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Edexcel Unit 4: Physics on the Move 6PH04 (11th June 2015) watch

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    (Original post by Lolgarithms)
    +1 for 'Practice in Physics'.

    Arguably the best (only?) A-level text that focuses purely on problem solving.

    There's very little theory in there, but there's absolutely tons of decent questions. Different style to A-level exam questions, but plenty there to practice with.

    There's another one, called 'Calculations for A-level Physics' which is (apparently) a decent book (Amazon reviews are good, I have no real experience with this book) - but may not be the best bet for the Edexcel exams, which look to be more 'wordy' than other exam boards.
    I've actually started revising for exams so are you alright with answering a few questions I might have?
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    Took this exam in Jan (IAL) and would be willing to help out if anybody needs assistance!
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    (Original post by Navo D.)
    Took this exam in Jan (IAL) and would be willing to help out if anybody needs assistance!
    Could you explain the whole binding energy/mass deficit bit of the E=mc^2 equation?
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    (Original post by sj97)
    Could you explain the whole binding energy/mass deficit bit of the E=mc^2 equation?
    Okay so binding energy is the energy required to spilt a nucleus into its constituent nucleons (protons and neutrons). It's this energy that causes a disparity between the expected mass of a nucleus, based on the sum of masses of its protons and neutrons, and the observed value. It is seen that the observed mass is less than the expected mass.

    Where does this mass disappear? This missing mass, known as the mass defect contributes to the binding energy of the nucleus. The E=mc^2 relationship shows that this mass can indeed provide energy to keep the protons and neutrons close to each other, by releasing energy when the nucleus is formed.

    To calculate nuclear binding energy, first find the mass defect by finding the difference between expected and observed nuclear mass, then use the E=mc^2 equation (keeping mass in kg) to find the binding energy per nucleus. This can be changed to per nucleon by dividing by the no. of nucleons. Nuclear binding energy has important applications, eg determining whether fission or fusion will occur.
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    Hi guys - would this be a good definition of apparent weightlessness? An object is accelerating downward at 9.81 ms^-2, and there is no reactionary force i.e. they are free fall?

    Its just for me to understand the concept behind it

    Thanks for any help
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    (Original post by ThatWasHard!)
    Hi guys - would this be a good definition of apparent weightlessness? An object is accelerating downward at 9.81 ms^-2, and there is no reactionary force i.e. they are free fall?

    Its just for me to understand the concept behind it

    Thanks for any help
    Yeah it basically means there's no reaction force on the body

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    Finished the unit 6(A2) practical assessment for Edexcel physics, willingly to exchange for Biology AQA EMPA, DM me for more information
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    (Original post by Navo D.)
    x
    Hi, I don't suppose you (or anyone else who sees this) help me answer this question from a 2008 paper please?

    On one type of theme park ride, a boat swings freely along a circular path from successively higher starting positions. As the boat moves through the lowest point on its swing, the riders are travelling at high speeds, and feel quite big forces on them.
    With some rides, such as Rush at Thorpe Park, the highest starting point is with the supporting arm horizontal as shown.
    a) The length of the supporting arm of Rush is 18 m. The mass of a typical rider is 70 kg. Work out the g force (which is equal to) force from seat/ weight of rider.
    I've found the g force to be equal to 3 which turns out to be correct.

    (b) Two students in the queue are having a discussion.
    A says: “If they made a new ride twice as big the g-force at the bottom would be amazing"
    B says: “I think the g-force wouldn’t be any different.”
    With reference to your calculation, explain which student is correct.

    Initially, I thought that A would be correct since in part a, I found that Reaction force=centripetal force+weight of rider where the centripetal force=mv^2/r. Hence, if the ride is bigger, then the rider would have more kinetic energy, so a greater velocity so the value for the reaction force would increase, resulting in a bigger g force. This turns out to be the wrong answer though as the mark scheme says:
    height not a factor, so B is correct. Why am I wrong?
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    Can someone explain 5ai please? And why is the value for l=0.12m for part b) instead of l=0.48m?
    http://papers.xtremepapers.com/Edexc...8%20Unit-5.pdf
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    (Original post by BP_Tranquility)
    Can someone explain 5ai please? And why is the value for l=0.12m for part b) instead of l=0.48m?
    http://papers.xtremepapers.com/Edexc...8%20Unit-5.pdf
    I think -

    Position 1: By using Flemming's left hand rule the electrons are moving downwards around clockwise so current must be in the opposite direction - anticlockwise.
    Position 2: No change in flux linkage so current is 0.
    Position 3: Similar to 1 except electrons move upwards so current is downwards clockwise.

    For part b) the equation used is Emf=Blv and the length of one side is 0.12m as stated in the question.

    Hope this helps!
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    (Original post by iceangel8)
    I think -

    Position 1: By using Flemming's left hand rule the electrons are moving downwards around clockwise so current must be in the opposite direction - anticlockwise.
    Position 2: No change in flux linkage so current is 0.
    Position 3: Similar to 1 except electrons move upwards so current is downwards clockwise.

    For part b) the equation used is Emf=Blv and the length of one side is 0.12m as stated in the question.

    Hope this helps!
    For part a), you said you used Fleming left hand rule: so the field is into the paper and the motion is to the right for all 3 diagrams so surely, the current is downwards for all 3?
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    Ooh got my Unit 4 mock tmmrw. Should be a blast haha I love unit 4.


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    Hi, how would you answer this question?
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    (Original post by yasminh118)
    Hi, how would you answer this question?
    Then the collision would be elastic which it is not.


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    The mark scheme says:

    Mass of incoming proton larger (than rest mass)
    Due to moving near speed of light/high speed/high energy/relativistic

    Alt answer : image not in plane of two protons after the event

    I dont understand how they're implying the collision is inelastic?






    (Original post by physicsmaths)
    Then the collision would be elastic which it is not.


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    Hey. I'm having to self teach myself A2 Physics as my school does not offer it. So I am doing the experiment next week with a private centre. How does it work the Unit 6 practical? How can I prepare for it? I just don't know the structure and best way to prepare as I have offers depending on this. Thanks.
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    If any of you use the 'Practice in Physics 4th edition' textbook by T. Akrill, could you possibly let me know if chapter 20.2 - magnetic field patterns are relevant to this edexcel course?

    stuff such as describing the how mag flux density varies across the axis of a solenoid or using equations such as B = μ0*I/2*pi*r
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    (Original post by ThatWasHard!)
    If any of you use the 'Practice in Physics 4th edition' textbook by T. Akrill, could you possibly let me know if chapter 20.2 - magnetic field patterns are relevant to this edexcel course?

    stuff such as describing the how mag flux density varies across the axis of a solenoid or using equations such as B = μ0*I/2*pi*r
    I dont think you need to know that. Although they could give you those equations in an exam and tell you to use them in a question!


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    (Original post by physicsmaths)
    I dont think you need to know that. Although they could give you those equations in an exam and tell you to use them in a question!


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    Actually, they could! they have the constant μ0 (permitivity of free space) given in the data sheets
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    (Original post by ThatWasHard!)
    Actually, they could! they have the constant μ0 (permitivity of free space) given in the data sheets
    But that is for something else not the solenoid thing. I have 3 physics textbooks and none have that formula(edexcel textbooks).


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