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    (Original post by Exceptional)
    Royal Holloway.
    Why Royal Holloway? Just wondering.
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    (Original post by FreyaGreaves)
    That is all very useful information, thank you very much, Keele! Your support network sounds excellent! I'll definitely be looking more into Keele University

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    Keele is lovely, I went there myself. Very calming and a relaxed campus. I never felt unsafe or on edge there.

    Not trying to bash Keele because it really was a fantastic uni and has good prospects at the moment. Although I found the support and counseling services very old fashioned and not very helpful. I wouldn't recommend them.

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    That's useful to know, thank you very much for your honesty

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    (Original post by FreyaGreaves)
    I'm currently doing my AS levels, and am only really just starting to think about which university I would like to go to.

    I have struggled with anxiety and various other mental health issues for a number of years, and I was wondering which universities would be most supportive?

    Of course, I'll be going to open days later on in the year, but it would be useful to know anyone's honest experiences and recommendations. Are there any unis with a particularly relaxed atmosphere?


    I'm looking into doing a degree in history, so one with a good history department would be good, and also I'm not sure how I'd cope in an inner city university, so more rural or out of town ones would be nice too. I'm not fussed about it having good nightlife anyway, as I'm not really into that.
    (Original post by FreyaGreaves)
    I was actually looking at Royal Holloway and Keele, haha I absolutely adore the surroundings and the Founders Building. Can anyone give me any information on their history department? Is it any good?
    Hi there!

    I came across your post and thought I might be able to help by providing you with some information about Royal Holloway's history department, and to let you know about what support we offer our students.

    Our History department is one of the largest in the UK, which means we offer a wide range of historical subjects but, as we have a relatively small-medium sized campus, we still prioritise treating our students as individuals. History ranked 7th (out of 99 departments) in the UK for overall student satisfaction, and 99% of our students thought our staff were good at explaining things, and gave us a total score of 96% for the quality of our teaching (National Student Survey, 2014).

    Also, the Department of History ranked joint first among other UK history departments for its research with impact (REF 2014). This means that the research and work generated by the department has been judged to have a real benefit to greater society. You can find more information about this here.

    Statistics aside, Royal Holloway is only 40 minutes away from central London by train, but we are actually located in leafy Surrey (the campus even has its own wood, where I spotted a deer roaming around the other day!) So you'll definitely be able to find places to relax.

    In terms of student support, our Support, health and welfare page might be a useful read. We also have the Disability and Dyslexia Services, who are there to provide support to students with additional learning needs, and this includes students with anxiety. If you wanted to find out what they do in more detail, you can get in touch with the DDS team and they'll be more than happy to have a chat. Their contact details are here.

    I hope this information is helpful - please let me know if you need anything else!

    Best wishes,

    Emily
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    I have really bad anxiety as well and am going to Exeter in September and was just wondering how introverts actuall cope at Uni considering it's practically a constant social situation?
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    The collegiate system is a good way to make friends because your college becomes like your little family within uni Other than Oxbridge, the universities which have this are Lancaster, York and Durham (unless there's any more I'm forgetting!)

    I'm at Lancaster and I think you might like it- it's not an inner city university and it's great for welfare. We have a counselling service, and each college has welfare officers that you can speak to if you're having difficulty with anything or if you just want to talk. I know plenty of people who don't go out and are still perfectly happy with lots of friends, and there's over 200 societies to meet people with similar interests
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    (Original post by Exceptional)
    I fifth that.
    I sixth that
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    University of Bath. All the way.

    I was in the same spot as you not 4 months ago. I get social anxiety sometimes, although it's very mild. Before going to uni, I was extremely worried about going into university especially because of how some aspects of uni life seem to be potrayed in the media, and on TV and whatnot. Suffice to say, I am pretty insecure at times, and I thought I wouldn't be able to participate in anything come uni time, and that everyone would be nothing but short of being overtly extroverted.

    That wasn't the case in bath. I've met people from all walks of life, and personalities I thought I would never come accross in university. It has been incredible so far. The atmosphere, and the people in it, has so far been nothing but stellarly supportive and friendly.

    If I could recommend anyone a university for any reason whatsoever, it has to be University of Bath. It's no surprise really after I found out it has won the no.1 student's satisfaction award in the UK for 2 years running :P
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    I agree with Royal Holloway.

    Also agree with collegiate unis, I'm at York and from what I've experienced the support system's really good. We have a post-graduate student living in every block who's on call throughout Freshers to help you settle in, and the college team are really good too. There's someone in my flat doing History and he seems to like the department and course.
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    When these universities come into threads its like the big boss is talking:eek:
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    (Original post by BCMFM16)
    When these universities come into threads its like the big boss is talking:eek:
    That marketing.

    Thanks to RHU & Keele for responding though! :yy:
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    Oh my gosh, I'm getting so many replies, haha

    Thanks to everyone who's responded! You're all being so helpful, it's lovely! I'll be taking everything everyone has said into consideration. I'm making lists like crazy of things to look into and research haha!

    Thanks so much!

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    (Original post by FreyaGreaves)
    I'm currently doing my AS levels, and am only really just starting to think about which university I would like to go to.

    I have struggled with anxiety and various other mental health issues for a number of years, and I was wondering which universities would be most supportive?

    Of course, I'll be going to open days later on in the year, but it would be useful to know anyone's honest experiences and recommendations. Are there any unis with a particularly relaxed atmosphere?


    I'm looking into doing a degree in history, so one with a good history department would be good, and also I'm not sure how I'd cope in an inner city university, so more rural or out of town ones would be nice too. I'm not fussed about it having good nightlife anyway, as I'm not really into that.
    Im applying to physics not history so im not sure about its reputation for history but when i was on the lancaster open day i was shown round by a phd student who had anxiety and did her undergrad degree at lancaster, and she said they went out of their way to help her and get extra time for her in exams ect. because of her mental healt issues and how supportive they were. She also said she started her post grad studies at Durham but they were so unsupportive and didnt really help her even when she made her problems know to them so she moved back to lancaster. An i loved the rest of the uni as its campus and collegiate, and the town isnt very far away but it seems quiet and really nice!! i really recommend it
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    If you are looking into Exeter make sure to check out applying specifically to the Cornwall Campus. I heard very good things about the history department when I was there. The campus is down in Penryn near Falmouth and quite small, I prefered this as it was more intimate and the community was great. Super relaxed atmosphere as it is right near the sea as well. The student union there - FXU - (the campus is shared with Falmouth University) are truly great with everything including tackling mental health issues among students and providing resources. They actually have a "Mind Your Head" campaign running at the moment.
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    (Original post by abimoon)
    Im applying to physics not history so im not sure about its reputation for history but when i was on the lancaster open day i was shown round by a phd student who had anxiety and did her undergrad degree at lancaster, and she said they went out of their way to help her and get extra time for her in exams ect. because of her mental healt issues and how supportive they were. She also said she started her post grad studies at Durham but they were so unsupportive and didnt really help her even when she made her problems know to them so she moved back to lancaster. An i loved the rest of the uni as its campus and collegiate, and the town isnt very far away but it seems quiet and really nice!! i really recommend it

    I'm really surprised to hear that about Durham actually! It's nice to hear that Lancaster is so supportive though
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    (Original post by Jen92)
    If you are looking into Exeter make sure to check out applying specifically to the Cornwall Campus. I heard very good things about the history department when I was there. The campus is down in Penryn near Falmouth and quite small, I prefered this as it was more intimate and the community was great. Super relaxed atmosphere as it is right near the sea as well. The student union there - FXU - (the campus is shared with Falmouth University) are truly great with everything including tackling mental health issues among students and providing resources. They actually have a "Mind Your Head" campaign running at the moment.
    That sounds lovely! Were the SU quite active and were there many societies and activities to join in with?
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    (Original post by FreyaGreaves)
    I'm really surprised to hear that about Durham actually! It's nice to hear that Lancaster is so supportive though
    Its terrible that happened at Durham, it's totally unlike my experience. I did my undergraduate and postgraduate studies there. I had some difficulties and used their counselling service. It was great for me, very supportive and really helped me deal with the issues I was having. The collegiate system was also great, colleges each have their own welfare teams, run by the students, with drop in hours and excellent formal pastoral systems. I work at Durham now and am part of the pastoral team in one of the colleges. I can honestly say that there is a real focus on student experience and support. Moreover the colleges have a fantastic range of clubs, societies and events (in addition to the university wide ones), it is definitely like having your own Durham family. Most colleges allocate their students mentors (the role I am involved in), so you will have a point of contact outside the formal hierarchy, in case you need someone to talk things over with. You also get college parents (students in higher years) who help get you orientated when you arrive and make you feel part of the community. Finally you will have a departmental tutor who is there to help with your academic and personal development. If your interested I'd definitely come to one of the open days.
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    From what i've heard, i'd really recommend St Andrews or Durham. Really great small town feel with both places, but you already seem to have a few suggestions. Good luck with finding somewhere you do like !
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    Whilst I have never been diagnosed with anxiety, I have suffered from it in the past, and I found Royal Holloway to be very helpful- despite no 'official' diagnosis, even. Plus it's the sort of university that in and of itself tends to be a calming place; the small, pretty campus and great community mean that you have this feeling of safety and homeliness that larger, city-based universities struggle to emulate.

    I also agree with the suggestion of collegiate universities, though I'm not sure I'd recommend Oxford or Cambridge, despite the collegiate systems meaning that both have a strong community feel. I actually think the university (referring to Oxford here) is relatively poor at dealing with mental health issues, so other collegiate universities like Durham and York might be nice alternatives.
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    Going to Uni is probably one of the most stressful events you can think of.
    For someone with anxiety no University is going to be 'relaxing'.

    If you aren't already receiving treatment for your anxiety, you really do need to get on top of it BEFORE you even think of applying to Uni.
    First stop is your GP.
 
 
 
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