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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    If you like business management, I guess.. It's not as respected as a traditional academic subject, but it's more about the university you go to anyway.

    Aim for the targets (Oxbridge, LSE, UCL, Warwick, Imperial) and semis (Nottingham, Bristol, Durham, Edinburgh, KCL, Cass etc) if you want a decent shot at a revenue generating role in IB.

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    thanks for replying, im not really a mathematical guy thats why i dont want to do economics but i still have it as an option and would i be at a disadvantage because i will graduate when im 25/26?
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    (Original post by fasial96.)
    thanks for replying, im not really a mathematical guy thats why i dont want to do economics but i still have it as an option and would i be at a disadvantage because i will graduate when im 25/26?
    No, most continental europeans join IB at that age.
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    (Original post by preetg97)
    I know the situation you're in, trust me! I've dropped out of university and I'm taking a year out because I figured that dentistry would be more interesting than my original course - so I've been doing work experience and working in a dentists for a few weeks.

    Just don't stress yourself about needing to decide just yet, because if worst comes to worse you can always try out one course then take a gap year and re-apply to the other.

    Good luck.
    Hey! I didn't realise how much of a similar situation we're in, I've also dropped out of a course to apply for dentistry, haha!
    Where did you do optometry?
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    (Original post by MAnnaMM)
    Hey! I didn't realise how much of a similar situation we're in, I've also dropped out of a course to apply for dentistry, haha!
    Where did you do optometry?
    Aston So what were you doing?
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    (Original post by preetg97)
    Aston So what were you doing?
    Physics at KCL
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    (Original post by MAnnaMM)
    Physics at KCL
    Ah no way! That's a pretty big change to make haha
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    (Original post by 0123456543210)
    Which university have you graduated from, if you don't mind me asking?
    I'm sure you can guess :-) But I'll tell you if you can tell me why it's relevant :-)
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Point 4 is BS. When I was at a large Magic Circle firm, a good 40-50% of the trainees spent time in HK, Paris, New York, Dubai and a bunch of other international cities. Some even did secondments at a different companies abroad. That said, I agree to an extent, for most non-commonwealth countries practising law can be quite challenging. Basicalky, aim for the large international companies and you'll be able to get opportunities to work abroad.

    Plus any jobs an econ grad applies for a law grad can get, with the exception of if said econ grad chooses to pursue a PhD in Econ then becomes a fully fledged economist.
    You can work abroad for some time, it's true - and a number of my friends have; mostly during traineeship, you;ll agree. But they have nearly always had to return home at some stage to work. Why? Because developing a practise abroad requires a different bar/ls exam for each jurisdiction. Those who wanted to practise for any length of time abroad often had to re-qualify and a number of my friends returned back to the UK for just that reason. And those that did return back found that they were behind their colleagues in UK relevant experience. Economists can work as such anywhere without re/qualification.

    "Plus any jobs an econ grad applies for a law grad can get"

    Really? So jobs advertised with words to the effect "A first class or good upper second in economics is required" etc are merely fictional?
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    (Original post by Stychomythia)
    You can work abroad for some time, it's true - and a number of my friends have; mostly during traineeship, you;ll agree. But they have nearly always had to return home at some stage to work. Why? Because developing a practise abroad requires a different bar/ls exam for each jurisdiction. Those who wanted to practise for any length of time abroad often had to re-qualify and a number of my friends returned back to the UK for just that reason. And those that did return back found that they were behind their colleagues in UK relevant experience. Economists can work as such anywhere without re/qualification.

    "Plus any jobs an econ grad applies for a law grad can get"

    Really? So jobs advertised with words to the effect "A first class or good upper second in economics is required" etc are merely fictional?
    My point was general, it is very rare you will come across a job description with that exact phrasing - it would say it was 'preferred' but not 'essential'.

    You don't have to re-qualify to work in Dubai, HK, Singapore or several other commonwealth countries because they use the same legal system that we use in England and Wales. Especially so for the large deals undertaken by the large firms, it's very much possible to forge a career overseas. The main barrier would be a theoretical 'foreigner glass ceiling' but those largely don't exist at the level of firm I'm thinking of.

    It really is swings and roundabouts, the job market for specialist economics jobs is extremely narrow - the others are irrelevant to your argument as they would be open to numerate individuals anyway - so relying on a very tiny cross section of the market to bolster your point is similar to me saying that Bill Gates and Steve Jobs dropped out university, thus, university drop outs are overwhelmingly successful.


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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Did you miss the bit about your salary is dependant on the company/role you aim for?!?! Your degree (especially as both of these are not professional degrees) does not equate to a salary...

    Just choose a degree that you'd prefer doing then research the careers/companies you want to aim for.

    Unistats is probably the worst reference point for it (small sample sizes of 30-60 people), go on glassdoor to see what graduates are making in the jobs/companies you would want to work for instead.

    I can tell you right now, a trainee at the firm I was at for an internship earns about £41k when they start - so again, just don't equate your degree to a salary.
    This!
    Don't choose a degree because of the salary - personally I'd rather do a job I love and have a smaller salary than a job I hated with a large salary.
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    (Original post by 0123456543210)
    Hi.
    First of all, I really couldn't decide on whether I should do Law or Economics at undergraduate level, as I really loved both, but at the end I have decided to choose law. Now, however, I am on the brink of sending my application to several Law schools and I am having a second thought about economics, that just kills me. This uncertainty makes me want to skip applying at all.

    Please help, I really don't know what do do now?
    What about Joint degrees? There's Law and economics at:
    - University of Edinbrugh
    -university of kent
    - university of Strathclyde
    these are undergraduates

    If you want to be a lawyer you can try doing the Economics degree then doing a conversion course

    Orrr you can get an undergrad in law then do a joint masters in law and economics there are a lot of unis offering that.

    (lol i've researched alot cuz i was looking at law or finance and came across similar options a while back)
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    My point was general, it is very rare you will come across a job description with that exact phrasing - it would say it was 'preferred' but not 'essential'.

    You don't have to re-qualify to work in Dubai, HK, Singapore or several other commonwealth countries because they use the same legal system that we use in England and Wales. Especially so for the large deals undertaken by the large firms, it's very much possible to forge a career overseas. The main barrier would be a theoretical 'foreigner glass ceiling' but those largely don't exist at the level of firm I'm thinking of.

    It really is swings and roundabouts, the job market for specialist economics jobs is extremely narrow - the others are irrelevant to your argument as they would be open to numerate individuals anyway - so relying on a very tiny cross section of the market to bolster your point is similar to me saying that Bill Gates and Steve Jobs dropped out university, thus, university drop outs are overwhelmingly successful.

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    "My point was general, it is very rare you will come across a job description with that exact phrasing - it would say it was 'preferred' but not 'essential'".

    i agree, your point is more general - but in any case that qualification is distinctly less bullish than your opening statement. And have a look: those jobs are less rare than you realise especially in banking and finance. Indeed in competition/trade/banking law some firms/companies prefer a first degree in economics over law

    "You don't have to re-qualify to work in Dubai, HK, Singapore or several other commonwealth countries because they use the same legal system that we use in England and Wales."

    Singapore is common-law based, except Constitutional and admin law, HK is 'half' common-law based (and decreasing fast) and Dubai's legal system bears no resemblance to the common law whatsoever. Most work done in those jurisdictions by UK firms (in earnings terms) is transactional law for listings on the LSE, FCA/PRA compliance and product listing, etc But even if you're advising on property finance (as a friend of mine did in HK) when it comes to a conveyance you have to hand it over to an HK lawyer.

    However, we're getting away from the point. How should 0123456543210 decide? And my point stands. If 0123456543210 wants to be a lawyer later s/he will find no shortage of firms interested in a lawyer with an economics degree. Getting into finance with a law degree is trickier. But in any case, Law is a more vocational subject - and if 0123456543210 lacks that vocation s/he should probably do a degree with less specific application.
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    (Original post by Stychomythia)
    "My point was general, it is very rare you will come across a job description with that exact phrasing - it would say it was 'preferred' but not 'essential'".

    i agree, your point is more general - but in any case that qualification is distinctly less bullish than your opening statement. And have a look: those jobs are less rare than you realise especially in banking and finance. Indeed in competition/trade/banking law some firms/companies prefer a first degree in economics over law

    "You don't have to re-qualify to work in Dubai, HK, Singapore or several other commonwealth countries because they use the same legal system that we use in England and Wales."

    Singapore is common-law based, except Constitutional and admin law, HK is 'half' common-law based (and decreasing fast) and Dubai's legal system bears no resemblance to the common law whatsoever. Most work done in those jurisdictions by UK firms (in earnings terms) is transactional law for listings on the LSE, FCA/PRA compliance and product listing, etc But even if you're advising on property finance (as a friend of mine did in HK) when it comes to a conveyance you have to hand it over to an HK lawyer.

    However, we're getting away from the point. How should 0123456543210 decide? And my point stands. If 0123456543210 wants to be a lawyer later s/he will find no shortage of firms interested in a lawyer with an economics degree. Getting into finance with a law degree is trickier. But in any case, Law is a more vocational subject - and if 0123456543210 lacks that vocation s/he should probably do a degree with less specific application.
    All good points, except your last one. Law is an academic degree. You aren't qualified to give legal advice with just a Law degree, you are, however, able to: present solid arguments, analyse statements, craft counterarguments etc. At the undergrad level, it is like any other social science/humanities subject and resembles Econonics in many ways.

    It's really not difficult to get into finance with a Law degree because firms do not discriminate on degree (within reason, underwater basket weaving is unlikely to pass the initial screen), especially so with aa traditional degree like Law. The only true hurdle here is if the said Law undergraduate has the basic numeracy skills (GCSE level Maths is really all you need to do well in most roles, Quant roles aside - which Economics grads don't qualify for anyway), apart from that a Law degree holder and an Economics degree holder have very much similar chances of gaining a finance job.

    I'll end it with this: OP, choose the degree that you would rather be stuck doing for 3-4 years; forget about the semantics of 'grad prospects' - as people on TSR so oft call it - for now. They are both great degrees, the careers available to both have significant overlap and lastly, you will not be disadvantaged if you go for one over the other.
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    You could do law with economics at Warwick
    (Original post by 0123456543210)
    Hi.
    First of all, I really couldn't decide on whether I should do Law or Economics at undergraduate level, as I really loved both, but at the end I have decided to choose law. Now, however, I am on the brink of sending my application to several Law schools and I am having a second thought about economics, that just kills me. This uncertainty makes me want to skip applying at all.

    Please help, I really don't know what do do now?
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    Hey, thank you all for responding. You are awesome people.
    I think I may apply for law despite not so great job market for law grads at the moment. That is because when I wrote my PS for law, thoughts and ideas were flowing naturally. But with economics PS I have tried to start I could barely write an introduction and had nothing to fill my statement with, so I guess my interest lies within law. Maybe I'll regret it, but hopefully I wouldn't.
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    (Original post by 0123456543210)
    Hey, thank you all for responding. You are awesome people.
    I think I may apply for law despite not so great job market for law grads at the moment. That is because when I wrote my PS for law, thoughts and ideas were flowing naturally. But with economics PS I have tried to start I could barely write an introduction and had nothing to fill my statement with, so I guess my interest lies within law. Maybe I'll regret it, but hopefully I wouldn't.

    You have answered your own question in the best way possible; I'm pretty sure this is a point on which P'man and myself agree :-) No go get 'em!

    Where will you apply do you think?
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    (Original post by Stychomythia)
    You have answered your own question in the best way possible; I'm pretty sure this is a point on which P'man and myself agree :-) No go get 'em!

    Where will you apply do you think?
    I hope for York, Leeds, Newcastle, Exeter and Liverpool. Seems to quite be ambitious for my AS grades (AABB), but I'll just give it a go.
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    All good Russell-Group choices; are you sure that they're not too close together?
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Point 4 is BS. When I was at a large Magic Circle firm, a good 40-50% of the trainees spent time in HK, Paris, New York, Dubai and a bunch of other international cities. Some even did secondments at a different companies abroad. That said, I agree to an extent, for most non-commonwealth countries practising law can be quite challenging. Basicalky, aim for the large international companies and you'll be able to get opportunities to work abroad.

    Plus any jobs an econ grad applies for a law grad can get, with the exception of if said econ grad chooses to pursue a PhD in Econ then becomes a fully fledged economist.
    Would a lawyer get a higher salary in the UK or Dubai?
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    (Original post by 0123456543210)
    I hope for York, Leeds, Newcastle, Exeter and Liverpool. Seems to quite be ambitious for my AS grades (AABB), but I'll just give it a go.
    How did it go?
 
 
 
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