Turn on thread page Beta
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Uz25)
    How is the pay like? Do u enjoy teaching? I'm Co side ring teaching but im going to try looking for work experience. ..
    The pay scales are all available online. You start on M1 and progress if you are deemed to be doing a good job. In most of England and Wales that means a starting salary of 22k.

    I enjoy it and find it very worthwhile. Every day is different. The kids are fab. The stuff we have to do when the kids have gone home for the day is not so fab!
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by TraineeLynsey)
    The pay scales are all available online. You start on M1 and progress if you are deemed to be doing a good job. In most of England and Wales that means a starting salary of 22k.

    I enjoy it and find it very worthwhile. Every day is different. The kids are fab. The stuff we have to do when the kids have gone home for the day is not so fab!
    Examples of the stuff u do at home after work? How much time do you spend after school and what do u do. .
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    Read my previous post in this thread. I've already posted an extensive break down detailing my 55-60 hour working week.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Veggiechic6)
    How do you progress up the pay scale and how often does it happen? I heard teachers only progress if their performance is good but I'm not sure how it's measured.
    Hi,

    It depends on your school as they have all implemented performance related pay in different ways. It's early days but I think my school is doing it fairly well.

    In my school, we have different brackets (M1-M3 = Teacher; M4-M6 = Established teacher; UPS1-2 = Accomplished teacher; UPS3 = Expert teacher).

    If you're within a bracket (eg: going from M2 to M3 or M4 to M5) you automatically go up each year, subject to passing your appraisal. Failing your appraisal would be really bad and I've not heard of it happening. So in general, people go up every year in the first couple of years, until they have reached M3 or M6 and would then need to apply for the next bracket up.

    There are descriptors for each bracket. For example, it says that an established teacher has Good/Outstanding lesson observations, shows excellent subject knowledge, has an understanding of barriers to learning and makes adaptations to meet pupils' needs, takes on an extra responsibility within the department (eg: writing SoW/assessments for a particular year group), helps support/train other staff, etc.

    So I read the criteria, decided I had evidence of meeting the standards for M4 (from lesson observations, training I'd run, feedback from parents/pupils in emails, etc.), and put together an application, and got it.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by TraineeLynsey)
    You start on M1 and progress
    Not necessarily.For some reason the school that hired me for my NQT year started me on M2. Maybe they have money to throw around...
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Squoosh25)
    Not necessarily.For some reason the school that hired me for my NQT year started me on M2. Maybe they have money to throw around...
    Show off. ;P

    (Seriously, I'm exceedingly jealous).
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by TraineeLynsey)
    Show off. ;P

    (Seriously, I'm exceedingly jealous).
    I wouldn't be that jealous: it's only 1 or 2 thousand more, and as an English trainee with a 1st I got a £9000 bursary to cover the £9000 course-costs, whereas science and maths trainees get over 20,000 for no other reason than the fact they are in shorter supply. They're the ones to be jealous of!
    • TSR Support Team
    • Wiki Support Team
    • PS Reviewer
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    Wiki Support Team
    PS Reviewer
    (Original post by Squoosh25)
    I wouldn't be that jealous: it's only 1 or 2 thousand more, and as an English trainee with a 1st I got a £9000 bursary to cover the £9000 course-costs, whereas science and maths trainees get over 20,000 for no other reason than the fact they are in shorter supply. They're the ones to be jealous of!
    I know a computing teacher who got the £20k bursary and convinced her new school to start her at m3 because they need her to write a whole new years worth of SoW as soon as she gets there.

    I am tres jealous but also couldn't imagine that much stress in my nqt year.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ParadoxSocks)
    I know a computing teacher who got the £20k bursary and convinced her new school to start her at m3 because they need her to write a whole new years worth of SoW as soon as she gets there.

    T

    I am tres jealous but also couldn't imagine that much stress in my nqt year.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Don't goout of topics plz it's mytrend .
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Uz25)
    Examples of the stuff u do at home after work? How much time do you spend after school and what do u do. .
    Planning lessons, finding and producing powerpoints, worksheets, etc. This is the largest part of my workload as I now teach 27 lessons per week (24 during my NQT year).

    Marking exercise books (Primary - 30ish kids but books marked every day for literacy/numeracy/whatever other subject they've done; Secondary - 200+ kids but marked less frequently).

    Other marking - assessments, homework tasks, exam papers.

    Data entry - for KS3 we have to do levels every term and also each pupil a score for attitude, homework, equipment and presentation. For KS4 it's the same but instead of a level we do current attainment as a GCSE grade, and a predicted grade if they continue to work at their current rate.

    Communication with parents - phoning home about behaviour etc., parents' evenings, writing reports (only once per year for my mentor group but it's a big job when it comes up).

    Running after-school booster sessions for GCSE pupils (1 hour per week).

    Other paperwork as required - for example, analysis of GCSE pupils who are underachieving and what you plan to do about it. Responding to snapshots about behaviour or SEN pupils.


    I'm currently on a bit of a lighter week because a lot of my pupils have assessments this week which means less planning for their lessons. But then that will mean a lot of extra marking (3 sets of Year 7 reading/writing assessments, 2 sets of Y10 speaking assessments) over half-term.

    It really is endless and something needs to be done about workload (personally I think contact hours need to be cut so that we have more time during the school day for all the marking etc. - the expectation that everyone will go home and work for another 3-5 hours needs to end) but ultimately if you enjoy teaching I wouldn't let it stop you.
    Offline

    4
    ReputationRep:
    I really wanted to become a teacher because mine have inspired me so much and I would love to have the chance to be that for someone else. However the more I think about it the more I worry it won't be a good career choice because we see a lot on the news about disruptions, pay, lay offs etc?


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Uz25)
    Don't goout of topics plz it's mytrend .
    You've asked about salary and workload. No one has gone off topic. We've been continuing to share examples of different salary levels and workloads.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    I'm going into FE and from what I can find online..

    Unqualified lecturers should be paid on 4 point scale - points 15, 17, 20 and 21 on the harmonised pay spine. Lowest (point 15) is £19,008 and highest here is £22,575 (point 21).

    As a qualified FE lecturer, lowest pay annually would be £23,952 and highest is £36,162.

    Higher salaries than this are for advanced teaching and training posts (points 37-41) and a pay range for leadership and management posts (points 37-68). [https://www.atl.org.uk/pay/pay-scale...on-england.asp ]


    This doesn't seem bad to me however I am currently on a much lower wage than the first qualified lecturer pay scale point. I imagine most of us go into teaching for the passion of teaching/our subject(s) rather than the cash, although yes, considering the workload and hours of all teachers it does seem a low wage. I agree with the other poster, rather than throwing money at us a better work/life balance is surely preferable. Mind you, I do like money, ha!
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by myrtille)
    Planning lessons, finding and producing powerpoints, worksheets, etc. This is the largest part of my workload as I now teach 27 lessons per week (24 during my NQT year).

    Marking exercise books (Primary - 30ish kids but books marked every day for literacy/numeracy/whatever other subject they've done; Secondary - 200+ kids but marked less frequently).

    Other marking - assessments, homework tasks, exam papers.

    Data entry - for KS3 we have to do levels every term and also each pupil a score for attitude, homework, equipment and presentation. For KS4 it's the same but instead of a level we do current attainment as a GCSE grade, and a predicted grade if they continue to work at their current rate.

    Communication with parents - phoning home about behaviour etc., parents' evenings, writing reports (only once per year for my mentor group but it's a big job when it comes up).

    Running after-school booster sessions for GCSE pupils (1 hour per week).

    Other paperwork as required - for example, analysis of GCSE pupils who are underachieving and what you plan to do about it. Responding to snapshots about behaviour or SEN pupils.


    I'm currently on a bit of a lighter week because a lot of my pupils have assessments this week which means less planning for their lessons. But then that will mean a lot of extra marking (3 sets of Year 7 reading/writing assessments, 2 sets of Y10 speaking assessments) over half-term.

    It really is endless and something needs to be done about workload (personally I think contact hours need to be cut so that we have more time during the school day for all the marking etc. - the expectation that everyone will go home and work for another 3-5 hours needs to end) but ultimately if you enjoy teaching I wouldn't let it stop you.
    You know primary school teachers do they produce the powerpoint presentation everyday? Do they only teach one class?..

    Do they only teach eng maths and science?

    How often does your salary increase. ?

    Is primary schoolteachinglessstressful compared to secondary school teaching mind the spaces... . .
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Uz25)
    You know primary school teachers do they produce the powerpoint presentation everyday? Do they only teach one class?..

    Do they only teach eng maths and science?

    How often does your salary increase. ?

    Is primary schoolteachinglessstressful compared to secondary school teaching mind the spaces... . .
    I don't know much about primary teaching - hopefully someone else will respond to your questions.

    I don't think powerpoint is as heavily used in Primary as in Secondary, but teachers do produce a lot of resources of various types.

    Teachers are normally responsible for one main class, although in KS2 there are sometimes different English/Maths sets so they might teach different groups of pupils. Or if a teacher is responsible for a specific subject area (eg: languages, music, PE) they might spend a bit more time teaching that subject to other classes, rather than spending all their time with their own class.

    They teach a LOT of Maths and English. I think in many schools they do these subjects every day in the morning, with the remaining subjects (Science, History, Geography, RS, Art, PE, ICT, MFL) crammed into the afternoons. Subjects are often combined together as "Topic" for a more cross-curricular approach.

    How often your salary increases depends on your school and how they have implemented Performance Related Pay. It could be every year in the early years, but it's not a given any more. It can increase at other points in the year if you're in a system like my school where you can apply for a pay rise at 3 different points throughout the year.

    I don't think either is more/less stressful, I think they're both stressful in different ways. I do get the impression that Primary teachers are under even more arbitrary and ridiculous pressures than Secondary in some schools. I've heard of primary teachers being criticised/NQTs being failed based on things as trivial as their displays not being updated regularly enough.
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    All teaching is stressful. The hours or work are roughly the same in primary and secondary.

    Different schools have slightly differing pay policies, but generally you will move up the pay scale if you are judged to be performing well by the governors of the school.

    Don't go into teaching for the pay. If you work it out as an hourly wage there are many far better paying jobs around.

    As far as PowerPoint presentations etc go, all schools have different expectations of this. I use a minimum of 2 a day. Some days I could use 6. It depends on the lessons I am teaching that day.

    I have one class of 28 children. I teach them numeracy, reading, writing, spelling/punctuation/grammar, handwriting, science, geography, history, RE, PSHCE, French, computing, art, DT... They have a sports coach who does their PE and they have a specialist music teacher doing ukuleles with them. Everything else is all me.

    Again, I stress - do not consider going into teaching if your primary reason for doing so is the money. You need to enjoy it and believe that it is worthwhile or you'll be a drop out statistic in no time.

    (Original post by Uz25)
    You know primary school teachers do they produce the powerpoint presentation everyday? Do they only teach one class?..

    Do they only teach eng maths and science?

    How often does your salary increase. ?

    Is primary schoolteachinglessstressful compared to secondary school teaching mind the spaces... . .
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    I don't see how some teachers choose to be teachers with that kind of workload and pay, particularly for those from STEM backgrounds. Like, they could be earning a higher salary stright out of university and making bigger bucks later on in life and (at the start of their career) work less hours. Same could be said really for those coming from about 90% of disciplines.

    What attracts people to become teachers?
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Killerpenguin15)
    I don't see how some teachers choose to be teachers with that kind of workload and pay, particularly for those from STEM backgrounds. Like, they could be earning a higher salary stright out of university and making bigger bucks later on in life and (at the start of their career) work less hours. Same could be said really for those coming from about 90% of disciplines.

    What attracts people to become teachers?
    For some people, a high salary isn't the be all and end all of a career. The attractions of teaching are rather obvious, I suggest you think a bit harder, I'm sure you can answer your own question.
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    Variety. Hilarity. Meaning. A sense of worth in what you do. Hilarity (again - seriously, kids are like living, breathing joke books).

    No one goes into it for the money. People who care about the size of their salary (beyond the necessary "can I afford to eat?" sort of concern) aren't the kind of people who go into teaching.

    The world needs all sorts. I would love to be a bit more financially stable, but I gave that up for a more meaningful job. Other people would be happier keeping criminals out of jail or trading commodities (whatever that means) for 5x what I earn. That's fine, but it's not for me.
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Veggiechic6)
    For some people, a high salary isn't the be all and end all of a career. The attractions of teaching are rather obvious, I suggest you think a bit harder, I'm sure you can answer your own question.
    Hehe.
 
 
 

2,297

students online now

800,000+

Exam discussions

Find your exam discussion here

Poll
Should predicted grades be removed from the uni application process

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.