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Do I have a bad/girly taste in music? watch

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    (Original post by icantfeelmyface)
    Are you female? (Sorry I can't see the symbol on mobile)
    The only really girly stuff there may be 1D and Bieber, but the rest are great...

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    Nah I'm male, but I enjoy all types of music. And i'm not going to not listen to an artist just because he/she is 'unpopular' or 'not cool'.

    Like Baby might suck, and Bieber might be a douche, but if he puts out a good song, i'm listening to it lol. Idc
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    (Original post by cole-slaw)
    I find it hard to understand how else you're going to relate to it on an intellectual or emotional level.

    Perhaps you could explain.
    This has actually got me thinking quite a bit. I'm not sure to what extent we find beauty in things based on rational thought and consideration as opposed to a more instinctive, irrational reaction.

    However, before I start writing a long essay on this topic, I'd just like to ask a couple of questions to clarify where you stand.

    Do you think that the only way music can directly discuss issues is through lyrics?
    If so, do you feel that instrumental music (e.g. classical) does not have the capacity to be "powerful"?
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    (Original post by studentro)
    This has actually got me thinking quite a bit. I'm not sure to what extent we find beauty in things based on rational thought and consideration as opposed to a more instinctive, irrational reaction.

    However, before I start writing a long essay on this topic, I'd just like to ask a couple of questions to clarify where you stand.

    Do you think that the only way music can directly discuss issues is through lyrics?
    If so, do you feel that instrumental music (e.g. classical) does not have the capacity to be "powerful"?
    Even classical music, often without lyrics, is overtly about something - generally something serious and meaningful.
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    (Original post by cole-slaw)
    Even classical music, often without lyrics, is overtly about something - generally something serious and meaningful.
    I'm not disputing the notion that all music, with lyrics or without, conveys meaning and a discussion of ideas. My particular issue is the description of this discussion as direct given that it heavily relies on subjective interpretation.

    Also consider this: all music necessarily reveals something about the society and culture in which it was created as well as the personalities/nature of the individuals who produced it. If these topics are viewed as significant (which I think is fair to do), does that not suggest that all music is powerful? If so, does that not render the idea of a powerful song as redundant?

    To approach it from a different angle, do you think there is any merit to the idea that we could have quite a base/primal response to music - is it possible to enjoy a song before you have even begun to contemplate any issues it brings up? Is it possible that the reasons we might give for liking a song, such as being interested in the concepts it deals with, are merely rationalisations?
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    (Original post by studentro)
    I'm not disputing the notion that all music, with lyrics or without, conveys meaning and a discussion of ideas. My particular issue is the description of this discussion as direct given that it heavily relies on subjective interpretation.

    Also consider this: all music necessarily reveals something about the society and culture in which it was created as well as the personalities/nature of the individuals who produced it. If these topics are viewed as significant (which I think is fair to do), does that not suggest that all music is powerful? If so, does that not render the idea of a powerful song as redundant?

    To approach it from a different angle, do you think there is any merit to the idea that we could have quite a base/primal response to music - is it possible to enjoy a song before you have even begun to contemplate any issues it brings up? Is it possible that the reasons we might give for liking a song, such as being interested in the concepts it deals with, are merely rationalisations?
    An interesting idea, but no. Much music is just meaningless crap that conveys no message whatsoever except of the deep and profound contempt of the artist for the intelligence of his audience.

    That's fine, just as not every table cloth can be fine art, not all songs are genuinely music.
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    (Original post by cole-slaw)
    An interesting idea, but no. Much music is just meaningless crap that conveys no message whatsoever except of the deep and profound contempt of the artist for the intelligence of his audience.
    I strongly disagree. Who we are as people is strongly influenced by the culture and society in which we live in - someone born today is likely to have a different personality, would create vastly different styles of music, etc. than if someone born five centuries ago, even if they somehow had exactly the same DNA. Thus anything anyone produces (be it art, music, academic papers, etc.) is, in essence, a small historical source that reveals something about the specific culture/society in which it was created.

    (Original post by cole-slaw)
    That's fine, just as not every table cloth can be fine art, not all songs are genuinely music.
    This view might root from my cynicism and untrained artistic mind, but isn't the distinction between fine art and rubbish quite often more down to who created it rather than the merits of the piece itself?
    To bring this back to music, if a shallow song that you considered to not be music was actually produced by a great classical composer, would you be more likely to look further into it, to try and find deeper meaning in it and then perhaps call it music?
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    Who cares? Why should you let other people influence what music you like 😂😂


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    (Original post by studentro)
    I strongly disagree. Who we are as people is strongly influenced by the culture and society in which we live in - someone born today is likely to have a different personality, would create vastly different styles of music, etc. than if someone born five centuries ago, even if they somehow had exactly the same DNA. Thus anything anyone produces (be it art, music, academic papers, etc.) is, in essence, a small historical source that reveals something about the specific culture/society in which it was created.
    So if I press down a note on the keyboard for 30 seconds and call it a name, what does that tell you about the culture and society I live in?


    This view might root from my cynicism and untrained artistic mind, but isn't the distinction between fine art and rubbish quite often more down to who created it rather than the merits of the piece itself?
    To bring this back to music, if a shallow song that you considered to not be music was actually produced by a great classical composer, would you be more likely to look further into it, to try and find deeper meaning in it and then perhaps call it music?
    Absolutely not.
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    (Original post by icantfeelmyface;[url="tel:60095227")
    60095227[/url]](This isn't specific for music section please don't move it)

    I am a 15 year old guy, here are some of the songs I listen to during exercise:
    Oblivion M83
    Queen of Peace
    Up (olly murs)
    Can't Feel my Face
    Counting Stars
    Clean Bandit
    Cheerleader

    Do I have a bad/girly taste in music????

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    I'm female and I've only listened to 2 of those... I haven't even heard of some of them. Lol

    Still, if that's what you like listening to then go ahead. Music isn't "just for girls" or "just for boys"; it's for everyone. That's what makes it awesome.
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    (Original post by cole-slaw)
    So if I press down a note on the keyboard for 30 seconds and call it a name, what does that tell you about the culture and society I live in?
    Saying that all music does reveal information is very different to saying that it is easy to determine exactly what information it reveals. It is similar with historical documents, accounts, statistics, figures, etc.; it is quite clear that they do reveal things, but it takes years of interpretation and debate before any consensus is arrived at as to what these things actually are.

    However, arguments could be that your song satirises the simplicity of much of modern music, revealing a dissatisfaction with the state of song-writing as it stands. Since it is very rare for opinions about quite general topics such as this to be held in complete isolation, it suggests that this may be quite a popular view.

    At a later date, it could help future generations form an understanding of the progression of music through history. For example, consider a hypothetical future in which most music was produced synthetically, with most physical instruments being phased out of use. Even your decision to play the song on a keyboard could be a useful and revealing fact. In many ways, the keyboard is quite a transitional instrument between traditional instruments and electronically produced music - it takes the general form of a piano and emulates the timbre of instruments, yet operates on a more synthetic level.

    Other aspects of the song which you have failed to mention would also be useful in analysing it - what is the actual name of the song? Do the dynamics vary or is it played at a constant volume? Does the song end abruptly and sharply or is there a fading out? etc. These pieces of information could reveal, among other things, more about your intent for creating the song or whether any particular music has influenced you.
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    (Original post by studentro)
    Saying that all music does reveal information is very different to saying that it is easy to determine exactly what information it reveals. It is similar with historical documents, accounts, statistics, figures, etc.; it is quite clear that they do reveal things, but it takes years of interpretation and debate before any consensus is arrived at as to what these things actually are.

    However, arguments could be that your song satirises the simplicity of much of modern music, revealing a dissatisfaction with the state of song-writing as it stands. Since it is very rare for opinions about quite general topics such as this to be held in complete isolation, it suggests that this may be quite a popular view.

    At a later date, it could help future generations form an understanding of the progression of music through history. For example, consider a hypothetical future in which most music was produced synthetically, with most physical instruments being phased out of use. Even your decision to play the song on a keyboard could be a useful and revealing fact. In many ways, the keyboard is quite a transitional instrument between traditional instruments and electronically produced music - it takes the general form of a piano and emulates the timbre of instruments, yet operates on a more synthetic level.

    Other aspects of the song which you have failed to mention would also be useful in analysing it - what is the actual name of the song? Do the dynamics vary or is it played at a constant volume? Does the song end abruptly and sharply or is there a fading out? etc. These pieces of information could reveal, among other things, more about your intent for creating the song or whether any particular music has influenced you.
    lol, I don't think you understand why people listen to music.
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    Why do 'bad' and 'girly' have to be synonymous?

    (Also seconding all the people who said that music doesn't have a gender)

    In answer to your question though, no harm at all in liking that music. If you like it go for it
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    Add some rap or rock or something into your mix and you'll be fine.
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    How is that 'girly'?
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    (Original post by cole-slaw)
    lol, I don't think you understand why people listen to music.
    Perhaps my point wasn't clear, so I'll summarise my argument.
    You stated that songs that discuss significant issues are powerful. I've demonstrated that all songs discuss significant issues on some level. So, if your statement is correct, all songs are powerful. If you disagree that all songs are powerful, then you agree that your initial statement is incorrect.

    I think it might be fair to say that no one really understands why they like certain types of music over others. Saying that you relate to it more; it invokes a deeper set of emotions or anything like that or other similar thing are perhaps some of the more common attempts at explaining this, but they are more elaborations rather than reasons. And I've yet to hear of any actual reason that attempts to explain the whole story that isn't quite deeply flawed.
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    (Original post by studentro)
    I was not expressing my own views on why people listen to music, I was simply exploring the implications of the reason you gave - that it discusses significant issues. As I've shown, all music does this, so the fact that there is music you dislike demonstrates that your reason is flawed.

    I think it might be fair to say that no one really understands why they like certain types of music over others. Saying that you relate to it more; it invokes a deeper set of emotions or anything like that is essentially an elaboration on saying "I like it more" rather than giving reasons. And I've yet to hear of any actual reason that attempts to explain the whole story that isn't quite deeply flawed.
    except, you haven't shown that at all. I'm amazed that you think you have.

    All you've shown is that by employing hermeneutic techniques in combination with a considerable amount of external evidence, various inferences may be made about the piece, the composer and their background. Whether or not these inferences are even remotely accurate or justifiable is another matter entirely.

    But you have done nothing whatsoever to show that all music discusses, addresses or contains any deliberate messages or references to significant issues.

    Thanks for playing, but you lost this one when you got confused what it was that you were trying to demonstrate.
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    (Original post by Tom Jickleson)
    Add some rap or rock or something into your mix and you'll be fine.
    Terrible advice
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    (Original post by Imperion)
    Terrible advice
    I'm not dissing OP's music choice at all. But there could be a little bit more aggression.
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    (Original post by Tom Jickleson)
    I'm not dissing OP's music choice at all. But there could be a little bit more aggression.
    I never said you were. Rap and rock are the only hard stuff? :laugh: I'm pretty sure harstyle bangs harder.
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    (Original post by Imperion)
    I never said you were. Rap and rock are the only hard stuff? :laugh: I'm pretty sure harstyle bangs harder.
    Sounds like overcompensation tbh
 
 
 
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