Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
x Turn on thread page Beta

Laptop decision help watch

Announcements
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by marco14196)
    Seems like someone doesn't know how to look after a PC if they all "just" break. I've owned many a system in my time, most of them Windows systems. I've owned 2 desktops(both high end), two laptops(one Mac and one PC), one All in One PC and a Surface RT in my time. Never with ANY of them have I ran into an issue that breaks them. I've ran into issues but most of the time they're easily solvable. I nearly lost my Windows partition on my Mac but I was able to save it with some trickery on my part. I would argue with your Mac that if a hardware issue emerges, you'll have more hell solving it than a semi modular Windows laptop because none of the Mac is user serviceable
    You seem a lot more knowledgable with the in's and out's of computer's than me. I know what I'm doing on a laptop but don't really know how to fix them. I think due to my experiences with MacBook's and Windows computers, I'd suggest to anyone that doesn't know their stuff to a high level with laptops to get a Macbook instead. My windows laptops were a lot more effort to keep clean and working fast/correctly. My Macbook is just a lot easier to handle and more reliable than my windows laptops ever were. just my experience
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    If you're getting a laptop to simply browse internet, write essays etc, there's no point spending an extortionate amount more on a Macbook when another laptop will do the same job for half the price.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    The point about viruses is that - most of them target Windows than Mac but it doesn't mean there aren't viruses targeting Mac out there. Windows alone won't catch a virus, it's a case of "user blaming its tools" adage.

    Of all the laptops and desktops I have had in the last 20 years, I have only had one virus that was on a floppy disk and even that did not infect because I always have anti virus installed and up to date.

    How vulnerable you are to viruses depends mostly on how careful you are with what sites and links you click on, what you download or where you connect to, such as unknown public wifi hotspots and also what USB memory sticks you plug into your laptop. People swap and share USB memory sticks so often these days as they are a portable way of doing coursework on many computers in many places. If you stick with genuine sites and sources and have up to date internet security and anti virus then the chances of viruses are minimal or rare.

    Compare this to friends I know who are clicking on adverts, banners and popups and agreeing to messages that they don't read because the Accept or OK button is the quickest way to get back to what they were doing. When you think about it, how recent was the last time you accepted a prompt without reading what it was?

    I don't know what the legal implications are with TV Licence in Uni / campus, but watching any live TV needs a licence, whether or not you have a TV or Apple TV. Watching On Demand is exempt.

    I'm not trying to preach about licensing here, the point I'm leading to is that if you bought a £400 laptop and a £100 22" TV, you would still be £s in pocket and at the same time plug your laptop into your TV and do your coursework / research across two screens for more productivity. The remaining £300-350 you can put towards living expenses etc or provision for a rainy day!

    As for laptop choice, avoid anything that mentions Atom or Celeron. They're not bad or anything, just basic. Look out for Intel i3 or i5 and anything with 4GB RAM memory upwards. Ideally with a HDMI socket which will connect with most TVs and any with USB 3 ports (as opposed to USB 2) preferred but optional. Screen size depends on how portable you want it to be!

    Oh and a separate mouse so you're not faffing around with touchpad cursor!
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    There are also free apps that will help maintain your laptop from clogging up and a few settings to purge temporary files, such as emptying temporary internet files when you close your browser.

    Internet Security / Anti Virus programs are approx £25-£40 which will give you 1 year protection, and if you look around, some cover up to 3 PC/laptops. You might be thinking you only have 1 laptop, but if your family / friends have PC / laptop, they can use the other 2 installs. It is a good way to spread the cost as it would in effect only cost you 1/3. The following year, one of the other two people can but the next year's protection which covers yours, and so on.

    Not sure what maintenance is needed on a Mac or if all, but is that worth the extra £s?
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    I've got a £350 windows laptop that's currently on its 4th year, virus free and running perfectly happily. Looking at what's available for the same price now, you're getting a lot for the money. I'd advice against getting a mac unless you particularly need any of the apple software, which, from looking at your requirements, you don't. Put about £400-500 in a windows laptop, and you should be able to get something with an i5 and 8gb ram which should do you fine. To put that in perspective, that would be 3-4x better than what I'm currently running and I reckon I've still got a good year or two out of this.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by UUSee98)
    There are also free apps that will help maintain your laptop from clogging up and a few settings to purge temporary files, such as emptying temporary internet files when you close your browser.

    Internet Security / Anti Virus programs are approx £25-£40 which will give you 1 year protection, and if you look around, some cover up to 3 PC/laptops. You might be thinking you only have 1 laptop, but if your family / friends have PC / laptop, they can use the other 2 installs. It is a good way to spread the cost as it would in effect only cost you 1/3. The following year, one of the other two people can but the next year's protection which covers yours, and so on.

    Not sure what maintenance is needed on a Mac or if all, but is that worth the extra £s?
    You don't even need to pay for antivirus. I got more virus's with a 2 year McAfee subscription than I have since I switched to MSE (Free). As long as you have safe browsing habits and a decent free suite, you shouldn't run into any problems or have to pay for anything
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Totally agree with safe browsing habits, that was my point in response to an earlier post from a member saying they had more viruses with Windows than Mac. A laptop alone won't attract viruses if you left it alone without user intervention.

    As for internet security and anti virus software, I do believe you get what you pay in and they're not all 100% safe in the fact that no matter how good it is, it won't override a user if he/she wants to run something unsafe. There are also false positives as you get in, say medical tests as an analogy.

    I also come across users who never get round to renewing the subscription and get in touch wondering why their laptop is slow and misbehaving and pages aren't loading properly or why they get constant popups!
    No matter how many times they expect me to bail them out of an infection and then ignore safe browsing advice does frustrate!

    Having said all that and in danger of contradicting myself, I too have low opinions of McAfee!
    The organisation I used to work at used it and there were various incidents of widespread infections. Many years later they moved onto a different enterprise product. Having said that, with 10,000s of staff bringing files to and from places, it's not surprising something will get through! They eventually restricted USB usage...
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    Get a MacBook if you can afford to do so. If you're taking it into university all the time, then the light weight and all day battery life of a Mac will be really useful. Sure, you can get a Windows machine for less, but it comes with massive compromises.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by jameswhughes)
    Get a MacBook if you can afford to do so. If you're taking it into university all the time, then the light weight and all day battery life of a Mac will be really useful. Sure, you can get a Windows machine for less, but it comes with massive compromises.
    Not really. If you want a windows laptop with huge battery life and light weight... there are lots out there. And you won't have to compromise on money.
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Zephyrv)
    Not really. If you want a windows laptop with huge battery life and light weight... there are lots out there. And you won't have to compromise on money.
    I haven't seen any Windows machines that can last 12 hours on a single charge like the Air. Ultrabooks that come close in matching the weight and form of a MacBook cost just as much, and are often even more expensive.
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

This forum is supported by:
Updated: January 27, 2015
Poll
Do you agree with the proposed ban on plastic straws and cotton buds?
Useful resources

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.