Turn on thread page Beta

Borderline Personality Disorder? watch

    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    I really didn't know there was such stigma about BPD?

    Why is that?
    • TSR Support Team
    • Peer Support Volunteers
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    Peer Support Volunteers
    (Original post by Twinpeaks)
    I really didn't know there was such stigma about BPD?

    Why is that?
    There is stigma around all mental health issues sadly. For PDs you're seen as "odd", not able to control your feelings, actions or emotions. (This is my experiences; I don't have BPD, but another PD.)
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by CescaD96)
    There is stigma around all mental health issues sadly. For PDs you're seen as "odd", not able to control your feelings, actions or emotions. (This is my experiences; I don't have BPD, but another PD.)
    Yeah I know, but I just didn't know that BPD stood out. A lot of diagnoses present anti-social symptoms.

    So strange! It's crazy that you get stigmatisation amongst mental health care professionals. But then I suppose they aren't immune to such things.
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Man.bear.pig)
    Not true. I study criminology and there are plenty of cases where teenage murderers and criminals of other sorts have been diagnosed for disorders as stated in the OP. Don't even know how you could say that.

    That being said, no one can be entirely sure how credible OP is. But your sentence is not accurate.
    Yeah but you aren't exactly looking at a normal representation of the population there!


    And were their diagnoses made before or after their criminal acts?
    • TSR Support Team
    • Peer Support Volunteers
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    Peer Support Volunteers
    (Original post by Twinpeaks)
    Yeah I know, but I just didn't know that BPD stood out. A lot of diagnoses present anti-social symptoms.

    So strange! It's crazy that you get stigmatisation amongst mental health care professionals. But then I suppose they aren't immune to such things.
    BPD stands out because everyone has heard of it. I'm anankastic, I have obsessive compulsive personality disorder, and no one has heard of that nearly. :rolleyes:

    But yeah, stigmatization even exists in the MH profession. My therapist has no idea what to do with me now since my diagnosis. Makes me wonder.
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by CescaD96)
    BPD stands out because everyone has heard of it. I'm anankastic, I have obsessive compulsive personality disorder, and no one has heard of that nearly. :rolleyes:

    But yeah, stigmatization even exists in the MH profession. My therapist has no idea what to do with me now since my diagnosis. Makes me wonder.
    The fact she doesn't have a clue what to do with you is just weird tbh! A lot of psychology is transferable so it's like... Come on? I think she needs to buck up her ideas. I know you think it's your personality but she shouldn't be settling for that because the behaviour clearly won't be healthy for you in the long run. But equally there is evidence of personality disorders getting better with time. It really isn't a case of that's just my personality...
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Twinpeaks)
    Yeah but you aren't exactly looking at a normal representation of the population there!


    And were their diagnoses made before or after their criminal acts?
    It varies. There are cases where the juvenile was always struggling with disorders and so they were slightly pardoned during sentencing. Others were sent to receive rehabilitation and counselling. Others were of course incarcerated if the crime was heinous enough or if the record is extensive enough and despite having PDs they were seen as lost causes and accepted as doomed to commit the crimes that they had committed because of their PDs and illnesses. Upon placement in detention centres youth are typically screened and assessed for mental disorders because it's such a high occurrence that their behavioural issues are linked to mental illness (depression, PTSD, ADHD, etc) exacerbated by substance abuse, often.

    It's quite a normal representation when you consider crime rate of certain areas, and regardless of area at least 50% of youth who commit crimes suffer from an illness found upon evaluation whether the school implored it or protocol upon being sentenced or sent to a reform school.
    • TSR Support Team
    • Peer Support Volunteers
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    Peer Support Volunteers
    (Original post by Little Popcorns)
    The fact she doesn't have a clue what to do with you is just weird tbh! A lot of psychology is transferable so it's like... Come on? I think she needs to buck up her ideas. I know you think it's your personality but she shouldn't be settling for that because the behaviour clearly won't be healthy for you in the long run. But equally there is evidence of personality disorders getting better with time. It really isn't a case of that's just my personality...
    Sucks really. I've been trawling through the internet and all I can get is that the symptoms will not be so intense in my late 30s/40s but no one seems to have a clue? It only affects 2.1%-7.9% of the entire population and long term therapy is the only thing I've been offered.

    Yeah, true, it's my personality. I would only like to learn how to deal with the worse traits of it please, it's all I ask...
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by CescaD96)
    Sucks really. I've been trawling through the internet and all I can get is that the symptoms will not be so intense in my late 30s/40s but no one seems to have a clue? It only affects 2.1%-7.9% of the entire population and long term therapy is the only thing I've been offered.

    Yeah, true, it's my personality. I would only like to learn how to deal with the worse traits of it please, it's all I ask...
    Yeah thing to remember though is that we are all pretty malleable. Things will change just keep challenging yourself, just like you would in every other way e.g. Education. And I'm sure the therapist genius :rolleyes: will come up with something at some point, we'd hope...
    • TSR Support Team
    • Peer Support Volunteers
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    Peer Support Volunteers
    (Original post by Little Popcorns)
    Yeah thing to remember though is that we are all pretty malleable. Things will change just keep challenging yourself, just like you would in every other way e.g. Education. And I'm sure the therapist genius :rolleyes: will come up with something at some point, we'd hope...
    I did challenge myself the other day and nearly had a panic attack on the bus. That's the way forward!
    I mean, she's a lovely person, but I guess their feeling is "oh, she's away to Scotland in September, we can't do any of the serious stuff, let's just work on the self esteem and confidence"
    • #4
    #4

    (Original post by CescaD96)
    I did challenge myself the other day and nearly had a panic attack on the bus. That's the way forward!
    I mean, she's a lovely person, but I guess their feeling is "oh, she's away to Scotland in September, we can't do any of the serious stuff, let's just work on the self esteem and confidence"
    That's basically more or less what my therapist had said to me since I move away for uni in September. Kind of sucks
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by CescaD96)
    I did challenge myself the other day and nearly had a panic attack on the bus. That's the way forward!
    I mean, she's a lovely person, but I guess their feeling is "oh, she's away to Scotland in September, we can't do any of the serious stuff, let's just work on the self esteem and confidence"
    Oh dear :/. Ah well I suppose it's better to have some support in the mean time.
    • TSR Support Team
    • Peer Support Volunteers
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    Peer Support Volunteers
    (Original post by Anonymous)
    That's basically more or less what my therapist had said to me since I move away for uni in September. Kind of sucks
    Yeah, I'm going to uni too. Petrified I'll fall out of the system.

    (Original post by Little Popcorns)
    Oh dear :/. Ah well I suppose it's better to have some support in the mean time.
    Weekly meetings of me ranting? For free? Suits me.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Man.bear.pig)
    Not true. I study criminology and there are plenty of cases where teenage murderers and criminals of other sorts have been diagnosed for disorders as stated in the OP. Don't even know how you could say that.

    That being said, no one can be entirely sure how credible OP is. But your sentence is not accurate.
    What I meant was, it's nuts to diagnose a 17 year old with a personality disorder - not saying anything bad about OP whatsoever, but I'd be pretty suspicious of their psychiatrist.

    Yeah there are always going to be some unusual cases, but as a general rule personality disorders are not to be diagnosed in the under-18s. :nah:
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by superwolf)
    What I meant was, it's nuts to diagnose a 17 year old with a personality disorder - not saying anything bad about OP whatsoever, but I'd be pretty suspicious of their psychiatrist.

    Yeah there are always going to be some unusual cases, but as a general rule personality disorders are not to be diagnosed in the under-18s. :nah:
    That's why as people age they become severe and sometimes fatal, because people are wary of diagnosing children and teens with these disorders, despite pathological evidence of symptoms. Hence not being able to deny it or bull**** about it if the youth is a criminal and now rehabilitation, treatment and therapy are obligatory and implored.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Man.bear.pig)
    That's why as people age they become severe and sometimes fatal, because people are wary of diagnosing children and teens with these disorders, despite pathological evidence of symptoms. Hence not being able to deny it or bull**** about it if the youth is a criminal and now rehabilitation, treatment and therapy are obligatory and implored.
    I suspect that this isn't overly relevant to OP though.

    I agree that young people need all the help they can get when struggling with mental health issues, but I'm not sure that giving them a label that's often seen very pejoratively is the best way forward. It's possible to treat the symptoms that may or may not indicate a personality disorder (which I would still say is too difficult to diagnose in a 17 year old), and hopefully prevent future problems, without giving them this label.

    I've no idea if you've ever been told you have a personality disorder, but it can come as a real kick in the teeth. It's very easy to see it as being told there's something intrinsically wrong with you as a person - which is definitely not what you want to be saying to potentially vulnerable young people.
    • TSR Support Team
    • Peer Support Volunteers
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    Peer Support Volunteers
    (Original post by superwolf)
    I suspect that this isn't overly relevant to OP though.

    I agree that young people need all the help they can get when struggling with mental health issues, but I'm not sure that giving them a label that's often seen very pejoratively is the best way forward. It's possible to treat the symptoms that may or may not indicate a personality disorder (which I would still say is too difficult to diagnose in a 17 year old), and hopefully prevent future problems, without giving them this label.

    I've no idea if you've ever been told you have a personality disorder, but it can come as a real kick in the teeth. It's very easy to see it as being told there's something intrinsically wrong with you as a person - which is definitely not what you want to be saying to potentially vulnerable young people.
    PRSOM.
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Man.bear.pig)
    It varies. There are cases where the juvenile was always struggling with disorders and so they were slightly pardoned during sentencing. Others were sent to receive rehabilitation and counselling. Others were of course incarcerated if the crime was heinous enough or if the record is extensive enough and despite having PDs they were seen as lost causes and accepted as doomed to commit the crimes that they had committed because of their PDs and illnesses. Upon placement in detention centres youth are typically screened and assessed for mental disorders because it's such a high occurrence that their behavioural issues are linked to mental illness (depression, PTSD, ADHD, etc) exacerbated by substance abuse, often.

    It's quite a normal representation when you consider crime rate of certain areas, and regardless of area at least 50% of youth who commit crimes suffer from an illness found upon evaluation whether the school implored it or protocol upon being sentenced or sent to a reform school.
    You are only looking at a subgroup of individuals with BPD who have perpetrated violent crimes. So of course they are more likely to be diagnosed BPD, because firstly they're behaviour is on the more extreme end of the scale. And secondly, they probably present more severe symptoms, which leads to easier/ less ambiguous diagnosis.
    Thirdly, like you said they are often diagnosed after committing a crime, and therefore there's the mindset that there's something wrong with this individual, let's work out what this is. Whereas when diagnosing an individual whose behaviour is inline with what society expects, you are much less likely to have that sort of approach when diagnosing.

    Individuals like the OP who probably experience similar affect and thought processes to those with BPD, but do not display the behavioural symptoms are of course not going to be diagnosed with as much ease.

    Like others have said, a diagnosis of BPD is not a good thing, and may not be beneficial. So I can see why such individuals are more likely to be diagnosed with other illnesses such as GAD.

    That's what I think anyway
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by superwolf)
    I suspect that this isn't overly relevant to OP though.

    I agree that young people need all the help they can get when struggling with mental health issues, but I'm not sure that giving them a label that's often seen very pejoratively is the best way forward. It's possible to treat the symptoms that may or may not indicate a personality disorder (which I would still say is too difficult to diagnose in a 17 year old), and hopefully prevent future problems, without giving them this label.

    I've no idea if you've ever been told you have a personality disorder, but it can come as a real kick in the teeth. It's very easy to see it as being told there's something intrinsically wrong with you as a person - which is definitely not what you want to be saying to potentially vulnerable young people.
    It doesn't matter if it's relevant to OP. I was responding to you saying that 17 yr olds don't get diagnosed. I pointed out that they do, but the ones who do have chronically shown pathological behaviour/symptoms of disorders, or were evaluated upon being housed as a youth offender. Whether it relates to OP or not is irrelevant in itself. Teenagers get diagnosed and it's not nuts; it's critical to do so. You might take issue with it but it happens.


    Your sentimentality towards teenagers won't prevent the practice from being done.

    (Original post by Twinpeaks)
    You are only looking at a subgroup of individuals with BPD who have perpetrated violent crimes. So of course they are more likely to be diagnosed BPD, because firstly they're behaviour is on the more extreme end of the scale. And secondly, they probably present more severe symptoms, which leads to easier/ less ambiguous diagnosis.
    Thirdly, like you said they are often diagnosed after committing a crime, and therefore there's the mindset that there's something wrong with this individual, let's work out what this is. Whereas when diagnosing an individual whose behaviour is inline with what society expects, you are much less likely to have that sort of approach when diagnosing.

    Individuals like the OP who probably experience similar affect and thought processes to those with BPD, but do not display the behavioural symptoms are of course not going to be diagnosed with as much ease.

    Like others have said, a diagnosis of BPD is not a good thing, and may not be beneficial. So I can see why such individuals are more likely to be diagnosed with other illnesses such as GAD.

    That's what I think anyway
    I am only looking at a subgroup of individuals, as I was only pointing out that certain teenagers (thus...teenagers nonetheless) can and do get diagnosed all the time. I don't know why you and the other guy are discounting juvenile offenders as human beings. Whether they're criminals or not, they're still functioning as people. So the dogma that teenagers do not get diagnosed or treated for personality disorders is just inaccurate. As I've just provided an example, and there are even people in the thread who say they have PDs and were diagnosed as teenagers.
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Man.bear.pig)
    It doesn't matter if it's relevant to OP. I was responding to you saying that 17 yr olds don't get diagnosed. I pointed out that they do, but the ones who do have chronically shown pathological behaviour/symptoms of disorders, or were evaluated upon being housed as a youth offender. Whether it relates to OP or not is irrelevant in itself. Teenagers get diagnosed and it's not nuts; it's critical to do so. You might take issue with it but it happens.


    Your sentimentality towards teenagers won't prevent the practice from being done.



    I am only looking at a subgroup of individuals, as I was only pointing out that certain teenagers (thus...teenagers nonetheless) can and do get diagnosed all the time. I don't know why you and the other guy are discounting juvenile offenders as human beings. Whether they're criminals or not, they're still functioning as people. So the dogma that teenagers do not get diagnosed or treated for personality disorders is just inaccurate. As I've just provided an example, and there are even people in the thread who say they have PDs and were diagnosed as teenagers.
    We aren't discounting them as human beings. I'm just saying that you're argument against a person saying a diagnosis of BPD at a young age is rare might not be accurate because you are only considering that subgroup of individuals.

    Yeah, and even those who have got a diagnosis say it is rare, with one saying she is the youngest in her area to have a diagnosis.
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: June 28, 2015

1,122

students online now

800,000+

Exam discussions

Find your exam discussion here

Poll
Should predicted grades be removed from the uni application process

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.