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    (Original post by clh_hilary)
    It depends on if the work justifies the pay. And you don't necessarily get no jobs if you don't go into accountancy.

    I'd think law graduates are quite well sought-after.
    Definitely if your doing too much work for the remuneration you get then its not worth it.

    I don't know how sought after they are, but MC firms pay around 60k for graduates so they probably are.
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    (Original post by voiceofreason234)
    Don't take that offer, it's a joke. Essentially minimum wage and they'll be a lot more hours than your contracted 37.5 a week too.

    You'd be better off getting a job at McDonalds ffs.
    What a silly comment. How short sighted can you be? Where would a McDonalds job lead him further down the line?

    Also I don't know about EY, but Deloitte gives overtime time off in lieu to the guys in Ireland which people in the UK don't get, so the hours would be reasonable if it's the same set up.

    (Original post by Tbx)
    AFAIK Larking Gowen a rank 50 accountancy firm paid 16-18k to ACA graduates in 2008.

    You could try negotiate but personally I wouldn't. Generally your salary goes up as you pass exams.



    Assuming OP sticks it out and passes all ACA exams, they can expect 40-45k after 3 years. Many different types of exit ops possible.
    Negotiating on a grad job offer with EY? Lol - that's hopeless. Bear in mind 40-45k after 3 years is a London salary, nothing like that in Belfast.
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    anyone who did accounting at uni, do u think its possible to study it at uni even if i never took any business/eco related subjects at a-level? also, how stressful is the course? any help will be greatly appreciated
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    (Original post by Shakz)
    anyone who did accounting at uni, do u think its possible to study it at uni even if i never took any business/eco related subjects at a-level? also, how stressful is the course? any help will be greatly appreciated
    Did science/maths A levels, not really that hard to get a 2.1. A lot more work needed for a 1st I find. Mostly just memorisation I find.
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    Acountancy salaries in Ireland are always really low. Not sure why. They're about half what you would get elsewhere, same at any firm.
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    (Original post by clh_hilary)
    I'd think law graduates are quite well sought-after.
    They're not. Law schools are universities have massively increased the number of students and lots of universities that really have no business teaching law have started doing so - mainly because law is an incredibly cheap course to run, so it makes universities huge amounts of money.

    You can pick up law grads at rock bottom prices, literally like 17k outside London, as long as you can wave the potential of a training contract in front of them.

    Only the top law students, coming from the top schools get into the magic or silver circle firms, will be well paid at the start of their career.
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    (Original post by Tbx)
    Definitely if your doing too much work for the remuneration you get then its not worth it.

    I don't know how sought after they are, but MC firms pay around 60k for graduates so they probably are.
    Usually 38k for grad's after having done the LPC. c60-72k for NQ solicitors.
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    (Original post by alibee)
    Acountancy salaries in Ireland are always really low. Not sure why. They're about half what you would get elsewhere, same at any firm.
    Not Ireland, but N. Ireland. I swapped from Belfast to Dublin mid contract and got a fairly big bump in salary. As a NQ I'm on about 18k more than my colleagues in the Belfast office.
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    I have a grad scheme offer in Belfast and the salary is very low as well. Not as low as 13k tho.


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    Standard of living is lower there I guess.

    Had a similar situation(although didn't get an offer as I withdrew my application after being invited for assessment day) to go to the Czech Republic but I calculated I was getting 10k per annum.

    Take the offer though, get a promotion and try move into london so you're on a higher salary.
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    (Original post by jam277)

    Take the offer though, get a promotion and try move into london so you're on a higher salary.
    Not as easy as it sounds - certainly at my place Belfast are part of the Irish firm, so to move to London you are effectively moving firm entirely. I'm sure it does happen but it's certainly not as easy as moving between mainland offices
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    (Original post by jam277)
    Standard of living is lower there I guess.

    Had a similar situation(although didn't get an offer as I withdrew my application after being invited for assessment day) to go to the Czech Republic but I calculated I was getting 10k per annum.

    Take the offer though, get a promotion and try move into london so you're on a higher salary.
    I'm hoping you meant cost of living, rather than standard lol
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    ive applied for the kpmg school leaver programme and they are offering 18/19 year olds a starting salary of £20,000 - paying for uni and ACA qualification, something to take into consideration.
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    (Original post by Hedgeman49)
    Not as easy as it sounds - certainly at my place Belfast are part of the Irish firm, so to move to London you are effectively moving firm entirely. I'm sure it does happen but it's certainly not as easy as moving between mainland offices
    Yeah I know that but you'd have experience which is important.

    (Original post by M1011)
    I'm hoping you meant cost of living, rather than standard lol
    Cost I mean.
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    (Original post by h_1411)
    ive applied for the kpmg school leaver programme and they are offering 18/19 year olds a starting salary of £20,000 - paying for uni and ACA qualification, something to take into consideration.
    It's a great option if you're sure audit is your thing. The only bad thing about it is that it's a 5 and a half year scheme so if you realise that it's not for you after a few months it is a long stretch.

    But it's an amazing way of getting a free degree.
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    (Original post by h_1411)
    ive applied for the kpmg school leaver programme and they are offering 18/19 year olds a starting salary of £20,000 - paying for uni and ACA qualification, something to take into consideration.
    I know many people on the school leaver program (being a grad myself) and looking back on it, I'd personally still choose the graduate route.

    You're at uni for much less time than a normal student so you'll mostly be working full time but then going and doing some stints at uni.

    You'll be doing the same work as grads but for much less pay and with much slower progression through the ranks, meaning you'll be doing the same things on clients year after year, as opposed to moving up more rapidly in tasks and responsibility as a grad.

    The "free uni" argument isn't as valid either since a tuition fee student loan isn't the same kind of a loan as a mortgage but is essentially a wealth tax, i.e carrying no credit risk to you. Granted, you will still have to pay the living costs.

    But that's just my view.
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    (Original post by snakesnake)
    I know many people on the school leaver program (being a grad myself) and looking back on it, I'd personally still choose the graduate route.

    You're at uni for much less time than a normal student so you'll mostly be working full time but then going and doing some stints at uni.

    You'll be doing the same work as grads but for much less pay and with much slower progression through the ranks, meaning you'll be doing the same things on clients year after year, as opposed to moving up more rapidly in tasks and responsibility as a grad.

    The "free uni" argument isn't as valid either since a tuition fee student loan isn't the same kind of a loan as a mortgage but is essentially a wealth tax, i.e carrying no credit risk to you. Granted, you will still have to pay the living costs.

    But that's just my view.
    Totally agree with what you are saying, I've analysed the pros and cons of the scheme and I think it's right for me.

    Even after I've graduated I will want to join a big 4 firm and graduate schemes are more competitive so it's not guaranteed that I'll get on. I'm also a more hands on person, I don't really like the idea of going to university full time when I know exactly what field I want to go into. Even if I do choose the university route I'm not doing it for the social life so it does not really matter to me.

    I also think this programme is best in terms of gaining invaluable experience at such a young age. I've carried out work experience during the summer for KPMG and it's helped me get very far in terms of gaining more work experience.
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    The £20,000 salary is in London as opposed to the graduate salary which would be roughly £27-29K. KPMG graduate salary in Belfast would be equally low.
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    (Original post by h_1411)
    Totally agree with what you are saying, I've analysed the pros and cons of the scheme and I think it's right for me.

    Even after I've graduated I will want to join a big 4 firm and graduate schemes are more competitive so it's not guaranteed that I'll get on. I'm also a more hands on person, I don't really like the idea of going to university full time when I know exactly what field I want to go into. Even if I do choose the university route I'm not doing it for the social life so it does not really matter to me.

    I also think this programme is best in terms of gaining invaluable experience at such a young age. I've carried out work experience during the summer for KPMG and it's helped me get very far in terms of gaining more work experience.
    Your only competing against yourself for Big 4 audit jobs. As long as you meet the bench-marked standard, graduate or school leaver, you'll get the job.
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    (Original post by toejoeson)
    Your only competing against yourself for Big 4 audit jobs. As long as you meet the bench-marked standard, graduate or school leaver, you'll get the job.
    If you apply early then yes, but this becomes less and less true as time goes on
 
 
 
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