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Can anyone give me a better word to use? watch

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    (Original post by Mr JB)
    Write it in Jamaican for extra bonus points.

    Let me tell you a likkle story rudeboy, dis be a story bout dem bois who share dem similar tings brudda, even doe dem tings be centuries 'part. Mi haffi tell you all bout it.
    :clap2:

    As much as I think that is absolutely amazing, my english teacher no doubt would roll it up and beat me with it, taking into consideration it's also almost a week late. whoops.
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    (Original post by TheonlyMrsHolmes)
    Sure, why not?!
    (Original post by Illiberal Liberal)
    Yes.
    XD Eeek, I didn't think you'd actually provide me with some amazing green goodness. :nutcase:

    Thank youuUUuu- I love you both like bread. <3

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    (Original post by Anon_98)
    XD Eeek, I didn't think you'd actually provide me with some amazing green goodness. :nutcase:

    Thank youuUUuu- I love you both like bread. <3

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    So much green goodness all over my thread
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    Was also gonna suggest despite, albeit doesn't really work. Albeit is indeed an alternative for "although" or "even though" but it's in a slightly different context, e.g. "It's a good film, albeit a little long". Almost always a bit paradoxical in context.
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    (Original post by Mr JB)
    Write it in Jamaican for extra bonus points.

    Let me tell you a likkle story rudeboy, dis be a story bout dem bois who share dem similar tings brudda, even doe dem tings be centuries 'part. Mi haffi tell you all bout it.
    Hahahaha man I think I love you hahaha I love it
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    (Original post by WoodyMKC)
    Was also gonna suggest despite, albeit doesn't really work. Albeit is indeed an alternative for "although" or "even though" but it's in a slightly different context, e.g. "It's a good film, albeit a little long". Almost always a bit paradoxical in context.
    I agree. Despite was better.
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    As a lot of people have said despite or albeit is the best
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    ThesaurusFrom Wikipedia, the free encyclopediaThis article is about thesauri for general or literary applications. For thesauri designed for information retrieval, see Thesaurus (information retrieval). For the Clare Fischer album, see Thesaurus (album).
    In general usage, a thesaurus is a reference work that lists words grouped together according to similarity of meaning (containingsynonyms and sometimes antonyms), in contrast to a dictionary, which provides definitions for words, and generally lists them in alphabetical order. The main purpose of such reference works is to help the user "to find the word, or words, by which [an] idea may be most fitly and aptly expressed" – to quote Peter Mark Roget, architect of the best known thesaurus in the English language.[1]Although including synonyms, a thesaurus should not be taken as a complete list of all the synonyms for a particular word. The entries are also designed for drawing distinctions between similar words and assisting in choosing exactly the right word. Unlike a dictionary, a thesaurus entry does not give the definition of words.In library science and information science thesauri have been widely used to specify domain models. Recently, thesauri have been implements with SKOS.
    Contents [hide]
    Etymology[edit]The word "thesaurus" is derived from 16th-century New Latin, in turn from Latin thēsaurus, which is the Latinisation of the Greek θησαυρός (thēsauros), "treasure, treasury, storehouse".[2] The word thēsauros is of uncertain etymology. Douglas Harper derives it from the root of the Greek verb τιθέναι tithenai, "to put, to place."[2] Robert Beekesrejected an Indo-European derivation and suggested a Pre-Greek suffix *-arwo-.[3]From the 16th to the 19th centuries, the term "thesaurus" might be applied to any dictionary or encylopedia; as in the Thesaurus linguae latinae(1532), and the Thesaurus linguae graecae(1572). The meaning "collection of words arranged according to sense" is first attested in 1852 in Roget's title and thesaurer is attested in Middle English for "treasurer".[2]History[edit]
    Peter Mark Roget, author of the first thesaurus.
    In antiquity, Philo of Byblos authored the first text that could now be called a thesaurus. In Sanskrit, the Amarakosha is a thesaurus in verse form, written in the 4th century.The first modern thesaurus was Roget's Thesaurus, first compiled in 1805 by Peter Mark Roget, and published in 1852. Since its publication it has never been out of print and is still a widely used work across the English-speaking world.[4] Entries in Roget's Thesaurus are listed conceptually rather than alphabetically. Roget described his thesaurus in the foreword to the first edition:It is now nearly fifty years since I first projected a system of verbal classification similar to that on which the present work is founded. Conceiving that such a compilation might help to supply my own deficiencies, I had, in the year 1805, completed a classed catalogue of words on a small scale, but on the same principle, and nearly in the same form, as the Thesaurus now published.[5]List of thesauri[edit]See also[edit]References[edit]
    1. Jump up^ Roget, Peter. 1852. Thesaurus of English Language Words and Phrases
    2. ^ Jump up to:a b c "thesaurus". Online Etymology Dictionary.
    3. Jump up^ R. S. P. Beekes, Etymological Dictionary of Greek, Brill, 2009, p. 548.
    4. Jump up^ http://www.oxfordscholarship.com/vie...4729-chapter-1
    5. Jump up^ Lloyd 1982, p. xix[full citation needed]
    6. Jump up^ http://shesaurus.com
    External links[edit]
    • The dictionary definition of thesaurus at Wiktionary
    [hide]LexicographyTypes of reference worksTypes of dictionariesLexicographic projectsOtherCategories: Navigation menuInteractionToolsPrint/exportLanguagesEdit links
    • This page was last modified on 14 October 2015, at 19:35.
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    (Original post by TheonlyMrsHolmes)
    No that is dull.

    I used 'despite' and it made my sentence sound sexy.

    But rep for helping!
    You seem to be overthinking this. I wouldn't say however is dull at all. Something like "but", maybe.
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    (Original post by John55)
    ThesaurusFrom Wikipedia, the free encyclopediaThis article is about thesauri for general or literary applications. For thesauri designed for information retrieval, see Thesaurus (information retrieval). For the Clare Fischer album, see Thesaurus (album).
    In general usage, a thesaurus is a reference work that lists words grouped together according to similarity of meaning (containingsynonyms and sometimes antonyms), in contrast to a dictionary, which provides definitions for words, and generally lists them in alphabetical order. The main purpose of such reference works is to help the user "to find the word, or words, by which [an] idea may be most fitly and aptly expressed" – to quote Peter Mark Roget, architect of the best known thesaurus in the English language.[1]Although including synonyms, a thesaurus should not be taken as a complete list of all the synonyms for a particular word. The entries are also designed for drawing distinctions between similar words and assisting in choosing exactly the right word. Unlike a dictionary, a thesaurus entry does not give the definition of words.In library science and information science thesauri have been widely used to specify domain models. Recently, thesauri have been implements with SKOS.
    Contents [hide]
    Etymology[edit]The word "thesaurus" is derived from 16th-century New Latin, in turn from Latin thēsaurus, which is the Latinisation of the Greek θησαυρός (thēsauros), "treasure, treasury, storehouse".[2] The word thēsauros is of uncertain etymology. Douglas Harper derives it from the root of the Greek verb τιθέναι tithenai, "to put, to place."[2] Robert Beekesrejected an Indo-European derivation and suggested a Pre-Greek suffix *-arwo-.[3]From the 16th to the 19th centuries, the term "thesaurus" might be applied to any dictionary or encylopedia; as in the Thesaurus linguae latinae(1532), and the Thesaurus linguae graecae(1572). The meaning "collection of words arranged according to sense" is first attested in 1852 in Roget's title and thesaurer is attested in Middle English for "treasurer".[2]History[edit]
    Peter Mark Roget, author of the first thesaurus.
    In antiquity, Philo of Byblos authored the first text that could now be called a thesaurus. In Sanskrit, the Amarakosha is a thesaurus in verse form, written in the 4th century.The first modern thesaurus was Roget's Thesaurus, first compiled in 1805 by Peter Mark Roget, and published in 1852. Since its publication it has never been out of print and is still a widely used work across the English-speaking world.[4] Entries in Roget's Thesaurus are listed conceptually rather than alphabetically. Roget described his thesaurus in the foreword to the first edition:It is now nearly fifty years since I first projected a system of verbal classification similar to that on which the present work is founded. Conceiving that such a compilation might help to supply my own deficiencies, I had, in the year 1805, completed a classed catalogue of words on a small scale, but on the same principle, and nearly in the same form, as the Thesaurus now published.[5]List of thesauri[edit]See also[edit]References[edit]
    1. Jump up^ Roget, Peter. 1852. Thesaurus of English Language Words and Phrases
    2. ^ Jump up to:a b c "thesaurus". Online Etymology Dictionary.
    3. Jump up^ R. S. P. Beekes, Etymological Dictionary of Greek, Brill, 2009, p. 548.
    4. Jump up^ http://www.oxfordscholarship.com/vie...4729-chapter-1
    5. Jump up^ Lloyd 1982, p. xix[full citation needed]
    6. Jump up^ http://shesaurus.com
    External links[edit]
    • The dictionary definition of thesaurus at Wiktionary
    [hide]LexicographyTypes of reference worksTypes of dictionariesLexicographic projectsOtherCategories: Navigation menuInteractionToolsPrint/exportLanguagesEdit links
    • This page was last modified on 14 October 2015, at 19:35.
    You didn't have to copy paste the whole wikipedia page did you?!
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    (Original post by m3m)
    You didn't have to copy paste the whole wikipedia page did you?!
    XD You totally shouldn't have quoted it all either¡! *scrolls down for eternity* :eek4:

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    (Original post by John55)
    ThesaurusFrom Wikipedia, the free encyclopediaThis article is about thesauri for general or literary applications. For thesauri designed for information retrieval, see Thesaurus (information retrieval). For the Clare Fischer album, see Thesaurus (album).
    In general usage, a thesaurus is a reference work that lists words grouped together according to similarity of meaning (containingsynonyms and sometimes antonyms), in contrast to a dictionary, which provides definitions for words, and generally lists them in alphabetical order. The main purpose of such reference works is to help the user "to find the word, or words, by which [an] idea may be most fitly and aptly expressed" – to quote Peter Mark Roget, architect of the best known thesaurus in the English language.[1]Although including synonyms, a thesaurus should not be taken as a complete list of all the synonyms for a particular word. The entries are also designed for drawing distinctions between similar words and assisting in choosing exactly the right word. Unlike a dictionary, a thesaurus entry does not give the definition of words.In library science and information science thesauri have been widely used to specify domain models. Recently, thesauri have been implements with SKOS.
    Contents [hide]
    Etymology[edit]The word "thesaurus" is derived from 16th-century New Latin, in turn from Latin thēsaurus, which is the Latinisation of the Greek θησαυρός (thēsauros), "treasure, treasury, storehouse".[2] The word thēsauros is of uncertain etymology. Douglas Harper derives it from the root of the Greek verb τιθέναι tithenai, "to put, to place."[2] Robert Beekesrejected an Indo-European derivation and suggested a Pre-Greek suffix *-arwo-.[3]From the 16th to the 19th centuries, the term "thesaurus" might be applied to any dictionary or encylopedia; as in the Thesaurus linguae latinae(1532), and the Thesaurus linguae graecae(1572). The meaning "collection of words arranged according to sense" is first attested in 1852 in Roget's title and thesaurer is attested in Middle English for "treasurer".[2]History[edit]
    Peter Mark Roget, author of the first thesaurus.
    In antiquity, Philo of Byblos authored the first text that could now be called a thesaurus. In Sanskrit, the Amarakosha is a thesaurus in verse form, written in the 4th century.The first modern thesaurus was Roget's Thesaurus, first compiled in 1805 by Peter Mark Roget, and published in 1852. Since its publication it has never been out of print and is still a widely used work across the English-speaking world.[4] Entries in Roget's Thesaurus are listed conceptually rather than alphabetically. Roget described his thesaurus in the foreword to the first edition:It is now nearly fifty years since I first projected a system of verbal classification similar to that on which the present work is founded. Conceiving that such a compilation might help to supply my own deficiencies, I had, in the year 1805, completed a classed catalogue of words on a small scale, but on the same principle, and nearly in the same form, as the Thesaurus now published.[5]List of thesauri[edit]See also[edit]References[edit]
    1. Jump up^ Roget, Peter. 1852. Thesaurus of English Language Words and Phrases
    2. ^ Jump up to:a b c "thesaurus". Online Etymology Dictionary.
    3. Jump up^ R. S. P. Beekes, Etymological Dictionary of Greek, Brill, 2009, p. 548.
    4. Jump up^ http://www.oxfordscholarship.com/vie...4729-chapter-1
    5. Jump up^ Lloyd 1982, p. xix[full citation needed]
    6. Jump up^ http://shesaurus.com
    External links[edit]
    • The dictionary definition of thesaurus at Wiktionary
    [hide]LexicographyTypes of reference worksTypes of dictionariesLexicographic projectsOtherCategories: Navigation menuInteractionToolsPrint/exportLanguagesEdit links
    • This page was last modified on 14 October 2015, at 19:35.
    Holy ****
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    (Original post by Anon_98)
    XD You totally shouldn't have quoted it all either¡! *scrolls down for eternity* :eek4:

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    Haha, true. But i didn't know how else to address him/her!

    Edit: someone else has qouted them now. Ffs :rofl:
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    (Original post by John55)
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    A thesaurus is great and all, but it doesn't give context. Then you end up using words like albeit that don't really work in the OP's sentence.
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    I would suggest despite
 
 
 
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