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Is this greed or simply reasonable? - Salary negotiation watch

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    (Original post by kka25)
    This is very risky. Someone just left the company and the manager didn't even bother offering more (and he would have stayed if more money were given)
    I guess it depends though. A family member did this, and they ended up getting £3 more an hour, they basically matched the salary said person was going to get in the new role.

    Maybe since you just got a pay increase that's where the problem lies.

    (Original post by Reue)
    Pay negotiations are always tricky. I've only ever gone into them when I already had another job offer or was prepared to leave anyway. The first time they matched my other offer.. and the 2nd time I left after a couple of months. There's no point going into the negotiation if you're not going to do anything if/when they say no.
    Exact same thing happened in my example up above.
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    Better: actually get a better job offer. If you're really being paid 70% below market it shouldn't be hard; if not, maybe you've misread the situation.
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    Section Leader
    In answer to your main question, it's not greed, no - I think it's a wish to be treated fairly. If you believe you are as valuable to the company as your colleagues, then I think it's natural to want to be paid the same as them.

    As for what you should do about it, I think others have given a good answer to that. Have a 1-on-1 with your manager and express that you would like your salary to increase in-line with the increase in your value to the company, and suggest a figure that is more in keeping with what your colleagues are earning. If you really are worth the same to them as those colleagues, they will likely accept.
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    (Original post by kka25)
    This is a good suggestion; the only problem that I may face is that the manager will argue that I've already received a pay increased prior so there's no need to increase my salary.
    Then take up a new job.

    If you say you're looking for stuff on linkedin and you haven't got the job, you can easily find yourself out of the job, the guy could just find another person desperate for work and pay him lower.
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    I agree completely with Reue on the strategy. Emphasise your own contribution and value rather than others'.

    Having said that, I really ****ing hate sycophancy.
    • Thread Starter
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    Wanted to go to the manager today but he was busy with loads of things in the office. Somehow, the most inner part of me told me that I should just be happy and get on with it; getting a job is hard enough and being happy in one is a bonus. Also, I do feel slightly sorry for him since the company didn't do quite well last year (laughing at myself for being such a fool for even considering this) or maybe I'm just too nervous to bring it up.

    I don't know. Maybe I'm just naive and oblivious towards my own abilities Any advice is sincerely appreciated.
 
 
 
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