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Why shouldn't I work in my first year? watch

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    To be honest I found my first year quite easy apart from one module, I mostly did the minimum amount of work but it ended up giving me grades that were all over the place. My course only required me to get Ds in my first year to continue so a lot of people were satisfied with that and didn't feel like they needed to put in a lot of work. However now I'm in a position where I need to drag my GPA up this year to hopefully get onto a placement year so it's just made me need to work harder in second year.

    It really depends on what you're happy with, if you don't mind having a few bad grades you don't really need to try so hard in first year but if it's going to bother you then do as much work as you feel comfortable with


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    Or do what most people do study all day like a 9-5 job relax in the evening and get a Saturday job at weekend? Remind yourself that u won't get am degree if you laze around in your pjs all year round and you rest after study or when your in your 70-80s but from now onwards it's study study study and part times job.


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    (Original post by NotQuiteThor)
    Does everybody feel as if first year is entirely futile?
    Think of this: if you went to university to have fun: then paying £9000 per year is very expensive to have some fun. It is cheaper to have a long, extended holiday for a smaller cost of university if you went for fun.

    First year degree classification is not futile. It will impact your future prospects to an extent. Each of your modules - along with their grade - will be displayed on the final degree transcript. Employers will ask why you performed badly during the first year, and then changed during the second and third years

    What this demonstrates to employers is that you are a lazy student; if you provide little effort where the risk is low, then how can they trust you to do an adequate job for the role you are submitting for. How can someone trust a student who slacks from their responsibilities when it is not needed. The perspective you should be aware from an employer's point of view: the student can work when they are under pressure, or meeting important deadlines; but as soon as they stop, can you trust that person to continue working when they have little pressure?

    First year modules are of equal importance to second and third year prospects for employability.

    Importance of First Year is a pre-requisite to the second and third year modules. It teaches you the basics, and separates the slackers from the students. If you do not listen during the first year, the subsequent years can be much difficult extending on the first year's topics.

    Ultimately, it comes down to your objective: did you go to university to pay £9000 per year to have fun; or did you come to achieve a successful academic degree?
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    I don't agree that the first year in university doesn't matter at all. It helps you to get used to the lectures. Also you will learn a lot of subjects, that will help you during your next years. In addition, don't forget about the social life. The first year is a good opportunity to meet new people. Think about it)
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    To tell the truth, I don't see why you shouldn't work in your first year... If you feel that you can handle it, go on..
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    (Original post by claireestelle)
    I never felt that way at all, first year gives you the skills to do well in second (and beyond).
    So its worth putting the work in whilst its an easier level of work so you get the hang of writing academically and referencing but if you don't try in 1st year and get the hang of these skills then you ll find second year onwards pretty hard.
    ^^^ Absolutely right and very well put.
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    Guys so when is it best to start studying, reading, committing to your reading lists?
    I'm in week 2 and am just to tired to even read, have been out of education since June when I left college, when shall I start studying for business course, even try and attempt to?
    How many hrs, all this talk about less hours others say study what's best?


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    (Original post by SlowedCash)
    Guys so when is it best to start studying, reading, committing to your reading lists?
    I'm in week 2 and am just to tired to even read, have been out of education since June when I left college, when shall I start studying for business course, even try and attempt to?
    How many hrs, all this talk about less hours others say study what's best?


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    It's never too early.

    Do you understand why you're so tired? Uni will probably have far fewer contact hours than college, so that's unlikely to be a factor. Are you working as well as going to uni? Do you have a long commute to/from campus? The first trick is to identify the causes of your fatigue, so you can address them - or at least dial them down a bit so you have the energy to concentrate on your studies.
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    (Original post by SlowedCash)
    Guys so when is it best to start studying, reading, committing to your reading lists?
    I'm in week 2 and am just to tired to even read, have been out of education since June when I left college, when shall I start studying for business course, even try and attempt to?
    How many hrs, all this talk about less hours others say study what's best?


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    I started reading and making notes from week one because my course demanded so much and i didn't want to be behind and it left me less panicked by the time exams came around
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    (Original post by Klix88)
    It's never too early.

    Do you understand why you're so tired? Uni will probably have far fewer contact hours than college, so that's unlikely to be a factor. Are you working as well as going to uni? Do you have a long commute to/from campus? The first trick is to identify the causes of your fatigue, so you can address them - or at least dial them down a bit so you have the energy to concentrate on your studies.
    I commute 4 hours a day 2 there 2 back. Probably why lol.


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    (Original post by temi.h.o.)
    I started reading and making notes from week one because my course demanded so much and i didn't want to be behind and it left me less panicked by the time exams came around
    Gosh that's early, I dropped out today as we speak so there , I couldn't cope with any of it. The studying, the note taking all of it, it's not me I'm cut out for work whatever it is retail volunteering, but no study.


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    First year is an opportunity not to worry too much. As in, you will probably have a few dud pieces of work while you're learning what the expectations are. But you should put the work in so you can learn these things. Give yourself some confidence for second year and learn how you work best and how much time you need etc. There are lots of new skills at uni and first year is your time to learn these skills before it really counts.

    The people saying first year doesn't count at the ones who will come out with a 2.2
 
 
 
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