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    (Original post by L'Evil Fish)
    So how do I use the definite article with the adjectives? Cos it's like a double thing isn't it

    When do I use de/den/det?
    When an adjective is followed by a noun in the definite form you use a definitive article (det/den/de). For example:

    "det svenska folket" - "the Swedish people"

    ‘Den’, ‘det’, and ‘de’ can also be used as synonyms to ‘den där/det där/de där’

    "Jag vill ha den (där) bilen" - "I want (to) have that car".

    Definitive articles are also used for saying 'this' (which you might already know?)

    e.g. Den här bilen -- this car

    You could also say 'denna bil' to say 'this car', though to me 'den här' sounds better.
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    (Original post by I. Dzhugashvili)
    Nei, ikkje akkurat. Eg flytta til Noreg og brukar oftast nynorsk. Men i Skandinavia er alle dei skrivne språka veldig nær til kvarandre. Problemet kjém med dei mange dialektar i kvart land. For eksempel er det lettare for meg å forstå "rikssvensk" enn dei fleiste dialektane i Noreg.

    Nej, inte precis. Jag flyttade till Norge och använder oftast nynorsk. Men i Skandinavien är alla dessa språken mycket nära till varandra. Problemet ligger med de många dialekterna i varje land. Till exempel är det lättare för mig att förstå "rikssvenska" än de flesta dialekterna i Norge.

    Lycka till!
    vet du også bokmål? Hvorfor bruker du nynorsk?
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    (Original post by TheTechN1304)
    When an adjective is followed by a noun in the definite form you use a definitive article (det/den/de). For example:

    "det svenska folket" - "the Swedish people"

    ‘Den’, ‘det’, and ‘de’ can also be used as synonyms to ‘den där/det där/de där’

    "Jag vill ha den (där) bilen" - "I want (to) have that car".

    Definitive articles are also used for saying 'this' (which you might already know?)

    e.g. Den här bilen -- this car

    You could also say 'denna bil' to say 'this car', though to me 'den här' sounds better.
    So det for ett, den for en, and de for plural?

    What does där mean on its own? If anything

    So what's 'that'

    Like 'that car'
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    (Original post by L'Evil Fish)
    Ingen vill lära svenska

    Varför?!
    I haven't been learning since the summer but I think I can translate this:

    No one want's to learn Swedish

    why?! (Did you mean variför, l'evil fish?)

    Rubbish, it's my second favourite language. Has anyone used the teach yourself complete Swedish with any success, I found it very useful while I was learning?
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    (Original post by L'Evil Fish)
    So det for ett, den for en, and de for plural?

    What does där mean on its own? If anything

    So what's 'that'

    Like 'that car'
    I think 'den' means an abstract word for the, as in I want the car, while där means that. Correct me if I'm wrong l'evil fish
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    (Original post by Gott)
    I haven't been learning since the summer but I think I can translate this:

    No one want's to learn Swedish

    Rubbish, it's my second favourite language. Has anyone used the teach yourself complete Swedish with any success, I found it very useful while I was learning?
    (Original post by Gott)
    I think 'den' means an abstract word for the, as in I want the car, while där means that. Correct me if I'm wrong l'evil fish
    I wouldn't be able to correct unfortunately :lol:

    What's your first favourite language?
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    (Original post by L'Evil Fish)
    I wouldn't be able to correct unfortunately :lol:

    What's your first favourite language?
    Deutsch vor Schwedish, dann kommt Englisch
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    (Original post by Gott)
    Deutsch vor Schwedish, dann kommt Englisch
    Ah my German is ****

    Ich kann kein Deutsch sprechen
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    (Original post by L'Evil Fish)
    Ah my German is ****

    Ich kann kein Deutsch sprechen
    Du Heißt das unheiles Fisch. Kannst du es überzetzungen?
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    (Original post by Gott)
    Du Heißt das unheiles Fisch. Kannst du es überzetzungen?
    Can I explain it?
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    (Original post by L'Evil Fish)
    Can I explain it?
    Can you translate?
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    Btw OP are you trying to fit Swedish learning in with A levels because that's just not going to happen with me
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    (Original post by Gott)
    Can you translate?
    Just evil fish
    (Original post by Gott)
    Btw OP are you trying to fit Swedish learning in with A levels because that's just not going to happen with me
    Well, yeah, it doesn't really hinder anything because my a Levels are a doss.

    Trying to get my Spanish and italian up to scratch, and J get basics up in Swedish.
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    (Original post by L'Evil Fish)
    Just evil fish


    Well, yeah, it doesn't really hinder anything because my a Levels are a doss.

    Trying to get my Spanish and italian up to scratch, and J get basics up in Swedish.
    Aren't you doing A level maths and Chemistry, THE most difficult subjects or are you just a genius at them?
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    (Original post by L'Evil Fish)
    What does där mean on its own? If anything
    So what's 'that'
    Like 'that car'
    (Original post by Gott)
    I think 'den' means an abstract word for the, as in I want the car, while där means that. Correct me if I'm wrong l'evil fish
    I think of där as translating to there.

    So: Den här boken --> This here book
    And: Den där boken --> That there book

    But yeah, I'm trying to learn Swedish, and the main thing I've noticed is how many of the words (often determiners and prepositions) don't overlap with their English counterparts all that much. It would be nice to get to a level where you I don't need to find the equivalent English word all the time.
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    (Original post by Gott)
    Aren't you doing A level maths and Chemistry, THE most difficult subjects or are you just a genius at them?
    Further Maths, Physics, Chemistry and French.

    Meh i disagree, they may be the least accessible, but not hardest

    (Original post by Tpx)
    I think of där as translating to there.

    So: Den här bok --> This here book
    And: Den där bok --> That there book

    But yeah, I'm trying to learn Swedish, and the main thing I've noticed is how many of the words (like determiners and prepositions) don't overlap with their English counterparts all that much. It would be nice to get to a level where you I don't need to find the equivalent English word all the time.
    Aah I like that! It's quite logical

    What's your background? Like age, languages etc
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    Hej! Jag är halv Svensk men jag har inte bott där för sju år så jag blir värre varje år.
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    (Original post by Fallen21)
    Hej! Jag är halv Svensk men jag har inte bott där för sju år så jag blir värre varje år.
    Aah, well when I eventually learn more words and stuff, jag kan tala med dig
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    (Original post by L'Evil Fish)
    So det for ett, den for en, and de for plural?

    What does där mean on its own? If anything

    So what's 'that'

    Like 'that car'
    Där means there, här means here

    That car would be den där bilen (which literally means 'the car over there')
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    (Original post by TheTechN1304)
    Där means there, här means here

    That car would be den där bilen (which literally means 'the car over there')
    Den här bilen är min

    This car is mine?
 
 
 
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