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    (Original post by sk123456789)
    Starting Medicine this September and was wondering if any current students could tell me what books/study materials they're using for each subject just so that I can familiarise myself with the course etc.
    University is quite different to School every uni will prefer different books and the books are often extremely expensive. I only own 3 text books but you csn order others off the BMA once you start and are registered. It's not worth buying most.
    It'll also greatly depend on your course as to which order you need books.
    There's absolutely no need to study over summer, you'd be far far better to just take a break. Knowing A level biology well is plenty grounding for first year anyway.
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    I will chime in to say that whilst the book of Gray's Anatomy for Students hasn't been very useful, I have found the online subscription it comes with to be useful indeed. In both surface anatomy classes and dissection, having Gray's on hand was a very good way of making sense of what we were actually doing - because it is all explained. But I appreciate that this only worked well because the sessions were structured in a way that we could read Gray's on iPads etc. - so your experiences will inevitably differ.

    Overall, you shouldn't buy any textbooks for medical school before you arrive. There's no point. Your lectures may be fantastic, or they may not be. The lecture notes faculty provides might be fantastic, or they might not. The notes you get from your peers may be fantastic, or they might not. You just won't know.

    But my advice is that once you arrive - don't be afraid to explore the books in the libraries. If you think they're useful, then buy them. Ultimately, it's your learning and if you see something you think could help with that, then it makes sense to buy one.
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    (Original post by Tronick)
    For eager, unbled incoming medical students like us the whole "don't waste your money" "wait til you get here" thing is quite depressing to read. We want to buy textbooks and look at our vast piles of them and feel like we've qualified already. That's the underlying feeling behind this very common question.
    ah the joys of being at stage 1 of the 4 stage model of skill acquisition ... where you don;t know what you don;t know ...

    Helenia is correct, and the same advice is given to the vast majority of student HCPs with the possible exception of finding out what is the favoured A+P text or if you can get a copy of a classic such as Grey's cheap ...


    ( the only exception is for paramedic students where the AACE/ JRCALC guidelines is universal and the anglicsied version of Nancy Caroline are pretty ubiquituous . )
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    (Original post by annawells123)
    hahaha guilty as charged!!! im not claiming these will be essential but these are pretty decent prices and if you are a bit anxious like me and want to buy the stuff on the reading list then what a great opportunity
    PM'd you
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    (Original post by Tronick)
    For eager, unbled incoming medical students like us the whole "don't waste your money" "wait til you get here" thing is quite depressing to read. We want to buy textbooks and look at our vast piles of them and feel like we've qualified already. That's the underlying feeling behind this very common question.
    Well get over it. You've got a hell of a long way to go before coming close to qualifying, and a little bit of humility does us all good. You're going into a profession wherein how accomplished you wish to feel is the single lowest priority; to be complaining that those who came before you aren't giving you sufficient help with massaging your ego isn't a good way to start. Rid yourself of that underlying feeling as quickly and comprehensively as you can.

    TSR has (or had, a few years ago when I was writing it) an entire wiki page dedicated to reviews of medical textbooks, and your medical school will have a library full of them to sample before you buy, or to absolve you of the need to buy some of them at all. Your lecturers will recommend some, you and your colleagues will find and share a few good ones. It's a very common question and the very common answer is the only correct one: don't buy a load of textbooks before going to medical school, it's an unproductive waste of money and serves little purpose other than to make you feel special. That was the advice I was given, that was the advice my teachers were given, that's the advice I give today because, as it turns out, it's entirely correct.
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    (Original post by Friar Chris)
    Well get over it. You've got a hell of a long way to go before coming close to qualifying, and a little bit of humility does us all good. You're going into a profession wherein how accomplished you wish to feel is the single lowest priority; to be complaining that those who came before you aren't giving you sufficient help with massaging your ego isn't a good way to start. Rid yourself of that underlying feeling as quickly and comprehensively as you can.

    TSR has (or had, a few years ago when I was writing it) an entire wiki page dedicated to reviews of medical textbooks, and your medical school will have a library full of them to sample before you buy, or to absolve you of the need to buy some of them at all. Your lecturers will recommend some, you and your colleagues will find and share a few good ones. It's a very common question and the very common answer is the only correct one: don't buy a load of textbooks before going to medical school, it's an unproductive waste of money and serves little purpose other than to make you feel special. That was the advice I was given, that was the advice my teachers were given, that's the advice I give today because, as it turns out, it's entirely correct.
    Blimey, I hope I never meet you on the wards.

    Either you misunderstood my sentiment or you're looking for an argument.
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    (Original post by Tronick)
    Blimey, I hope I never meet you on the wards.

    Either you misunderstood my sentiment or you're looking for an argument.
    Well, it is kind of frustrating when someone asks for help, they get (honest, practical) answers from people who've been there, and then someone complains about the advice that's given. Oh, and decides to explain the reasoning behind the question as though we've not all been there ourselves. We're not trying to be mean!

    However, I think what might've particularly irked Chris was the bit about "We want to buy textbooks and look at our vast piles of them and feel like we've qualified already"; it may (accurately or otherwise) have put him in mind of a particular breed of medical student who we've all met, and who basically lacks the self-awareness to realise how little they actually know (hence the humility comment). Not saying this is you, but your post did come across a tad like that.

    tl;dr - people were only trying to be helpful, and humility is a likeable characteristic.
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    (Original post by *pitseleh*)
    Well, it is kind of frustrating when someone asks for help, they get (honest, practical) answers from people who've been there, and then someone complains about the advice that's given. Oh, and decides to explain the reasoning behind the question as though we've not all been there ourselves. We're not trying to be mean!

    However, I think what might've particularly irked Chris was the bit about "We want to buy textbooks and look at our vast piles of them and feel like we've qualified already"; it may (accurately or otherwise) have put him in mind of a particular breed of medical student who we've all met, and who basically lacks the self-awareness to realise how little they actually know (hence the humility comment). Not saying this is you, but your post did come across a tad like that.

    tl;dr - people were only trying to be helpful, and humility is a likeable characteristic.
    Fair enough, I'm sorry for any offence caused. The line you quoted was meant to come across as tongue in cheek, reinforced by the use of "unbled" in the first line.
    What I should have posted is that many incoming medical students (like me hopefully) are so excited that we just want to go out and buy every textbook we can find, which makes it hard to take the sensible advice of those who've already been through it. That, however, did not sound very cool
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    (Original post by Tronick)
    Fair enough, I'm sorry for any offence caused. The line you quoted was meant to come across as tongue in cheek, reinforced by the use of "unbled" in the first line.
    What I should have posted is that many incoming medical students (like me hopefully) are so excited that we just want to go out and buy every textbook we can find, which makes it hard to take the sensible advice of those who've already been through it. That, however, did not sound very cool
    It's alright; I guess certain phrases and (apparent) attitudes can just get our hackles up a bit sometimes, though sorry about that if you were just being tongue-in-cheek! And we know you're keen! It is frustrating, but it will roll around extremely quickly and you will do a lot better for having properly rested.. I can almost guarantee that there will be at least one occasion (for me, it was pretty much a daily occurrence!) where you wish you could trade a day of lectures for a care-free day in the sun. So yeah.. that's why I say enjoy it while you can!
 
 
 
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