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    (Original post by Hydeman)
    UCL or Bristol. Both courses are traditional lecture-based courses, as opposed to case-based learning (Cardiff) or problem-based learning (Exeter), which I suspect I'd like less because I like being able to do very little during the year and then working very hard in the run up to exams to avoid failing. :lol:



    There are quite a few disadvantages to the Oxford course from my point of view. To name a few: they've switched from dissection to prosection to teach anatomy; no clinical contact in the first three years; no guarantee that you'll actually be at Oxford after the first three years, in which case I'd probably end up at a London medical school anyway because they have special schemes for Oxford and Cambridge students who didn't make the cut for the clinical years at those universities; the ridiculously competitive environment. That last one is particularly important to me because I'm a fairly laid back person and I enjoy learning for its own sake rather than to one-up my peers all the time.



    UKCAT -- About three days of serious prep. Not a good idea if you want to do well on it.
    BMAT -- About five to six days. Again, really not enough if you want to do well on it, although everything except section 1 went fine on the day.



    Each university has their own timetable. UCL interviews from December until March, Bristol interviews from November until April, Exeter interviews between 1 December and 17 December, and Cardiff interviews from November until March. They can call you for interview at any time during the periods specified or not at all. Most medical schools lack the capacity to interview all their applicants so they usually have some kind of pre-interview selection criteria to decide who they'll interview.



    Are you seriously asking me this after I told you I've applied for medicine... :lol:

    A doctor, of course. Undecided on speciality but probably general practice or research if possible. Not big on talking to people all day unless it pays exceptionally well, you see.
    When doing a medicine course, are there any medicine courses that focus on specific things, or are all courses for medicine just general medicine?
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    (Original post by Anonymous1502)
    When i was asking which job you would want to have i was asking what would you like to specialise in, in medicine, sorry if my question was not clear.
    General practice or research. Possibly an anaesthetist job because I'm reliably informed that their job is '95 percent auto-pilot, 5 percent stress.'

    What is prosection?
    It's basically learning anatomy by either watching a qualified anatomist dissect a cadaver or part of a cadaver or observing cadaveric material that has been dissected beforehand. Courses that use dissection, on the other hand, make you learn anatomy by actually dissecting cadaveric material yourself, which I suppose isn't everybody's cup of tea but I think I'd enjoy it more than prosection.

    What type of learners do you think would be suited for the Oxford course?
    Learners for whom the lack of dissection isn't a deal-breaker and those who enjoy learning via the tutorial system. I recommend you read up on it if you or your sister are thinking of applying to Oxford or Cambridge. Basically it involves having small-group teaching sessions (sometimes one-to-one) at least once a week for which you produce a piece of work, an essay for instance, and then discuss that essay with your tutor and anybody else who's there.

    The tutors are often researchers who're at the forefront of their field and being able to sit down and chat with them is therefore quite a special thing, the equal of which is difficult to find at other universities.

    In Uni is it all lectures for UCL and Bristol, is there anything else?
    UCL and Bristol are primarily lecture-based but they both combine lectures with tutorials and small-group teaching ('small' in this sense means around ten people). I just think I'd like that a bit more than case- or problem-based learning because I'm lazy and not generally a good student.

    I like to think of it as the difference between A Levels and the International Baccalaureate -- the latter requires consistent hard work (like CBL/PBL) throughout the course, whereas the former, while requiring a minimum effort throughout, can be aced without having done much work during the year.

    I would appreciate if you could give me an insight about the course for medicine in imperial college, as I visited the uni before and I liked it a lot.
    Imperial's course is six years long with a compulsory intercalated year in the fourth year, so everyone who passes graduates with two degrees, an MBBS, which is a medical degree that qualifies you to be able to apply to foundation training posts, and a BSc from a list of medicine-related subjects, studied during the fourth year (i.e. it's the intercalated degree).

    For exceptionally able students, there is the opportunity to study for a PhD, eligibility for which is based on academic performance in previous years.

    Imperial's website is quite detailed about what the medicine course is like so I suggest you have a read: https://www.imperial.ac.uk/study/ug/...cine/medicine/
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    (Original post by Anonymous1502)
    When doing a medicine course, are there any medicine courses that focus on specific things, or are all courses for medicine just general medicine?
    I don't quite understand what you're asking here. All UK medicine courses will give you a basic grounding in everything -- specialisation comes later. There are other degrees you can do which focus on certain things like anatomy or biochemistry, if that's what you mean, but those aren't medical degrees, although they can be great for those hoping to apply to accelerated graduate entry medicine programmes. I don't recommend anybody who can get good grades in school to try for GEM though.
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    (Original post by Hydeman)
    I don't quite understand what you're asking here. All UK medicine courses will give you a basic grounding in everything -- specialisation comes later. There are other degrees you can do which focus on certain things like anatomy or biochemistry, if that's what you mean, but those aren't medical degrees, although they can be great for those hoping to apply to accelerated graduate entry medicine programmes. I don't recommend anybody who can get good grades in school to try for GEM though.
    Thank you for making that clear, as I was watching this thing on tv about something similar like this and i got confused. Thank you for clarifying this.
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    (Original post by Anonymous1502)
    Sorry to bother you but I would like to ask you how did you start learning Japanese? What resources did you use? Also do you have any tips? What books would you recommend for learning vocabulary and how did you learn kanji?
    You could start with "minna no nihongo / みんなの日本語”. It's the book that I used when I was still in elementary school. To be honest, I don't really remember much of how I learned Japanese. I lived in Japan for 5 years because my dad, who's a diplomat, was assigned there.

    If you are aiming to pass the N1 (JLPT 1), then I encourage you to visit their website. You can find different resources too http://www.jlpt.jp/e/reference/books.html
 
 
 
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