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    I've always had problems with speaking for a combination of reasons. Mostly I had a lot of hearing-related problems when I was little so took a long time learning to talk as I couldn't hear what people were saying. These were mostly sorted out by the time I was eight or nine but the talking problems stuck with me- I think I had speech therapy at some stage but don't remember much of it. Even now there are some sounds and words I struggle to pronounce, especially when I'm tired, and new people often struggle to understand me (even my own family on a particularly bad day). The other thing is I struggle a lot putting my thoughts into words and they often 'come out' in a weird order, I can't think on the spot very well so often either panic and go blank or say completely the wrong thing and opposite to what I actually mean. I was bullied a lot for these issues which made me reluctant to say anything at all, which ultimately probably made the problem worse.

    Now I'm a lot better, they haven't gone away by any stretch of the imagination but they're far better than I used to. I much prefer writing to speaking (one of the reasons I like talking to people on TSR so much) as I have more time to think about responses but I do talk a lot more and I think a lot more clearly than I used to, and am more aware of what may/may not be the right thing to say. A lot of my anxiety is around speaking and when I'm particularly tired or ill it all goes wrong but in general things have improved a lot


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    (Original post by furryface12)
    I've always had problems with speaking for a combination of reasons. Mostly I had a lot of hearing-related problems when I was little so took a long time learning to talk as I couldn't hear what people were saying. These were mostly sorted out by the time I was eight or nine but the talking problems stuck with me- I think I had speech therapy at some stage but don't remember much of it. Even now there are some sounds and words I struggle to pronounce, especially when I'm tired, and new people often struggle to understand me (even my own family on a particularly bad day). The other thing is I struggle a lot putting my thoughts into words and they often 'come out' in a weird order, I can't think on the spot very well so often either panic and go blank or say completely the wrong thing and opposite to what I actually mean. I was bullied a lot for these issues which made me reluctant to say anything at all, which ultimately probably made the problem worse.

    Now I'm a lot better, they haven't gone away by any stretch of the imagination but they're far better than I used to. I much prefer writing to speaking (one of the reasons I like talking to people on TSR so much) as I have more time to think about responses but I do talk a lot more and I think a lot more clearly than I used to, and am more aware of what may/may not be the right thing to say. A lot of my anxiety is around speaking and when I'm particularly tired or ill it all goes wrong but in general things have improved a lot


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    I was meaning to reply to this and it slipped my mind! Thank you for sharing this.Having met you, I wouldn't have realised everything you said in your post - it helps that you're so friendly too Do you speak to anyone about this often? Is there anything that helps? You said about writing things instead, which is great, anything else? Obviously don't answer if you don't want to
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    Do you have a communication difficulty or know someone who does?

    I've been diagnosed with High-functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder. I also have social phobia and generalised anxiety disorder. This combination makes communicating with people - face-to-face and, to a lesser extent, on the phone - quite challenging.

    What is your experience of this?

    I am not really certain how many of my problems are down to social phobia and anxiety, and how much they are down to ASD. I have trouble picking up on certain social cues, which other people pick up on probably without even thinking about it. I know that that is ASD related. I also feel discomfort in the presence of strangers, and, on a bad day, in the presence of people I know. I might feel the need to leave a room, and in a crowded environment, I can experience sensory overload. When different conversations are going on at the same time, I just feel lost.

    That is why I find it easier to communicate online. I can think about what I want to say. There is no sensory overload. I do not feel like people might judge me negatively as they might face-to-face, where they might see my discomfort and might pick up on any and all of my flaws. I'm simply judged on my character online.

    Of course, that still leaves me with the problem that I can't, and shouldn't, hide away from the world.

    What advice/helpful links could you give to others?

    If, like me, you struggle with social interaction, it can be helpful to take things one small step at a time. That is what I am attempting to do. Say hi to a neighbour. Make some small-talk with your local shop owner if you feel up to it. Don't push yourself too hard, or the anxiety might give you a negative experience that will then add to the existing anxiety problems. Let small, positive experiences build up to bigger ones.
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    Might aswell add my experience.
    I have a stutter, its not as bad as most peoples but it got better over time, Although I failed English at school because I would stutter so bad during presentations that the teacher would score me a 1/2 out of 10.
    I have been unemployed for the past year and a bit due due to lack of experience and bad english grade.
    BUT for people who have a stutter and are around my age(18) and at college or just unemployed. I would volunteer!
    I have been volunteering for the past 4 months and while it helps me get experience it also helps me build my confidence. My stutter made me a shy person but now I speak alot more, in interviews I reply in depth and ask them questions. Dealing with customers definitely helps you.
    Overall my stutter is nowhere near as bad as it was. I still have one some days and other days I am fine. But It has helped alot!

    UPDATE: I finally got a job! Honestly the volunteering gave me so much confidence I was able to push myself to go to it and it has paid off
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    (Original post by BurstingBubbles)
    I was meaning to reply to this and it slipped my mind! Thank you for sharing this.Having met you, I wouldn't have realised everything you said in your post - it helps that you're so friendly too Do you speak to anyone about this often? Is there anything that helps? You said about writing things instead, which is great, anything else? Obviously don't answer if you don't want to
    I'm curious what you might have guessed now I very rarely talk about this to people in person, more so on here which I guess is part of the feeling more comfortable online thing. In terms of what helps writing is probably the main one, but thinking about what I'm going to say beforehand can help or what I could ask someone. I've learnt that speaking a bit louder (which I often find difficult to judge) so I'm asked to repeat myself less helps avoid embarrassment, and watching people's reactions as best I can to see if they think I've said the wrong thing or if I can try to correct it. The other thing is just basic stuff making me less likely to panic and go blank, like always trying to be near a door so I can go out for a few minutes if it gets too much or taking a 'safe' item that can help with sensory overload a little bit. There's probably more relevant stuff but they're what I can think of right now!


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    (Original post by furryface12)
    I'm curious what you might have guessed now I very rarely talk about this to people in person, more so on here which I guess is part of the feeling more comfortable online thing. In terms of what helps writing is probably the main one, but thinking about what I'm going to say beforehand can help or what I could ask someone. I've learnt that speaking a bit louder (which I often find difficult to judge) so I'm asked to repeat myself less helps avoid embarrassment, and watching people's reactions as best I can to see if they think I've said the wrong thing or if I can try to correct it. The other thing is just basic stuff making me less likely to panic and go blank, like always trying to be near a door so I can go out for a few minutes if it gets too much or taking a 'safe' item that can help with sensory overload a little bit. There's probably more relevant stuff but they're what I can think of right now!


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    No, I mean I wouldn't have realised/noticed what you said about in your post about your communication They're really good methods, do you find they help a lot? It must be so difficult to have a communication, but I find people are a lot more understanding and 'accepting' than we often think. Have you found this, or found people can be difficult with this topic?
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    (Original post by BurstingBubbles)
    No, I mean I wouldn't have realised/noticed what you said about in your post about your communication They're really good methods, do you find they help a lot? It must be so difficult to have a communication, but I find people are a lot more understanding and 'accepting' than we often think. Have you found this, or found people can be difficult with this topic?
    Ohh okay sorry- that's anxiety for you yeah they can make a huge difference, more with how comfortable I feel in a situation but that means I'm calmer and more likely to be able to think and speak clearly too. I'd definitely agree with that, particularly if I say I can't hear people are normally really understanding (rather than just thinking I'm weird for answering a totally different question to the one they asked!), or asking them to make sure they have my attention before trying to speak to me. I should probably get better at telling people but I still tend to avoid it unless I absolutely have to.


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    Yeah, I'd add social anxiety to your list. I struggle with moderate/severe social anxiety and have ADHD, so keeping a conversation going, especially with someone i don't know very well is incredibly difficult and scary. I also have difficulty maintaining eye contact which is quite noticeable and upsetting for me sometimes.
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    I knew 2 sisters who both couldn't speak and were deaf and sometimes I wonder why it's always good people that have to suffer whereas bad people always get their way and rarely experience anything I did not speak much with those sisters but we used to go on the same bus to school, I went to small town school whereas they went to specialist school where majority of students had learning disabilities including one of my friends who had mental issues (I've suffered few times from his mental breakdown). The way I was communicating with those girls was by a sign language That was like 14 years ago, so at that time the sign language itself that we spoke by was kind of primitive and simple

    My cousin's son also had a communication difficulty but not sure what kind of. I know that he couldn't pronounce the words at all and would just make noises but now he's like 12-14 years old and can actually speak

    I think my mother's friend's son cannot speak due to having Down's syndrome too and I had a neighbour who's son also had Down's syndrome and instead of speaking would make noises.
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    (Original post by BurstingBubbles)
    [/URL], and it got us thinking about individuals who have communication difficulties all year round.

    Communication difficulties may include difficulties with speech, language, non-verbal communication, and social interaction. Sometimes communication difficulties are overlooked compared to physical difficulties, but they can affect people just as much. Acknowledging communication difficulties helps people get the support they need.


    As well as Stammering, other condtions with communication difficulties associated with them may include:
    ADHD
    Autism/ASD
    Dementia
    Dyslexia
    (Verbal) Dyspraxia
    Hearing Loss
    Learning Disabilities
    Selective Mutism
    Specific Language Impairment (SLI)
    Stroke
    Visual Impairment

    What other conditions can you think of to add to the list?

    Do you have a communication difficulty or know someone who does?

    What is your experience of this?

    What advice/helpful links could you give to others?

    If you have any questions about communication difficulties, please post them below or PM me. Additionally, check out the Giving Voice Campaign
    Muscular dystrophy can manifest in a speech impediment in me for instance I have a little trouble controlling the speed and often get young tied or have trouble saying some words but speech therapy has helped that a bit.
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    (Original post by BurstingBubbles)
    As am I

    Do you find quite a lot a lack of education or stigma around communication difficulties?
    As am I! Where do you study?

    I do not think speech, language and communication needs (SLCN) are different to other medical problems so far as education is concerned. People generally tend not to know very much about things unless they have personal experience of it themselves. However, I do think there is more stigma involved with SLCN relative to other conditions because lots of them do not have visible symptoms which are clearly linked to the disorder unlike, say, communication problems caused by a cleft palate or a stroke. Having said that, I think we are in a much better now than we were say, 20-30 years ago, when teachers thought people with SLCN were just slow or stupid and were quite oblivious to the longitudinal effects their negative attitudes have on people.
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    I've got ADHD, aspergers syndrome (high-functioning autism) and used to suffer from a stutter and selective mutism. The mutism and stutter both came from my autism, which is quite common for autistic people. When I was younger I couldn't manage social interaction at all, even things like playing were a mystery.

    It turns out that this all came/comes from my autism and ADHD. Most people only use the parts of the brain that are meant for processing information to think about things. But the parts of my brain that are meant to deal with social interaction and certain hormonal responses are instead used for processing information. I'm no biologist, but I guess autism causes neurons to link differently.

    Over many years of studying people's interactions I've been able to deduce an algorithm of sorts which predicts what will happen in social interactions. But like AI algorithms, it's far from perfect and I still miss a lot of social cues.

    Despite all of this I still wouldn't trade it for anything. Without my autism I wouldn't be me anymore. Yes, it has made many aspects of daily life very difficult for me, but its also given me a brain with a higher "clock speed." The strange wiring of my neurons has enabled me to see links and relationships between phenomena that most others cant, and both my ADHD and autism have given me an almost dangerous obsession with atoms, atomic structures and everything sub-atomic. I even met the love of my life, the hydrogen peroxide molecule, due to it.

    It's horrible having to face the difficulties caused by communication difficulties every day, but on the bright side, if you learn to live through it it makes you a much stronger person and much more determined to succeed than most other people.
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    (Original post by ForgetMe)

    I think my mother's friend's son cannot speak due to having Down's syndrome too and I had a neighbour who's son also had Down's syndrome and instead of speaking would make noises.
    A friend's son has Downs Syndrome and does not talk. The first two times I met him, his response was to stick his tongue out at me when I said hello.

    I have a friend whose son has something called 18q- syndrome. (you have two "arms" on each chromosome called p and q. He doesn't have q on #18) In his case, he's deaf, partially sighted and has learning disabilities. Partly because of being deaf, his speech is rather poor and delayed. He uses a simplified form of sign language to communicate.
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    (Original post by Kittiara)
    Do you have a communication difficulty or know someone who does?

    I've been diagnosed with High-functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder. I also have social phobia and generalised anxiety disorder. This combination makes communicating with people - face-to-face and, to a lesser extent, on the phone - quite challenging.

    What is your experience of this?



    That is why I find it easier to communicate online. I can think about what I want to say. There is no sensory overload. I do not feel like people might judge me negatively as they might face-to-face, where they might see my discomfort and might pick up on any and all of my flaws. I'm simply judged on my character online.

    Of course, that still leaves me with the problem that I can't, and shouldn't, hide away from the world.

    What advice/helpful links could you give to others?
    cool.


    Im just not the best socially....but can agree with the little steps think although often life doesnt let yeh do it in small steps.

    I think you need resilience too. youre gonna have negative experiences but aslong as you keep trying theres hope
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    (Original post by OU Student)
    This is a serious issue for me unfortuantely.

    I have a hearing impairment called Hyperacusis which means that my hearing is rather sensitive. This means that if there's more than one person talking, I can't always hear them clearly. More than one noise means it goes into one horrible loud noise. At which point, it's not that unusual for me to go non verbal, which is rather scary.

    I have Autism, which means I have problems with verbal and non-verbal communication. I have a lot of problems explaining what I mean and I have a lot of problems understanding what other people mean. You have to tell me what you really mean. You can't for example, use similies and methaphors on me. They might as well be a different language to me. In my head I know what I mean; but it doesn't always come out how I intended. It's not that unusual for me to receive a message from a friend of mine (who, before retiring, taught Communication at A level) with the words "I don't understand what you really mean". My lack of understanding of language was why I was forced to tell him in the first place that I had Autism, which he responded with "I am aware that you have problems communicating". It can sometimes take me a few minutes to realise what you really mean. So if I go quiet, I'm not being rude. I'm just trying to process what you've said to me.

    You, I think missed out visual impairment from your list. (and a "r" in the word stroke!)
    Wow ive never heard of anyone experiencing something like that, very good that youve managed to overcome that, i think your an inspiration to many people
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    (Original post by ikhan94)
    Wow ive never heard of anyone experiencing something like that, very good that youve managed to overcome that, i think your an inspiration to many people
    Thanks.

    One piece of advise I would give to friends and family of people with communication difficultes - please be patient - it really helps. Thanks.

    I sometimes had to warn friends of mine that if we went out, I may have to just walk out without warning. It's not the sort of thing where you can just say "I need to nip outside for 5 minutes", (like you can if you want to make a phone call or something) if I don't feel ok, I really have to go now. Not in 2 minutes time.
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    (Original post by OU Student)
    Thanks.

    One piece of advise I would give to friends and family of people with communication difficultes - please be patient - it really helps. Thanks.

    I sometimes had to warn friends of mine that if we went out, I may have to just walk out without warning. It's not the sort of thing where you can just say "I need to nip outside for 5 minutes", (like you can if you want to make a phone call or something) if I don't feel ok, I really have to go now. Not in 2 minutes time.
    Wow thats sad
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    Do those who experience communication difficulties find communicating online easier? Obviously this will depend if the difficulty if with spoken or written form - thoughts?
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    (Original post by BurstingBubbles)
    Do those who experience communication difficulties find communicating online easier? Obviously this will depend if the difficulty if with spoken or written form - thoughts?
    Spoken is always easier for me but online does give me time to fully construct what I want to say correctly
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    (Original post by claireestelle)
    Spoken is always easier for me but online does give me time to fully construct what I want to say correctly
    From my own experience, I agree with this. My spelling isn't the best (not clinically disordered, I just have a blank of how to spell some words sometimes), however I do talk quite quickly so written communication gives me more time to process what I'm saying
 
 
 
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