)
    When my anxiety disorder was really bad I stopped leaving my room, let alone the house. I was having paranoid delusions about everything under the sun. Even if you're ok with being inside all the time, it's not really healthy for you physically. You need sunlight, you need fresh air and more importantly you have to face the world and everyone in it. That can be pretty hefty but just think of it one step at a time.
    Aw hope you're okay now? How long did it last and how did you get over it?
 
 
 
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