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17-18 is too yong to make a degree decision! Watch

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    (Original post by Michael_Real)
    Totally agree! I'm 16 ad I have to know what Degree I want to do so that I can pick the right A levels, if not then I'm apparently "screwed". It's ridiculous.


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    I remember the emphasis placed on picking the 'right' a levels when you had no idea what you wanted to do. When I got my gcses I ended up changing most of my a level decisions.

    The best thing you can do is to pick facilitating subjects and ones that play to your abilities.

    It's ridiculous how as soon as you get to college, about a month after gcse results, they expect you to know what you want to do at uni. I think most of the problem is that people who do a levels are automatically pushed towards uni (at my college, most of the advice they give us is 'go to oxbridge' Read: get into oxbridge so it makes us look good compared to all the private/grammar schools) - but there are other options out there, apprenticeships, gap years etc that aren't as widely advertised.
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    (Original post by morgan8002)
    If you're seriously committed to your field, you wouldn't wait 22-42 years without proper study in that field.

    Some people don't realise what they want to study for years, doesn't mean that when they find that passion they aren't committed to it.
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    (Original post by hamix.forllz)
    don't agree, OP. i think once you're that age, you're thinking what you want out of life...
    I come from the Medway Towns. I just wanted to leave home.

    Plus it's all on predicted grades so the entire thing is just a gamble anyway!
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    (Original post by superwolf)
    Course not, but if OP's whole point is that 17/18 year olds aren't old enough to be making these major decisions, isn't it even more likely that they'll just go with the flow and end up studying a course they're only half bothered about?
    Bit of a generalisation. There are many 17/18 year olds who don't have a clue what they want to do, but there are also loads who have a general idea what they want to do or a specific career path they want to follow. They shouldn't be punished because of the former group.
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    (Original post by stickylikehoney)
    How would a 17 year old know what they want to do with their life?
    When I was doing my UCAS; I was listening to my Indie CD, having fights with my mum and going to nightclubs each weekend. Not worrying about my future!

    I didn't even read my course properly!
    I decided what I wanted to do when I was in year 8, it is possible, my brothers didn't know what they wanted to do so they worked for a couple of years and then went to uni. Everybody is different
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    (Original post by stickylikehoney)
    I come from the Medway Towns. I just wanted to leave home.

    Plus it's all on predicted grades so the entire thing is just a gamble anyway!
    but many do.....I don't agree with your generalisation.
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    (Original post by InadequateJusticex)
    Bit of a generalisation. There are many 17/18 year olds who don't have a clue what they want to do, but there are also loads who have a general idea what they want to do or a specific career path they want to follow. They shouldn't be punished because of the former group.
    I don't think anyone's planning on banning the under-20s from uni! The way I've interpreted things is that we could do with a more open attitude towards going to uni, encouraging people of all ages to apply if and when they feel ready.
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    (Original post by superwolf)
    I don't think anyone's planning on banning the under-20s from uni! The way I've interpreted things is that we could do with a more open attitude towards going to uni, encouraging people of all ages to apply if and when they feel ready.
    I interpreted the first post as a sort of 'we should increase the minimum age at which you can apply to uni' and typed my reponses accordingly But yeah, I don't think this open attitude is tackled much in schools. In fact I'm pretty sure teachers encourage you to go to university...
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    (Original post by stickylikehoney)
    I come from the Medway Towns. I just wanted to leave home.

    Plus it's all on predicted grades so the entire thing is just a gamble anyway!
    Why not just move out rather than go to university then?

    The idea is that good students get good AS results and good predicted grades. The final decision is based on A-level and other (eg. STEP) grades anyway, so people should go to where they are suited.
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    (Original post by stickylikehoney)
    How would a 17 year old know what they want to do with their life?
    When I was doing my UCAS; I was listening to my Indie CD, having fights with my mum and going to nightclubs each weekend. Not worrying about my future!

    I didn't even read my course properly!

    50% of young people now go to university.

    They pay many thousands of pounds in fees to be taught lectures that anyone can see on You Tube, read books that anyone can buy from Waterstones and join clubs that anyone can join and then not attend in their local community.

    Unless someone is a scientific whizz kid, they are not going to be regarded as being particularly special , say, in philosophy, no matter how fresh their style of discourse and experiences are.

    It is now a capitalist scheme meets social club to keep teachers in work, to give a veneer of importance to a majority and to set people on a course in life that has nothing to do with their raw intellect.

    An arts degree in itself is the equivalent of having a sign around your neck saying 'I consistently said or wrote the exact things designed to keep cleverish man or woman happy. No new insight was necessary on my or their part. I do not necessarily sincerely hold any of these things in my character.'

    I get more meaning from playing videogames and considering their themes than any English degree would give me.
    I understand Oxford's reluctance to make English a degree in the early 20th century.

    Invariably, the best thing about a university is its architecture. So maybe more of us should aim to be architects. Our ideas are not worth having in the internet age.
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    I'm 24 by the way.

    So I applied in 2009. This is ages ago. So it's just mature me wanting to slap my teenage self round the head for being a... er... teenager.

    Do you think I made the right decision by finishing my degree? Are there prospects without a degree?

    None of my friends who dropped out or didn't go are doing well...
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    Perhaps not too YOUNG to actually make a decision, but the problem is rather many people at that age don't know of all the opportunities that exist.

    By opportunities I mean all the different careers available, and what they entail. Many grammar schools nowadays are holding very proactive careers fairs and events, but most miss out on useful and enlightening stuff like this.
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    I agree.
    I'm kinda struggling at the moment cause i have no idea what the hell i want.
    My degree decision is probably going to affect my whole future and i am too young for this ****.
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    Probably but if you think it is to young for you at that age then there isn't actuallt anything stopping you from waiting.

    Now of course there is pressure to go straight to university at 18 for fear of being left behind. But it's a genuine option, it isn't one I took, but its genuinely something people can and should do if they arent too sure about what degree they want to do (if any)
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    (Original post by Sir Fox)
    Think about it, with GCSEs and A-level choices already narrowing your choice of degree the point at which a lot of students have to make their first important decisions is around 15 or 16 years of age. Choose the wrong AS-levels and you can all but forget getting into med school.

    I only had a clue about I want to do when I was 20. Thankfully, with the average German secondary school leaver being around 19 years old (at the time) and me having done a gap year it wasn't too late.
    Really?
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    I would say so, but speaking as a 17 year old, I don't see why you can't start to learn everything you THINK you want to learn now and then decide progressively.


    For example, I know I want to do something to do with science so I picked Bio/Chem/Phys/Maths and right now, I'm reading outside of the curriculum and in some cases looking into undergrad level stuff.

    This has given me some indication of what I DON'T want to do at university level (Physics ):unimpressed: and hopefully, over time, I will be able to cut down to one subject.

    Well that's my theory anyway.
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    Sometimes parents will pressure you togo study right after high school. Like most black parents. They push teens to university to study "whatever" before the kid get hooked on drugs while taking gap years
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    (Original post by Xin Xang)
    I would say so, but speaking as a 17 year old, I don't see why you can't start to learn everything you THINK you want to learn now and then decide progressively.


    For example, I know I want to do something to do with science so I picked Bio/Chem/Phys/Maths and right now, I'm reading outside of the curriculum and in some cases looking into undergrad level stuff.

    This has given me some indication of what I DON'T want to do at university level (Physics ):unimpressed: and hopefully, over time, I will be able to cut down to one subject.

    Well that's my theory anyway.
    Exactly, any sensible person would do this. Over time, I have cut out everything except for maths and theoretical physics.
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    (Original post by Xin Xang)
    I would say so, but speaking as a 17 year old, I don't see why you can't start to learn everything you THINK you want to learn now and then decide progressively.


    For example, I know I want to do something to do with science so I picked Bio/Chem/Phys/Maths and right now, I'm reading outside of the curriculum and in some cases looking into undergrad level stuff.

    This has given me some indication of what I DON'T want to do at university level (Physics ):unimpressed: and hopefully, over time, I will be able to cut down to one subject.

    Well that's my theory anyway.
    Sounds like a good plan. :yy:

    I think my main problem with the current system/expectations, is that most people will only get one shot at a degree, and if they change their minds about what career they want later in life it can be hard to find the means to reenter into education. I'm lucky as my second degree of choice is NHS-funded, but not everyone will get that second chance.
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    (Original post by superwolf)
    Sounds like a good plan. :yy:

    I think my main problem with the current system/expectations, is that most people will only get one shot at a degree, and if they change their minds about what career they want later in life it can be hard to find the means to reenter into education. I'm lucky as my second degree of choice is NHS-funded, but not everyone will get that second chance.
    Perhaps one solution would be to make exams more difficult, in the sense that more background reading and intuition would be necessary to do well, increasing the likelihood one would have of finding their "niche subject" earlier on.

    I personally think A Levels should be only for those who WANT to learn.

    Not to sound like a snob, but I am honestly surprised when I see classmates mucking around throughout lessons.

    I mean why are they even there?
 
 
 
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