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    (Original post by jelly1000)
    I found the work to be different- and far more time consuming, than most A-Level work rather than necessarily harder, this was doing International Relations. History coursework at A-Level was an exception but that aside, most A-Level work I could bash out in a couple of hours. Where uni coursework was concerned however my first essay took me a week to read for and a week to write. Once I got the hang of things I did get quicker- but still only down to a week for the whole thing unless I didn't have that amount of time left before the deadline (usually when I had multiple deadlines at once).
    Ok so you found the workload for coursework was very time consuming but you didn't really find it that more difficult.

    That makes sense I guess since essays are probably going to have be longer than a couple of pages which they tended to be at A level.
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    (Original post by kingdoo)
    Ok so you found the workload for coursework was very time consuming but you didn't really find it that more difficult.

    That makes sense I guess since essays are probably going to have be longer than a couple of pages which they tended to be at A level.
    Compared to the majority of my A-Level work- answering past exam paper q's, the essays I did at uni were a lot longer- 2,000+ words, had to be answered in a totally different style to an A-Level exam answer and you couldn' just pluck all your information from one textbook, you had to read and make notes from several different sources first. It was however very like the History Coursework I did at A2- 4,000 words, had to be analytical, use references except I got several months to write that.
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    (Original post by Dalightfool)
    Regarding BAs:

    It all comes down to how much you want to do the work. If you are engaged in the topic and read around it for pleasure then you will find it challenging (it's higher education) but completely doable. If you have trouble organising your time, fail to keep track of which work is required for when, and generally have a loose connection to your course, then you will find it not just hard but impossible to get a first and probably a two-one.

    I speak from experience, as someone who willy-ed around during his first year and subsequently decided to leave after failing my first year.

    It is work: all you have to do is focus and put in the hours. If you fall behind you can catch up but you will have to make sacrifices in other areas of your life. If you have a learning difficulty then your uni should assist you, so really there is no reason to "fail" should you put in a considerable amount of effort.
    Yeah that is something I am worried about because I hate reading books. I have two problems with books 1 I don't find them very engaging and prefer to look things up online which is generally quicker but obviously tends to be more inaccurate but also 2 I get ill reading books for a long period of time (like over 30mins) and it messes with my head and I get very sleepy because of it.

    If I could get audio versions or could get them up electronically then I should be fine or if the books are of a decent size as I think it is the size of the text that makes me feel sick when reading for too long.

    I don't feel I am the type of person to leave his school work to the last minute, I am more likely to neglect socialising, and other things especially since I am interested/passionate about the subject I am taking.
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    (Original post by kingdoo)
    Yeah that is something I am worried about because I hate reading books. I have two problems with books 1 I don't find them very engaging and prefer to look things up online which is generally quicker but obviously tends to be more inaccurate but also 2 I get ill reading books for a long period of time (like over 30mins) and it messes with my head and I get very sleepy because of it.

    If I could get audio versions or could get them up electronically then I should be fine or if the books are of a decent size as I think it is the size of the text that makes me feel sick when reading for too long.

    I don't feel I am the type of person to leave his school work to the last minute, I am more likely to neglect socialising, and other things especially since I am interested/passionate about the subject I am taking.
    in terms of reading books at uni you generally aren't reading a book like a story, you are going straight to the index to find the relevant information out, so you'll only ever 'read' a fraction of the book. And their are accurate online sources you can use at uni- journals, your uni should have a subscription to at least some of them you can find via sites such as jstor and google scholar
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    I'd say difficulty also depends on what youre judging it by and your strengths. If i judged the difficulty of my degree by the exams then I'd say that my degree was extremely hard. But I'm extremely bad at exams.
    Judge my degree difficulty by the assignments and id say that it was fairly easy. But thats because I'm good at churning out words and forming arguments and disscussions.
    If i was just judging difficulty by course content then my course is a mixed bag. Some modules are very taxing (biomechanics I'm looking at you), while some are easy.

    Sometimes first year can be harder than 2nd year because it has to teach you all the information you need, whereas in second year its more about the wider implications, etc of said information, so its less facts to learn.
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    The difficulty of a degree depends on what degree you take and which university you go too. Having done law at a Russell group university, I knew that my degree was harder than my friends who did the same degree at a less prestigious university.


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    (Original post by Macleod11)
    Anyone know how challenging a degree in teaching is...?
    Teaching can be quite challenging in that you'll have assignments to do in multiple subjects at once, and very different forms of assessment (at my uni anyway). A lot of work has to be fitted into a short amount of time due to placements.


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    (Original post by maryamzahid)
    The difficulty of a degree depends on what degree you take and which university you go too. Having done law at a Russell group university, I knew that my degree was harder than my friends who did the same degree at a less prestigious university.


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    Not true at all. A degree puts the ball in the student's court. The courses and their content don't vary much from institution to institution; teaching may vary and resources might vary, but the substance and assessment of degrees across the board are fairly standardised.

    A person studying English at a 'top 10' uni could make their degree easier than a person studying English at a uni ranked 80 simply by not investing as much effort into their work.

    It all comes down to how much students challenge themselves. It's higher education, designed to see what the student can do when they put their mind to their course. Questions on assignments tend to be generic and open-ended, leaving it up to the student as to how complex they make their argument.
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    well personally i find uni a lot easier than a levels...
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    Easy
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    For me uni is harder and it's not cause I study two subjects, but i I think it's because of the content and not the subject. For instance, I find English not interesting but it takes up a lot of time to read your set texts then read critical theories and then read context and etc so it takes a longer time. I think Humanities' courses are harder in terms of content and context because there's a lot to process.

    I may be ignorant but for maths or physics there's equations but for English there's essays to read, to reread, to write and etc and Ive seen people study BSc and they don't have to read rtwice as much as I do, but then again, they have labs and etc.

    The one thing I did find hard was the amount of essays I was given. I was used to it as 2/3 A-levels were c/w so deadlines weren't an issue. But at uni, they ask you to do 3 or 4 3000 worded essays that all have to be handed in on the same week so you have to plan your time very effectively. I also found it hard "switching" from English to History when I had to. But Im speaking for a joints honours point of view.
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    I did Law and I didn't find the actual work that hard, as in the concepts and stuff weren't difficult. It's just that there is a lot of it. In my first two years I couldn't be bothered learning huge amounts of content so I just picked random topics and kept getting 2.2s. In final year I spent more time learning a wider range of the topics covered and got 2.1s and firsts.
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    On the whole, I found first year a lot less work than A Levels. Ancient History was especially pretty easy to get through, I swear I never had work for it :lol: Biology involved a lot more work though, we had set tasks all year round.

    This will probably change in second year though

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    how hard is medicine? like first year? anyone?
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    Anyone know how challenging management at City university is?


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    (Original post by The Empire Odyssey)
    For me uni is harder and it's not cause I study two subjects, but i I think it's because of the content and not the subject. For instance, I find English not interesting but it takes up a lot of time to read your set texts then read critical theories and then read context and etc so it takes a longer time. I think Humanities' courses are harder in terms of content and context because there's a lot to process.

    I may be ignorant but for maths or physics there's equations but for English there's essays to read, to reread, to write and etc and Ive seen people study BSc and they don't have to read rtwice as much as I do, but then again, they have labs and etc.

    The one thing I did find hard was the amount of essays I was given. I was used to it as 2/3 A-levels were c/w so deadlines weren't an issue. But at uni, they ask you to do 3 or 4 3000 worded essays that all have to be handed in on the same week so you have to plan your time very effectively. I also found it hard "switching" from English to History when I had to. But Im speaking for a joints honours point of view.
    I agree here, like before I decided to transfer I did law with criminology and realised how much the work load is. University is hard, whoever said it was a walk in the park really needs to think a little straighter. My friends who do maths actually find it ok as they learn without having to read masses of books.


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    Is writing essays just finding info and paraphrasing other people's work with a reference list at the end?
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    hows psychology?
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    I don't think the content is the hardest part - the hardest part is no longer being spoon fed. You literally have to go off and research topics with reading lists (I did a humanities course) and they won't be text books that you can just skip through. That's what I found the struggle - having like 5 lectures in one day all with assignments for the seminars and a long reading list for each to actually teach yourself about the topic before you're in a seminar being asked questions/opinions in front of your peers and then being sent off tho write a 3000 word essay on it.
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    (Original post by Alba2013)
    Is writing essays just finding info and paraphrasing other people's work with a reference list at the end?
    No. I do a science degree and assignments require me to find the info, compare and contrast to others in the form of arguments for and against (or whatever is relevant). I then have to find the limitations of key studies, and limitations to the area in general. Then suggest new directions to head in and possible conclusions that can be come to given all the research available.
    There's even more to it than that. Just paraphrasing wouldn't even allow you to pass on my course, not even in 1st year when less was expected of us.
 
 
 

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