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How do you suceed when you are mentally ill? watch

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    Are you on any meds? If not, that is probably an avenue to explore.

    I dunno whether I count as a success story but I did complete my undergrad despite adverse circumstances concerning my mental health. How I "succeeded" was largely due to luck, but also by creating a big support network that I could tap into and complying with medical professionals as best as I could. So I'd recommend those two things.

    As has been said, once you've got a firm diagnosis and some meds/therapy lined up, the next step is to approach your uni's disability office :yes:

    Good luck
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    (Original post by Eggs20)
    That sucks.

    Do you take drugs for it?
    nah I have a friend that does though thats how I found out about it. I took some of his as well and it helped.
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    (Original post by Airmed)
    Have you been diagnosed with any mental health issues? If not, to speak to your GP and see what's wrong.
    No I haven't.

    But I do know I have developed mental illness over the past few years and it does seem to be getting very bad.
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    (Original post by SmallTownGirl)
    I redefined success. I'm being successful now because I'm eating breakfast. It may be crisps but it counts.
    this. sometimes getting out of bed and having a shower is a success for me
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    (Original post by Eggs20)
    Do you care what the rest of society thinks?
    I try not to. But people seem to think they can tell you that you're a lazy failure whether you ask their opinion or not...
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    (Original post by The_Lonely_Goatherd)
    Are you on any meds? If not, that is probably an avenue to explore.

    I dunno whether I count as a success story but I did complete my undergrad despite adverse circumstances concerning my mental health. How I "succeeded" was largely due to luck, but also by creating a big support network that I could tap into and complying with medical professionals as best as I could. So I'd recommend those two things.

    As has been said, once you've got a firm diagnosis and some meds/therapy lined up, the next step is to approach your uni's disability office :yes:

    Good luck
    No I am not on any meds. I have read online that some anti-depressants make you worse and can make people have severe suicidal thoughts so I am worried about taking them.
    Well done on succeeding on your course despite your mental health. It takes a strong minded individual to still be able to carry on and succeed despite their mental state. I am sure it was more to do with luck- medical professionals can only help to an extent and most of the work is done by you and your mind. I commend you for that.

    I have been to my ini's disability office before and I'm worried about having to go back again lol .
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    (Original post by ChickenMadness)
    nah I have a friend that does though thats how I found out about it. I took some of his as well and it helped.
    What drug was it?
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    (Original post by Eggs20)
    What drug was it?
    can't remember atm but you only get it if you're prescribed it. It's specifically for people with ADD.
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    (Original post by Odd socks)
    this. sometimes getting out of bed and having a shower is a success for me
    That state of mind is so tough to deal with.

    Are you seeing a counsellor?
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    (Original post by SmallTownGirl)
    I redefined success. I'm being successful now because I'm eating breakfast. It may be crisps but it counts.
    I second this, great example, lol.

    You yourself are defining success so, don't be too heavy on yourself otherwise you'll really put yourself off getting stuff done.

    Mental illness gets in the way a lot, no doubt about that, it's troublesome. But it might possibly help; If you think of the idea that emotions will always be a part of you. No matter where you are, where you go, what you have or don't have, you'll always have your lows. So there's no point trying to get rid of them, just let them flow through you, acknowledge they are there, but don't get anxious about them. It's what you are, no shame in that. It just gets in the way if you worry about how you're spending too much time on them and then not working, haha. But why worry about something that'll always be there, right?

    There's nothing wrong with being emotionally low. I think after accepting it's inevitable, it might be useful to shape your mindset so you're like;

    1.) Okay, I feel pretty low at the moment because of (insert reason). I can't change this reason so let me change my own perspective on it.
    2.) I accept that because my mind is subject to feeling emotions, it's normal
    3.) But I also acknowledge that emotions are like a constant flow of water. Sometimes its going to be like tidal waves for bit. Your emotions keep changing.
    4.) In the end, regardless of my emotions, there's almost always going to be things that I need to get done, for the benefit of the overall picture that I want to paint of my life. So even though I may feel like crap, I'm gonna sit down and carry on writing out these que cards.

    Or eat that packet of crisp for breakfast cause I'm badass.

    It may sound easier said than done, but its how i've handled my own mindset. Different things work for different people so there's not a definite answer

    Hope I could help.
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    See your GP.
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    (Original post by SmallTownGirl)
    I try not to. But people seem to think they can tell you that you're a lazy failure whether you ask their opinion or not...
    Some people can be really cruel.

    The only way to not be affected by a persons words is obviously to not care what they think.
    But its human nature to get annoyed with someone that you feel is speaking bad about you.
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    (Original post by Eggs20)
    Some people can be really cruel.

    The only way to not be affected by a persons words is obviously to not care what they think.
    But its human nature to get annoyed with someone that you feel is speaking bad about you.
    It's hard to not care when your mental illness means you're desperate for validation.
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    Why did you mention mental illness in the title?

    Lets not make this in to something it isn't. Think about what motivates you and what tends to trigger you to become distracted. You're a third year student so it may be worth reflecting on the past few years. I've found i, personally, have to monitor my behaviour quite carefully to solve these problems.
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    (Original post by Emily.97)
    Why did you mention mental illness in the title?

    Lets not make this in to something it isn't. Think about what motivates you and what tends to trigger you to become distracted. You're a third year student so it may be worth reflecting on the past few years. I've found i, personally, have to monitor my behaviour quite carefully to solve these problems.
    Do you have a diagnosed mental illness?
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    (Original post by Eggs20)
    No I am not on any meds. I have read online that some anti-depressants make you worse and can make people have severe suicidal thoughts so I am worried about taking them.
    Well done on succeeding on your course despite your mental health. It takes a strong minded individual to still be able to carry on and succeed despite their mental state. I am sure it was more to do with luck- medical professionals can only help to an extent and most of the work is done by you and your mind. I commend you for that.

    I have been to my ini's disability office before and I'm worried about having to go back again lol .
    I think having severe suicidal thoughts as a reaction to meds is a less common side effect, so I wouldn't let that put you off by itself! :nah: It's a scary prospect of taking meds at first, I understand that. But think of it this way - would you be so hesitant if you were a diabetic patient needing insulin? There are certain meds out there that can help us fix our bodies - therefore it's in our best interests to explore all avenues and take the meds if needed. If it does turn out that a particular med is making you suicidal, you can just slowly tail off that med and start another one - it's not like there's only one med out there

    Are your uni's disability office not nice or something?
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    (Original post by SmallTownGirl)
    Do you have a diagnosed mental illness?
    No. Before you start criticising me, i asked a valid question. I didnt make any judgements.
    Ive learnt about mental illness for a few years now, and if anything, i know that simply not being able to concentrate does not mean you are mentally ill.
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    (Original post by Emily.97)
    No. Before you start criticising me, i asked a valid question. I didnt make any judgements.
    Ive learnt about mental illness for a few years now, and if anything, i know that simply not being able to concentrate does not mean you are mentally ill.
    But it is a symptom of many common mental illnesses. Depression causes a lack of concentration and motivation in a lot of people. It can be extremely debilitating and cause you to struggle with things that you found easy before you got ill.
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    (Original post by SmallTownGirl)
    But it is a symptom of many common mental illnesses. Depression causes a lack of concentration and motivation in a lot of people. It can be extremely debilitating and cause you to struggle with things that you found easy before you got ill.
    Yes,of course.
    But we don't have the full picture, yet everyone is mentioning things like ADD, anxiety etc. All im saying is, lets not jump to conclusions and diagnose somebody when we aren't the experts.
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    (Original post by Emily.97)
    Yes,of course.
    But we don't have the full picture, yet everyone is mentioning things like ADD, anxiety etc. All im saying is, lets not jump to conclusions and diagnose somebody when we aren't the experts.
    Although we don't know OP and so don't know whether they have any other symptoms, people with a certain diagnosis are sometimes better than so called 'experts' at recognising those problems in others because know how they feel and react

    Also, I am the expert on how MY diagnoses affect me. It doesn't matter how many other people a specialist has seen and how much research they've done. I still know more about MY life and MY illnesses than them. But I cannot extend this all-encompassing knowledge to anyone else because I am not them.
 
 
 
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