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    Best job in the world?

    I think most people would agree with "blow---"
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    (Original post by EnolaGay)
    Now that's your imagination!
    Naive. What draws you to the conclusion that its "boring", "repetitive" and "automated"?
    If that's the case then I know of many jobs that are boring, repetitive. As for automation, its not really the way you think it is. Had automation taken to the limits, we wouldn't be needing pilots anymore. The same with other fields, take surgery in the case of medicine, or a car manufacturing plant. Automation is taking toll everywhere which simply doesn't mean human skill and input are needed behind the wheel of a computer eh?
    To be clear, you put it forward as the "best job in the world", that's what I am questioning not the entire profession. You can't then say many jobs are boring and therefore it's fine, given the premise of this thread... Nor did I claim it was completely automated, but it's hardly the open top propeller aircraft of days gone by is it?

    So again, is your view based on experience or imagination? How entertaining can it really be to do the same journeys every day, sitting in a small room looking at clouds? It doesn't sound particularly mentally stimulating or like it really offers much in the way of variety, not to mention all the downsides of being away half the time. Fun for a month - sure. Fun for a career? Sounds to me like childhood wishing, rather than a stark look at the facts. Just my opinion though, I also think fishing sounds dull - no doubt some people love it.
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    (Original post by M1011)
    To be clear, you put it forward as the "best job in the world", that's what I am questioning not the entire profession. You can't then say many jobs are boring and therefore it's fine, given the premise of this thread... Nor did I claim it was completely automated, but it's hardly the open top propeller aircraft of days gone by is it?

    So again, is your view based on experience or imagination? How entertaining can it really be to do the same journeys every day, sitting in a small room looking at clouds? It doesn't sound particularly mentally stimulating or like it really offers much in the way of variety, not to mention all the downsides of being away half the time. Fun for a month - sure. Fun for a career? Sounds to me like childhood wishing, rather than a stark look at the facts. Just my opinion though, I also think fishing sounds dull - no doubt some people love it.
    A single Job itself cannot hold the title "best job in the world" so i'll take this to be one of the best job you could have. Yes, I did put forward it as "the best job in the world" but; its obviously known many would fit in rather than just this particular one. No, you did not make any claim of it being completely automated but rather heavily automated which still means majority of airplane control is automated which in reality is barely not crossing the 50% line.

    but it's hardly the open top propeller aircraft of days gone by is it?
    I'm sorry. Couldn't get you there. Elaborate a bit if you dont mind
    If you're in referral to classic flight control where the days DC aircraft and pre fly-by-wire then yeah, could say so.

    So again, is your view based on experience or imagination?
    Both. I've started my flying and I find it thoroughly exciting at the same time it isn't boring at all. Thrilling at your first, but never fades away. However there's still time for dreams to turn reality or like terms get more of an inner experience to the industry and profession. From folks I know who've caved in for years, there are good tales' of experience. I used to excessively imagine in my kiddy days but I will also agree there are a bit of downsides, but +more of the upsides weighed.

    How entertaining can it really be to do the same journeys every day, sitting in a small room looking at clouds?
    You're basically talking the same thing. Financial controllers, doctors in operating theatres.. they're all in an enclosed room/cabin working on a project/procedure for hours aren't they? Sometimes you have a view, other times not

    Same journeys? I don't get it. Its like saying you can go around the earth and explore each and every place during that roughly, say what? 40 year average work span? You're getting paid to travel here. Over that, many airlines have varied destinations and some over 160 routes to choose from or bid, in better words to put it. So, for a person who loves to travel. I don't see how that can't be entertaining. Its not just the clouds out there dear, you get to see a hell lot more haha.



    Specially in the U.S maybe, just maybe you end up working for a crappy domestic regional airline with low pay, then I cant speak for it. Must be the same thing over again, horrible layovers at hotels etc,. I'm talking about major airlines here. International. Put it better - sitting in a small cabin with the worlds view, up at 38.000ft whilst having sushi and double chocolate fudge cake cruising at 680mph.

    It doesn't sound particularly mentally stimulating or like it really offers much in the way of variety, not to mention all the downsides of being away half the time. Fun for a month - sure. Fun for a career? Sounds to me like childhood wishing, rather than a stark look at the facts. Just my opinion though, I also think fishing sounds dull - no doubt some people love it.

    It doesn't - to you, and a few. But to many it sure can be mentally stimulating. See... half of the time away from home, variety and all does cover up if you're working for a major, but to get there you need to get thru regional/domestic... bit of sacrifices to be made but I can tell it'll end up being very rewarding in the end no doubt. Fun as a career for those that love the skies, have the passion to fly.

    Again, its your opinion. Won't be the same of mine, or the others. But many do agree its a really cool job and one of the best jobs in the world. I do respect your views and opinions and like you said, fishing can be fun for many when its dull just to you.
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    Study Helper
    Prince Philip.

    Your old lady and the rest of the family does the hard stuff, you get to live the high life in luxury, meet the rich and famous most of whom want to grovel at your feet and all you have to do is keep your mouth shut (hard in Philips case), cut a few blue ribbons now and again and read out a few speeches already written for you.

    No worries about putting food on the table, paying the mortgage or saving enough for your pension.

    Jammy bugger.
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    Astronaut or CEO of Nando's
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    (Original post by EnolaGay)
    A pilot. Both Air Force & Astronaut as well as Civilian. Best view + awesome job + great pay. Adventurous too. There's not just the only "best job" many jobs are cool.. you just have to like it :cool:
    I'm thinking of become iggy a pilot but can I ask a few questions:

    do you ever miss home when away on long haul flights?
    do you worry about the cost of uni you needed to become a pilot or did you do it through the army
    how much holiday do you get and what position are you as a pilot ?
    what's the pay range for your job
    have you ever had any close calls/bad experiences


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    (Original post by Tommy1499)
    I'm thinking of become iggy a pilot but can I ask a few questions:

    do you ever miss home when away on long haul flights?
    do you worry about the cost of uni you needed to become a pilot or did you do it through the army
    how much holiday do you get and what position are you as a pilot ?
    what's the pay range for your job
    have you ever had any close calls/bad experiences


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    I'm not a commercial pilot yet but i can answer.

    1. When working with a major airline, yes you would miss home but there are fun things to do outside at your layover with the rest of the crew. The more you do long haul (out of home) you'll be given days off the month to balance the time with family.

    2. Considering a career in aviation is.. I'll admit a risky one. Because of job security. Myself, the Uni way. Yes it is expensive.

    3. I'm a student pilot. There's still years to go. A First Officer gets paid the six digits for a major airline and the Captain, more than him but of course it depends on who you're working for; which region and aircraft you fly.

    4. It can start from you "paying" to fly and earning very little to as much as 250,000-300,000$ and the pay increases with seniority. The more experienced the guys are, better the pay. Medium salary can be about 100,000-180,000$.*

    *commercial airline pilot flying international routes.
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    (Original post by EnolaGay)
    A single Job itself cannot hold the title "best job in the world" so i'll take this to be one of the best job you could have. Yes, I did put forward it as "the best job in the world" but; its obviously known many would fit in rather than just this particular one. No, you did not make any claim of it being completely automated but rather heavily automated which still means majority of airplane control is automated which in reality is barely not crossing the 50% line.



    I'm sorry. Couldn't get you there. Elaborate a bit if you dont mind
    If you're in referral to classic flight control where the days DC aircraft and pre fly-by-wire then yeah, could say so.



    Both. I've started my flying and I find it thoroughly exciting at the same time it isn't boring at all. Thrilling at your first, but never fades away. However there's still time for dreams to turn reality or like terms get more of an inner experience to the industry and profession. From folks I know who've caved in for years, there are good tales' of experience. I used to excessively imagine in my kiddy days but I will also agree there are a bit of downsides, but +more of the upsides weighed.



    You're basically talking the same thing. Financial controllers, doctors in operating theatres.. they're all in an enclosed room/cabin working on a project/procedure for hours aren't they? Sometimes you have a view, other times not

    Same journeys? I don't get it. Its like saying you can go around the earth and explore each and every place during that roughly, say what? 40 year average work span? You're getting paid to travel here. Over that, many airlines have varied destinations and some over 160 routes to choose from or bid, in better words to put it. So, for a person who loves to travel. I don't see how that can't be entertaining. Its not just the clouds out there dear, you get to see a hell lot more haha.



    Specially in the U.S maybe, just maybe you end up working for a crappy domestic regional airline with low pay, then I cant speak for it. Must be the same thing over again, horrible layovers at hotels etc,. I'm talking about major airlines here. International. Put it better - sitting in a small cabin with the worlds view, up at 38.000ft whilst having sushi and double chocolate fudge cake cruising at 680mph.




    It doesn't - to you, and a few. But to many it sure can be mentally stimulating. See... half of the time away from home, variety and all does cover up if you're working for a major, but to get there you need to get thru regional/domestic... bit of sacrifices to be made but I can tell it'll end up being very rewarding in the end no doubt. Fun as a career for those that love the skies, have the passion to fly.

    Again, its your opinion. Won't be the same of mine, or the others. But many do agree its a really cool job and one of the best jobs in the world. I do respect your views and opinions and like you said, fishing can be fun for many when its dull just to you.
    Mmkay, well I won't go in circles with you here because we obviously just see it differently. Good luck with it.
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    (Original post by EnolaGay)
    I'm not a commercial pilot yet but i can answer.

    1. When working with a major airline, yes you would miss home but there are fun things to do outside at your layover with the rest of the crew. The more you do long haul (out of home) you'll be given days off the month to balance the time with family.

    2. Considering a career in aviation is.. I'll admit a risky one. Because of job security. Myself, the Uni way. Yes it is expensive.

    3. I'm a student pilot. There's still years to go. A First Officer gets paid the six digits for a major airline and the Captain, more than him but of course it depends on who you're working for; which region and aircraft you fly.

    4. It can start from you "paying" to fly and earning very little to as much as 250,000-300,000$ and the pay increases with seniority. The more experienced the guys are, better the pay. Medium salary can be about 100,000-180,000$.*

    *commercial airline pilot flying international routes.




    okay cheers, I guess it sounds really utter eating to be apart of, how much did the university cost altogether


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    (Original post by M1011)
    Mmkay, well I won't go in circles with you here because we obviously just see it differently. Good luck with it.
    Cheers.

    (Original post by Tommy1499)
    okay cheers, I guess it sounds really utter eating to be apart of, how much did the university cost altogether


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    nearly 400,000$
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    (Original post by EnolaGay)
    Cheers.



    nearly 400,000$
    what the hell! I'm guessing it might be cheaper to study in the UK but how long will it take you to pay that all back


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    (Original post by Stark95)
    You are having me worried haha
    I thought that was only the first years?
    It's getting harder and harder to progress upward in banks.

    I spoke at length to a guy at Goldman about this, and he's been waiting for promotion to VP for years. Apparently the base of the pyramid has become much wider in recent years as banks have added further intermediate layers between analyst and management. This guy in particular has a PhD in physics and gave up a job as a scientist at a particle accelerator to work for the bank, and he's become disillusioned with his lack of progress.
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    I think being an engineer for a defense contractor would be pretty cool, but that's just me.
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    Motor sports driver.

    What a sick job that is. Racing hard and fast for a living must be immense.
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    Translator/Interpreter
    Sports/News reporter
    Pilot
    TV ghost hunter

    I think those would be my top.
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    (Original post by EnolaGay)
    I'm not a commercial pilot yet but i can answer.

    1. When working with a major airline, yes you would miss home but there are fun things to do outside at your layover with the rest of the crew. The more you do long haul (out of home) you'll be given days off the month to balance the time with family.

    2. Considering a career in aviation is.. I'll admit a risky one. Because of job security. Myself, the Uni way. Yes it is expensive.

    3. I'm a student pilot. There's still years to go. A First Officer gets paid the six digits for a major airline and the Captain, more than him but of course it depends on who you're working for; which region and aircraft you fly.

    4. It can start from you "paying" to fly and earning very little to as much as 250,000-300,000$ and the pay increases with seniority. The more experienced the guys are, better the pay. Medium salary can be about 100,000-180,000$.*

    *commercial airline pilot flying international routes.
    1. it is tougher than you think from what I've read/heard.

    2. Cheapest flying school I could find that had decent (less than 15 yr old) aircraft cost a total of about USD 50k for a commercial license including night, instrument etc ratings (multi engine not included), and that was not in uk, it was in north america. UK is way more expensive as you would know.

    3. No, a fresh commercial license holder doesn't make that kind of money according to current data. He needs to get multi engine rating, then type rating for the aircraft which is hard to get unless you're willing to spend a LOT of money. And being captain requires an ATPL which needs more than 1500hrs. And the competition is tough. If an airline is readily getting applications from ATPLs with several thousands of hrs in the aircraft the airline flies, a fresh guy stands no chance.

    4. And that is basically it. The highest a pilot could ever make is perhaps a few hundred thousand dollars a year. After that you retire. It's a stuck up job. You never get the opportunity to make millions and billions. And what ever you make, you cannot actively invest anywhere either (tough hours).

    The best in this industry is to get into a charter airline or fly for a private owner (wealthy people with their own jets). That's when you get to fly into new exotic places every now and then with slightly better salary and opportunity to meet interesting people or atleast just look at them.
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    (Original post by TurboCretin)
    It's getting harder and harder to progress upward in banks.

    I spoke at length to a guy at Goldman about this, and he's been waiting for promotion to VP for years. Apparently the base of the pyramid has become much wider in recent years as banks have added further intermediate layers between analyst and management. This guy in particular has a PhD in physics and gave up a job as a scientist at a particle accelerator to work for the bank, and he's become disillusioned with his lack of progress.
    Can it be also for a lack of MBA?
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    (Original post by Stark95)
    Can it be also for a lack of MBA?
    PhDs are superior to MBAs though..

    An MBA is just an excuse to mingle with other like minded people for 1 -2 years, the actually content is irrelevant.

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    (Original post by Ilovefantasy)
    The childhood dream... Toy Tester


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    This.
    It would be heaven.

    Or working in M+M world in london.
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    (Original post by Stark95)
    Can it be also for a lack of MBA?
    I don't know much about what banks take into account when promoting people, but this guy was a quant. On the face of it I don't think an MBA would have added much to his CV, especially given that his personal USP was his skill with numbers (and general intelligence, which was frankly pretty frightening).
 
 
 
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