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The best way to sort out achy muscles? watch

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    (Original post by ab992502)
    Where can I get one from and for how much?


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    Companies like www.physique.co.uk have a good range or you can find them in most high street sports shops

    If you are dancing all day, every day invest in a good quality sports massage every few weeks as well. Highly qualified therapists can be found through either the Sports Massage Association (www.thesma.org) or the Institute of Sports and Remedial Massage (www.theisrm.com) or PM me and I may be able to give a recommendation depending on where you live

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    (Original post by RollerBall)
    Lots of *******s in here.

    There is no evidence that stretching or foam rolling or massage pre/post or intra workout has any effect on limiting post work out soreness.

    There is limited (read: sketchy) evidence that stretching or foam rolling/massage can provide temporary relief during the episode of muscle soreness (it's not going to be a miracle worker mind) but it is not better than a generalised warm up and it will return once you're no longer exercising.

    There is evidence to support cold showers, ice baths and sea swimming (the things studies use, eh) following exercise to limit the duration and intensity of muscle soreness post exercise.

    My general advice regarding DOMS is, if you think it's gonna be real bad - lots of eccentric load after time off - to take a cold shower immediately following exercise. I dont think cold showers are really required for most trainees after the initial couple of sessions. If you've missed your opportunity then it's simply a matter of time.

    Don't skip training unless the pain is still interfering and problematic after a proper warm up. With time, the incidence will generally subside or become less of a problem as you become more accustomed to training.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    You get a massage and it stops hurting afterwards. What more evidence do you need? haha
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    (Original post by RollerBall)
    Lots of *******s in here.

    There is no evidence that stretching or foam rolling or massage pre/post or intra workout has any effect on limiting post work out soreness.

    There is limited (read: sketchy) evidence that stretching or foam rolling/massage can provide temporary relief during the episode of muscle soreness (it's not going to be a miracle worker mind) but it is not better than a generalised warm up and it will return once you're no longer exercising.

    There is evidence to support cold showers, ice baths and sea swimming (the things studies use, eh) following exercise to limit the duration and intensity of muscle soreness post exercise.

    My general advice regarding DOMS is, if you think it's gonna be real bad - lots of eccentric load after time off - to take a cold shower immediately following exercise. I dont think cold showers are really required for most trainees after the initial couple of sessions. If you've missed your opportunity then it's simply a matter of time.

    Don't skip training unless the pain is still interfering and problematic after a proper warm up. With time, the incidence will generally subside or become less of a problem as you become more accustomed to training.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Doesn't the cold treatment also reduce muscle protein synthesis (which is induced in part by local acute inflammation)?

    I'd just say eat more. That seems to help.
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    a good old massage.
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    (Original post by SmashConcept)
    Doesn't the cold treatment also reduce muscle protein synthesis (which is induced in part by local acute inflammation)?

    I'd just say eat more. That seems to help.
    Supposedly - I think it's why NSAIDs are advised against for it. I'm not very familiar with the inflammation debate tbh.

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    Massage obv..
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    (Original post by Mike the MOG)
    It's funny but the British Journal of Sports Medicine disagrees with you

    http://m.bjsm.bmj.com/content/37/1/72.short

    Please feel free to back up your claims with suitable evidence

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    I've read that paper before - I should have been more specific. They examined the use of a massage two hours post workout. I don't think most people would define two hours as post workout. They also talk about the subjective (read: not strongly validated) nature of the questionnaire they used to measure pain also - in their discussion they aren't as definitive about their outcomes.

    This isn't relevant to the opie anyway, by the time you've already got DOMS it doesn't do anything. There's another paper looking at immediately following workout using calf raises, where they found no statistical differences against controls I can find for you when I'm not on my phone.

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    Based on OP's description of her training routine it sounds like she's beyond a simple case of DOMs anyway, and into the territory of overuse injuries which can be improved with massage & soft tissue techniques.

    The subjective nature of assessing the effects of massage in an academic setting will always be an issue however you're heading towards the nirvana / perfect solution fallacy by saying it's bad research just because there's some subjectivity in the assessment.

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