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How do you pronounce "Meme"? watch

  • View Poll Results: How do you pronounce "Meme"?
    "Memey"
    9.30%
    "Meeeeem"
    90.70%

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    (Original post by Multitalented me)
    I've always pronounced it as "Memey" but a mate told me it's supposed to be pronounces as "Meeeeem", I dunno it just doesn't sound the same to me haha! What about you???
    I pronounce it completely differently. I say: "mem-may"
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    (Original post by jeremy1988)
    Meme comes from Greek, not French. If it were a French loanword, you would have been correct. To be specific, it's based on part of a Greek word, but it was coined by a British biologist named Richard Dawkins, so it uses English phonetic conventions.

    Loanwords retaining the original spelling is part of why English pronunciation is a mess. Many other languages would have just localised a word like Jalapeno into Halapinyo or something. As things stand, you have to be able to identify a word's origin and know the phonetic conventions of the original language to be able to pronounce half the words in the dictionary properly. At the very least, you need a rudimentary ability to pronounce things in French and Spanish for the great majority of loanwords. Greek and Latin come up frequently as well, but because our Alphabet is Roman, that's not as much of a stretch.
    only can someone post this on TSR :facepalm: Get a life sonny - Go buy yourself a blow up doll or get a real gf or something.
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    An extract from Dawkin's 'The Selfish Gene':
    "We need a name for the new replicator, or a noun that conveys the idea of a unit of cultural transmission, or a unit of imitation. 'Mimeme' comes from a suitable Greek root, but I want a monosyllable that sounds a bit like 'gene'. I hope my classicist friends will forgive me if I abbreviate mimeme to meme. If it is any consolation, it could alternatively be thought of as being related to 'memory', or to the French word 'même'. It should be pronounced to rhyme with 'cream'."
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    I pronounce it as if it rhymes with theme.

    (Original post by rock_climber86)
    only can someone post this on TSR :facepalm: Get a life sonny - Go buy yourself a blow up doll or get a real gf or something.
    You'd never make it on English stack exchange.
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    I pronounce it as 'mem'

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    You pronounce it so it would rhyme with cream, so "meem"
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    meem
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    (Original post by jeremy1988)
    Meme comes from Greek, not French. If it were a French loanword, you would have been correct. To be specific, it's based on part of a Greek word, but it was coined by a British biologist named Richard Dawkins, so it uses English phonetic conventions.

    Loanwords retaining the original spelling is part of why English pronunciation is a mess. Many other languages would have just localised a word like Jalapeno into Halapinyo or something. As things stand, you have to be able to identify a word's origin and know the phonetic conventions of the original language to be able to pronounce half the words in the dictionary properly. At the very least, you need a rudimentary ability to pronounce things in French and Spanish for the great majority of loanwords. Greek and Latin come up frequently as well, but because our Alphabet is Roman, that's not as much of a stretch.
    And because we don't have the same letters in our alphabet, it makes it worse. Jalapeño as opposed to jalapeno.

    @OP
    The 'e' at the end of 'meme' means that you pronounce the first 'e' as how you'd say the letter when you recite the alphabet: 'ee', rendering the second 'e' silent.
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    (Original post by rock_climber86)
    only can someone post this on TSR :facepalm: Get a life sonny - Go buy yourself a blow up doll or get a real gf or something.
    :erm:

    What's wrong with knowing about etymology?
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    There's a structural irony attaching to the prescriptivism here "it should be pronounced to rhyme with cream".
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    Uhh I think 'me me' but I've never actually had to say the word.
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    Emem?
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    .م
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    i guess the pronunciation has ermm
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    م :bigsmile:
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    Meem
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    "mem - ay"

    To be honest "meem" sounds a bit weird to me.
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    (Original post by jeremy1988)
    Meme comes from Greek, not French. If it were a French loanword, you would have been correct. To be specific, it's based on part of a Greek word, but it was coined by a British biologist named Richard Dawkins, so it uses English phonetic conventions.

    Loanwords retaining the original spelling is part of why English pronunciation is a mess. Many other languages would have just localised a word like Jalapeno into Halapinyo or something. As things stand, you have to be able to identify a word's origin and know the phonetic conventions of the original language to be able to pronounce half the words in the dictionary properly. At the very least, you need a rudimentary ability to pronounce things in French and Spanish for the great majority of loanwords. Greek and Latin come up frequently as well, but because our Alphabet is Roman, that's not as much of a stretch.
    Good post. The whole thing stems from a desire by the British to appear sophisticated and cultured, an idea which likely held value in times past but not so much now :lol:
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    It rhymes with cream


    Anyone who says may-may is a jackass


    The word was coined by Dawkins to denote a set of behaviours or ideas which are passed on and either selected for or against in the same way gene variants are.
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    Meem
 
 
 
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