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Why doesn't the NHS charge for missed GP appointments? watch

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    (Original post by Kittiara)
    Whilst I can see the arguments for a charge, there are definite arguments against it. Some people with mental health problems have trouble keeping appointments due to stress, anxiety, depression etc. Appointments can be a real problem for people with sleep disorders. Elderly people might be forgetful. Those are probably the kind of people who would then put off making an appointment just in case they end up missing it, so something easily treatable might turn into something worse.

    There will always be problems with the NHS. Some people don't go to their GP until they see no other option, whilst they should have gone a lot sooner. Some people constantly turn up for the smallest thing that will just go away on its own. Weekends at A & E are horrible because of all the people off their heads on drink and drugs. That's what you get with a universal health service, though. It would be nice if people were a bit more sensible, but everyone has their issues.

    I'd personally much rather pay a bit more in tax to preserve the NHS than see the introduction of charges that would affect the poor and vulnerable.
    All those reasons seem like they'd come under, valid reasons for missing an appointment.

    Given that we increasingly seem faced with a choice between the nhs dying a slow death or some sort of change in how it is funded, id rather see fines for wasting time than an increase in tax. You may be willing to accept an increase but frankly then vast majority are not.


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    This is probably one of those things that would cost more to implement relative to the amount of income it produced, considering all of the infrastructure that would have to be put in place to do it.
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    (Original post by mrs_bellamy)
    This would penalise the most vulnerable, who are more likely to miss appointments and less able to provide evidence of their reason. If you are elderly or sick the extra burden of providing evidence for missed appointments or of a charge would be very significant. Do you really want a pensioner who forgets an appointment to be charged each time? There is also a big risk of people not making appointments due to fear of the charge, meaning they present later in their illness, or present somewhere else such as A&E, increasing cost to the NHS and potentially resulting in a poorer outcome for the patient.
    When you say most vulnerable, do you mean the most feckless?
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    (Original post by mrs_bellamy)
    So its an extra piece of administration for GPs? Do you think many of them would be willing to judge their patients reason for non-attendance as deserving of a fine when it could jeopardise their relationship with their patients? If the patient felt they had been charged unfairly who would deal with this, the GP also?
    Do you mean the type of patients that GPs hate because they cause problems?
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    (Original post by Lionheart96)
    yep, couldn't agree more.
    We should charge people who constantly miss appointments as they are wasting money and resources. Maybe next time they won't miss the appointments.appointments .
    Whilst we are at it, people who clog up a & e because they don't know when to stop drinking should also face a fine. That should help the alcoholism problem in this country somewhat
    Maybe you should actually answer Mrs Bellamy's arguments above. Oh wait you can't because you don't have a response.
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    (Original post by MatureStudent36)
    Do you mean the type of patients that GPs hate because they cause problems?
    I know your not a GP because they would never make that kind of comment. Bitter you weren't smart enough to get into medicine?

    It's always been a sad conservative tactic to label people in vulnerable situations as responsible for their circumstances. What i'm always trying to figure out is whether there are really this many sociopaths in society, or worse, people that understand people's unfortunate circumstances and don't give a ****.
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    (Original post by Lawrence1234)
    I know your not a GP because they would never make that kind of comment. Bitter you weren't smart enough to get into medicine?

    It's always been a sad conservative tactic to label people in vulnerable situations as responsible for their circumstances. What i'm always trying to figure out is whether there are really this many sociopaths in society, or worse, people that understand people's unfortunate circumstances and don't give a ****.
    No I'm not a go and in not uoset I never chose a career in medicine.

    Some vulnerable people miss appointments. But not all peole who miss appointments are vunerable.

    Missed appointments are an unnecessary strain on the nhs.

    So no, I'm not a sociopath for realisig that somebody not turning up for an appointment is increasing running costs of the nhs.
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    (Original post by MatureStudent36)
    No I'm not a go and in not uoset I never chose a career in medicine.

    Some vulnerable people miss appointments. But not all peole who miss appointments are vunerable.

    Missed appointments are an unnecessary strain on the nhs.

    So no, I'm not a sociopath for realisig that somebody not turning up for an appointment is increasing running costs of the nhs.
    Good, i'd agree with you. But, if you are to start charging for missed appointments there is no way of judging who is vulnerable and who isn't. People pay taxes all their lives, especially the elderly, so i think they've paid enough to not have to pay for missing one appointment. The NHS does need more funding yes, but this should come from higher taxation, a clamp down on tax avoidance, and stop wasting 130bn on Trident.
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    (Original post by Lawrence1234)
    Good, i'd agree with you. But, if you are to start charging for missed appointments there is no way of judging who is vulnerable and who isn't. People pay taxes all their lives, especially the elderly, so i think they've paid enough to not have to pay for missing one appointment. The NHS does need more funding yes, but this should come from higher taxation, a clamp down on tax avoidance, and stop wasting 130bn on Trident.
    I think it's care to say that Drs know who's vunerable and who's not. They're quite apt at knowing who the feckless are.

    I know GPs have called for this in the past.

    I've got a friend who's a nurse in a casualty department. She knows the dunk and drugged idiots she's dealing with who aren't vunerable, just as she knows the estimated 9 out of 10 visitors to A&E that require no medical treatment aren't vunerable in most cases.
    The radiographer my cousin married who spends a good chunk of his time re x raying people a limbs who chose to task castes off early aren't vunerabke, but they clog up the system and create additional cost.

    Most people pay into the nhs, however token payements. Token payements don't mean you always get more back.

    I don't want to pay more taxes. I want to see efficiency savings made such as all appointment slots used.

    I don't know why you're quiting a 40 year lifetime cost of trident in this debate. Try qouting the annual running cost of about £3 billion which is about 2.5% of the nhs budget. If you want to get angry, get angry about the £30bn a year on loan repayments.
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    (Original post by MatureStudent36)
    I think it's care to say that Drs know who's vunerable and who's not. They're quite apt at knowing who the feckless are.

    I know GPs have called for this in the past.

    I've got a friend who's a nurse in a casualty department. She knows the dunk and drugged idiots she's dealing with who aren't vunerable, just as she knows the estimated 9 out of 10 visitors to A&E that require no medical treatment aren't vunerable in most cases.
    The radiographer my cousin married who spends a good chunk of his time re x raying people a limbs who chose to task castes off early aren't vunerabke, but they clog up the system and create additional cost.

    Most people pay into the nhs, however token payements. Token payements don't mean you always get more back.

    I don't want to pay more taxes. I want to see efficiency savings made such as all appointment slots used.

    I don't know why you're quiting a 40 year lifetime cost of trident in this debate. Try qouting the annual running cost of about £3 billion which is about 2.5% of the nhs budget. If you want to get angry, get angry about the £30bn a year on loan repayments.
    I'd very much have to disagree with this (at least for GPs and doctors who don't see the patient more than once or twice), my doctor was clueless to the fact I was suicidal despite me being there for that exact reason. Left the doctors office in a worse state than I left. GP appointments usually don't last more than 15 minutes, so it's hardly surprising they're not going to know your life story and whether or not you're vulnerable from the 900 seconds you're in the room and they're not asking about your life, they're asking about your health.
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    (Original post by MatureStudent36)
    When you say most vulnerable, do you mean the most feckless?
    That is clearly not what she meant.
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    Honestly this would be a good idea, now sure there are going to be exceptions here for whom this rule wouldn't be all that fair on, but they can be dealt with on a case by case basis.

    I don't have the stats but I'd wager that a fair chunk of missed appointments don't have particularly good reasons behind them.
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    This is, in my opinion, stupid for one main reason.

    If you pay tax, you've contributed to the NHS, you've essentially paid for your GP appointment through tax, if you miss it then so what, you've missed something you've paid for. It would be unfair to charge again for it.


    Yes, this wouldn't apply to people who don't pay tax, but they don't really have much money anyway.
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    (Original post by Aj12)
    All those reasons seem like they'd come under, valid reasons for missing an appointment.

    Given that we increasingly seem faced with a choice between the nhs dying a slow death or some sort of change in how it is funded, id rather see fines for wasting time than an increase in tax.

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    Good luck funding the entire health service via fines :rolleyes:

    (Original post by Etomidate)
    This is probably one of those things that would cost more to implement relative to the amount of income it produced, considering all of the infrastructure that would have to be put in place to do it.
    So? Can you not sense the OUTRAGE. PEOPLE MUST BE PUNISHED!!!!!!
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    (Original post by SophieSmall)
    I'd very much have to disagree with this (at least for GPs and doctors who don't see the patient more than once or twice), my doctor was clueless to the fact I was suicidal despite me being there for that exact reason. h.
    So did you tell him that you were suicidal?
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    (Original post by DorianGrayism)
    So did you tell him that you were suicidal?

    Yep, also told him that at the time I was self harming and not eating.
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    (Original post by SophieSmall)
    That is clearly not what she meant.
    Well she did. She's tried to make the assumption that everybody who misses an appointment is vunerable.

    I've missed two GP appointments in my time. I forgot. No charge.

    Never missed a dental appointment or an opticians appointment.
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    (Original post by MatureStudent36)
    Well she did. She's tried to make the assumption that everybody who misses an appointment is vunerable.

    I've missed two GP appointments in my time. I forgot. No charge.

    Never missed a dental appointment or an opticians appointment.
    No, she did not.
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    I expect because they're so stretched they're always behind schedule, missed appointments are probably something of a relief!
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    No harm in people 18-65 paying for missed GP Appointments. If it were a tenner, anymore would be bad.

    Obviously this wouldn't apply to the elderly, or unemployed. And any other certain groups that are vulnerable.
 
 
 
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