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Materialism is totally unfulfilling watch

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    I realised this years ago. I think the last thing I bought that I didn't need was a ukulele.
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    (Original post by Awesome Genius)
    As some of you may or may not know, last month I placed an order on a brand new BMW M4. I've saved up for weeks for this car and spent literally spent months drooling over it.

    Two weeks or so later, my arch rival, bought a 911. I was not happy but it's ok, he works 80 hours a week and can't enjoy it anyway.

    Since I have no parking where My flat is, I was going to park it at my parents house in North London. I told my parents that our neighbours would be well jealous since the car looks totally bad ass and really stands out on the driveway - so yeh, I was still happy.

    Now through some sick twist of fate, not one but TWO, white M4 coupes have appeared in reasonably close proximity to our house. Not only that but one of the houses already has a Ferrari 458 Italia.

    Basically materialism sucks. You just can't find happiness through buying things, not cars anyway.

    So if you're thinking, OMG I wish I had what X,Y and Z have, just remember, they're thinking the exact same thing about someone else.
    hmm... totally reasonable point of view. Material things bring a degree of genuine happiness. In order to feel this happiness it's very important to want something because it's going to fulfill some sort of need or pleasure for us. When we as humans buy something because the man in front has it and the man behind cant affordf it, it does us no good when we have it - because it was never innately for personal reasons. In other words we what we really desired was someone elses popularity, smile and/or reputation.

    I think to get happiness (a degree of it) one needs to know oneself fully and ask questiones such as: why do I want this? will it serve a purpose in MY life? do i think more of others because of it?

    I recently purchased myself a new pen, most people will never see it. Yet I desired it because I am aware of its good affect. I've seen people with the latest Iphone. Low and behold I wanted one. When I sat down I thought it's likely not going to make me happy. I never wanted it for myself, really I wanted it because of a social trend which gives an illusion.

    Honestly.
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    Materialistic goods make me so happy.
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    To find true contentment, one must give up the desire for material possessions. Unfortunately, it's quite hard to do that in our consumerist society where we are a) bombarded with adverts for things we don't need, and b) surrounded by people who we perceive as our competitors, and vice versa. Of course, one could argue that discontentment with the current state of affairs drives technological innovation; without some kind of competitive consumerism, we wouldn't have the machines and gadgets that make our lives easier. However I would still lean towards giving up the desire for material goods completely. The motivation to innovate and advance could then stem from a selfless desire to help others.
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    (Original post by Dima-Blackburn)
    To find true contentment, one must give up the desire for material possessions. Unfortunately, it's quite hard to do that in our consumerist society where we are a) bombarded with adverts for things we don't need, and b) surrounded by people who we perceive as our competitors, and vice versa. Of course, one could argue that discontentment with the current state of affairs drives technological innovation; without some kind of competitive consumerism, we wouldn't have the machines and gadgets that make our lives easier. However I would still lean towards giving up the desire for material goods completely. The motivation to innovate and advance could then stem from a selfless desire to help others.
    Wanna give up the laptop/computer/smartphone you're writing this nonsense from?
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    (Original post by JD1lla)
    Wanna give up the laptop/computer/smartphone you're writing this nonsense from?
    Red herring fallacy.
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    (Original post by Dima-Blackburn)
    Red herring fallacy.
    Hardly, it was a question. Would you feel more contempt if you gave up your laptop/smartphone/car etc?
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    (Original post by JD1lla)
    Hardly, it was a question. Would you feel more contempt if you gave up your laptop/smartphone/car etc?
    I'd feel more content if I gave up the desire for such things, yes.
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    (Original post by Dima-Blackburn)
    I'd feel more content if I gave up the desire for such things, yes.
    lol that's not the same thing.
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    (Original post by JD1lla)
    lol that's not the same thing.
    I never said it was. Do you think I'm arguing for monasticism? LOL
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    (Original post by Dima-Blackburn)
    I never said it was. Do you think I'm arguing for monasticism? LOL
    Wanting material goods isn't evil. Enjoying the finer things in life isn't evil. Nor is the desire.

    It's up to the individual to decide how it affects their life choices and how these objects define them.
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    (Original post by JD1lla)
    Wanting material goods isn't evil. Enjoying the finer things in life isn't evil. Nor is the desire.

    It's up to the individual to decide how it affects their life choices and how these objects define them.
    Sure, I wouldn't say it's "evil"; it would heavily depend on the reasons for wanting something. But it seems obvious that reducing one's desires would lead to a more permanent state of contentment.
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    (Original post by Dima-Blackburn)
    Sure, I wouldn't say it's "evil"; it would heavily depend on the reasons for wanting something. But it seems obvious that reducing one's desires would lead to a more permanent state of contentment.
    How? Content is a state which is purely subjective.

    I'm sure this guy is pretty content.

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/0...n_4602936.html
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    (Original post by JD1lla)
    How? Content is a state which is purely subjective.

    I'm sure this guy is pretty content.

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/0...n_4602936.html
    Is he though? He's a smoker. If he is truly content i.e. he is satisfied and his peace from within, why would he feel the need to smoke?
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    well I mean... you're not gonna drive that car to the grave so...
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    (Original post by Dima-Blackburn)
    Is he though? He's a smoker. If he is truly content i.e. he is satisfied and his peace from within, why would he feel the need to smoke?
    Who wouldn't want to smoke camel sh*t?
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    I'd be happy with an M4, don't care what other people have.
 
 
 
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