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Which processor watch

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    (Original post by Vikingninja)
    Could be slower due to files with age. I did a restore on my PC because of wtf disk usage and it was i7 4770.
    It's true. Just finished the windows 10 update, and clearing out a bunch of old programs, and BOOM it's much faster again
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    (Original post by spotify95)
    Thought so, but that's still pretty quick!

    Are they for desktops or laptops? As I haven't seen that many high clock speed laptop processors.
    Yeah, desktop.

    Definitely won't be seeing those speeds in a laptop for a while, there're no laptop cooling systems that'll cope with that sort of thermal wastage
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    (Original post by Asuna Yuuki)
    It's true. Just finished the windows 10 update, and clearing out a bunch of old programs, and BOOM it's much faster again
    I had 100% disk usage at times such as start up, now peaks at 30% but still getting stuff back on. It's alright since I'm applying to uni this week so updating whilst I do stuff on unis.
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    (Original post by Vikingninja)
    I had 100% disk usage at times such as start up, now peaks at 30% but still getting stuff back on. It's alright since I'm applying to uni this week so updating whilst I do stuff on unis.
    use an ssd and problem solved
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    Probably best to forget about the CPU speed stats - they are largely irrelevant when comparing different chips today. As another poster mentioned, performance is more closely related to the architecture of the CPU. Although clock speeds DO definitely correlate with performance if you're comparing the SAME chips with different speeds - a 3770k @ 4.5Ghz will be faster than a 3770k @ 3.5Ghz, for example.


    In terms of performance to suit your needs, I recommend definitely looking into an SSD. I don't know what kind of experience you have when t comes to switching hardware, but an SSD upgrade is one of the easier upgrades to make. If nothing else, it's definitely worth researching the difference and finding out if it might be for you. Personally I will recommend an SSD for anyone because of the incredible drop in wait times when booting/loading files.

    Another thing to look out for is the amount of RAM your laptop/computer has. Often when people complain about their computer "running slowly", it's because they're maxing out their RAM, which starves the CPU of data, reducing performance DRASTICALLY. This is particularly relevant when looking at laptops as they often ship with >4GB, which is not really enough for a modern user. Right now, for instance, I have open Chrome (with about 20 tabs), PowerPoint, Origin, and Windows Media Player - this is using 6GB of RAM, and my CPU is at around 20%. If I keep popping Chrome tabs, and all of my 8GB of RAM is filled, my CPU will leap to 100%, get very hot, and be unable to process much of anything.

    You can have the best processor in the world - if you don't have the RAM to match, it'll be CRIPPLED.

    As for your specific CPU question, my personal experience with processors is that you'd be best off going with a dual core i3 with hyper-threading, if you can find one within your budget. But honestly, anything Intel from the last few years will be just fine for your needs, as long as you have appropriate RAM for it.

    Hope that helps! If you have any questions, don't hesitate to quote me and I'll get back to you ASAP!
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    How did the laptop break? If it's an HDD crash you could just replace with a SSD for next to nothing, just reinstall Windows or whatever OS you like best.
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    (Original post by Calpurnia)
    Probably best to forget about the CPU speed stats - they are largely irrelevant when comparing different chips today. As another poster mentioned, performance is more closely related to the architecture of the CPU. Although clock speeds DO definitely correlate with performance if you're comparing the SAME chips with different speeds - a 3770k @ 4.5Ghz will be faster than a 3770k @ 3.5Ghz, for example.


    In terms of performance to suit your needs, I recommend definitely looking into an SSD. I don't know what kind of experience you have when t comes to switching hardware, but an SSD upgrade is one of the easier upgrades to make. If nothing else, it's definitely worth researching the difference and finding out if it might be for you. Personally I will recommend an SSD for anyone because of the incredible drop in wait times when booting/loading files.

    Another thing to look out for is the amount of RAM your laptop/computer has. Often when people complain about their computer "running slowly", it's because they're maxing out their RAM, which starves the CPU of data, reducing performance DRASTICALLY. This is particularly relevant when looking at laptops as they often ship with >4GB, which is not really enough for a modern user. Right now, for instance, I have open Chrome (with about 20 tabs), PowerPoint, Origin, and Windows Media Player - this is using 6GB of RAM, and my CPU is at around 20%. If I keep popping Chrome tabs, and all of my 8GB of RAM is filled, my CPU will leap to 100%, get very hot, and be unable to process much of anything.

    You can have the best processor in the world - if you don't have the RAM to match, it'll be CRIPPLED.

    As for your specific CPU question, my personal experience with processors is that you'd be best off going with a dual core i3 with hyper-threading, if you can find one within your budget. But honestly, anything Intel from the last few years will be just fine for your needs, as long as you have appropriate RAM for it.

    Hope that helps! If you have any questions, don't hesitate to quote me and I'll get back to you ASAP!
    I do agree with what you are saying about RAM playing an important part in the speed of a laptop - however, processor speed is also important.

    Example both my laptop and my parents laptop have 6GB of RAM. One (mine) has a i5 at 2.67 GHz, one (my parents) has an AMD-E at 1.7GHz. One is noticeably faster than the other.

    I haven't had any experience with an SSD - namely because (a) both of our laptops didn't have an SSD installed, (b) SSDs are quite expensive, and (c) we'd be losing storage capabilities (i.e. going down to 256GB instead of the existing 500GB or 750GB HDD.
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    (Original post by spotify95)
    Example both my laptop and my parents laptop have 6GB of RAM. One (mine) has a i5 at 2.67 GHz, one (my parents) has an AMD-E at 1.7GHz. One is noticeably faster than the other.
    That's not necessarily because of the higher clock speed, it's most likely because AMD's mobile CPUs are (for the most part) crap when compared to the Core I series. If you put your 2.6GHz i5 up against a 1.3GHz i5 like the ones found in some ultrabooks, odds are you wouldn't notice a big difference doing day to day tasks.
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    (Original post by dis0rder)
    my laptop basically just broke down the other day and i really need one, i can only afford the cheaper ones because i'm almost in my overdraft but i dont know if its worth buying a laptop with a Celeron processor because apparently theyre slow? i cant afford an i3/i5 as i said. would celeron be alright for stuff like spotify, office word/excel, films etc or is it not worth spending money on?
    why don't you build your own computer? What is your budget?
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    (Original post by Calpurnia)
    Probably best to forget about the CPU speed stats - they are largely irrelevant when comparing different chips today. As another poster mentioned, performance is more closely related to the architecture of the CPU. Although clock speeds DO definitely correlate with performance if you're comparing the SAME chips with different speeds - a 3770k @ 4.5Ghz will be faster than a 3770k @ 3.5Ghz, for example.
    That is mostly true, but architecture doesn't necessarily mean better performance. You will have to elaborate on this, unless you mean a generation of different chips such as the Ivy Bridge, then Maxwell.

    Another thing to look out for is the amount of RAM your laptop/computer has. Often when people complain about their computer "running slowly", it's because they're maxing out their RAM, which starves the CPU of data, reducing performance DRASTICALLY. This is particularly relevant when looking at laptops as they often ship with >4GB, which is not really enough for a modern user. Right now, for instance, I have open Chrome (with about 20 tabs), PowerPoint, Origin, and Windows Media Player - this is using 6GB of RAM, and my CPU is at around 20%. If I keep popping Chrome tabs, and all of my 8GB of RAM is filled, my CPU will leap to 100%, get very hot, and be unable to process much of anything.
    Its surprisingly difficult to max out RAM because Windows does a fantastic job at optimising the performance to the hardware platform.
    It doesn't starve the CPU of data at all, that doesn't even make sense.
    If RAM is maxed out, the pagefile is put under a very high load by using the disk to store memory.
    Once that is maxed out, then usually one of two things will happen.
    The applications hogging memory, such as chrome will crash.
    Or Windows will crash if it is non paged memory that is being leaked.

    You can have the best processor in the world - if you don't have the RAM to match, it'll be CRIPPLED.
    Not quite.
    When your computer has less RAM, Windows goes about changing the way it uses memory to optimise the OS better.
    I cannot recall exactly what it does, I cannot find the information on it.
 
 
 
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