Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
x Turn on thread page Beta

UK man facing Saudi lashes plead with PM watch

Announcements
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Aj12)
    A valid argument if the law was followed by anyone. There was a story of a alcohol smuggler being arrested. His biggest client had been the Saudi Prince in charge of alcohol enforcement. The majority of the elites drink alcohol and brazenly break the laws over there. The whole system is a corrupt cesspit.
    I didn't say I was in support of Saudia arabia's human rights a uses but you would NEVER catch me carrying/buying or selling alcohol there or in the Arab Emirates or Qatar or Kuwait. Just a no no. I value my life
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Masih ad-Dajjal)
    In principle I agree it was stupid of the guy, but Saudi is corrupt as hell. Their royal family are massive drunks and I really could see people planting alcohol on people they didn't like, bribing police to have them convicted and all sorts of foul play.
    I agree but for safety reasons I would do such a thing. Still don't understand the no driving ban for women.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    It's like a person from Colorado where weed is legal coming over here, smoking a joint in their car and then wondering why they got arrested and charged.

    If you don't like Saudi rules, don't go to Saudi (probably in this guy's case to earn lots of money).

    No sympathy
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Saoirse:3)
    Whose laws are they? They aren't the people's laws. Nobody voted for them. The argument only applies if you think the ownership of an entire state by one family, who then make the rules and punishments for thousands or millions of others, is legitimate.
    I think it's sharia law so it was taken from their religion. Maybe they may have twisted it to suit their own needs,but as far as I know it's based on sharia law
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Josb)
    He didn't bribe the right person.
    Who knows
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Masih ad-Dajjal)
    In principle I agree it was stupid of the guy, but Saudi is corrupt as hell. Their royal family are massive drunks and I really could see people planting alcohol on people they didn't like, bribing police to have them convicted and all sorts of foul play.
    I've spent quite a bit of time in the middle east in some posh hotels where their elite like to come. It's pure hypocrisy they do everything - prostitutes, drugs, alcohol the lot!
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    Cameron won't do anything. The guy is a a little ***** to anyone who waves money, he wouldn't risk British business interests. Not that he is any worse than other PMs, Blair went full moral cowardice over the Saudis.
    Online

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by queen-bee)
    I think it's sharia law so it was taken from their religion. Maybe they may have twisted it to suit their own needs,but as far as I know it's based on sharia law
    Indeed it is - so why should they be able to impose their religion on others? What makes it their decision?
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Bill_Gates)
    I stayed for a night or two about a year ago, my uncle was looking to buy a property there. It was free flowing at the hotel.

    Here's a clip from travel website:
    - on the way home from the bottle shops in Ajman or Ras Al Khaimah, where you can buy alcohol without a licence.

    Ajman well known for it's parties etc. Lots of Russians about :P
    Lol I actually stayed in Sharjah and was told I couldn't have alcohol,same goes for Ajman. I don't know why! Maybe they're independent hotels? But I don't get it,they said I would have to go to Dubai which was a 20 mins drive,so, in that day I just decided to go to the Palm Atlantis aquarium and then went inside their restaurants and had a drink. Did you uncle get a tower?
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by KimKallstrom)
    It's like a person from Colorado where weed is legal coming over here, smoking a joint in their car and then wondering why they got arrested and charged.

    If you don't like Saudi rules, don't go to Saudi (probably in this guy's case to earn lots of money).

    No sympathy
    This really.

    I don't drink myself, but I don't agree with those laws and I certainly don't think the punishment is proportionate, but if you're going to make a choice to be there at least don't put yourself in a position where you will be causing trouble

    (Original post by Bill_Gates)
    I've spent quite a bit of time in the middle east in some posh hotels where their elite like to come. It's pure hypocrisy they do everything - prostitutes, drugs, alcohol the lot!

    In some parts I've heard they have unofficial gay bars where guys go to pick up young boys and the authorities just let it go, it's so weird how it's this harsh brutal far right country which is absolutely rotting and morally decayed at it's core.


    (Not saying homosexuality is immoral, just the hypocrisy and probable exploitation of people who are underage)
    Offline

    18
    (Original post by Illiberal Liberal)
    So if the UK had a law proscribing the stoning of anyone who engaged in sodomy (regardless of sexuality), would you defend the implementation of that law?

    Basically, do you think there is ever a case where your above defence of the law wouldn't apply? The answer to this, I hope, is yes.
    Pretty sure the stoning of those who engage in sodomy is already a crime...

    I agree with the rest of your post.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Saoirse:3)
    Indeed it is - so why should they be able to impose their religion on others? What makes it their decision?
    Majority of people living there are Muslims and it's a holy place where people go to hajj etc. I don't know. I myself am not a Muslim. But for safety reasons I wouldn't carry alcohol.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by queen-bee)
    Lol I actually stayed in Sharjah and was told I couldn't have alcohol,same goes for Ajman. I don't know why! Maybe they're independent hotels? But I don't get it,they said I would have to go to Dubai which was a 20 mins drive,so, in that day I just decided to go to the Palm Atlantis aquarium and then went inside their restaurants and had a drink. Did you uncle get a tower?
    Oh rite, yeah it's openly available at least 2-3 hotels there for sure. They even had it on the menu "alcoholic cocktails at 5-7" lol. But it was for guests only, so not openly available. But there was a shop selling alcohol across the road (Russian girl was saying dno if true or not).

    I can't blame Dubai for allowing alcohol otherwise tourists won't come. My uncle got a small flat which he was over the moon about at the time, he hasn't been since lol. Might go again for my Birthday!
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Illiberal Liberal)
    So if the UK had a law proscribing the stoning of anyone who engaged in sodomy (regardless of sexuality), would you defend the implementation of that law?

    Basically, do you think there is ever a case where your above defence of the law wouldn't apply? The answer to this, I hope, is yes.
    Did I say I agreed with what's happening to this guy? No I didn't. And did I say I was okay with sharia law? No. I was looking at it from my own viewpoint. I personally would not carry alcohol there. Simple as. Simply because I know I could get harmed or worse killed. I don't support brutal punishment of people because they choose to be gay or in this case carrying alcohol. Live and let live. But this is Saudia Arabia and we all know how strict it is
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Saoirse:3)
    Whose laws are they? They aren't the people's laws. Nobody voted for them. The argument only applies if you think the ownership of an entire state by one family, who then make the rules and punishments for thousands or millions of others, is legitimate.
    How are British laws any more legitimate?


    We have a Royal family who oppressed the poor of this country to get where they are before massacring, raping and robbing 1/4 of the world, we have an unelected house of lords passing laws and a electoral system which allows parliamentary majorities to be formed with only a minority of the votes.


    I think these Saudi laws I stupid, I think this is a pretty good country overall but I don't think your argument really holds up to much
    Online

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by queen-bee)
    Majority of people living there are Muslims and it's a holy place where people go to hajj etc. I don't know. I myself am not a Muslim. But for safety reasons I wouldn't carry alcohol.
    I wouldn't advocate risking doing it in practice, I'm just making a moral argument.
    (Original post by Masih ad-Dajjal)
    How are British laws any more legitimate?


    We have a Royal family who oppressed the poor of this country to get where they are before massacring, raping and robbing 1/4 of the world, we have an unelected house of lords passing laws and a electoral system which allows parliamentary majorities to be formed with only a minority of the votes.


    I think these Saudi laws I stupid, I think this is a pretty well country overall but I don't think your argument really holds up to much
    Oh I entirely agree, I am opposed to the monarchy, house of Lords and first past the post. It has some more legitimacy because it's not completely undemocratic, but on the whole I believe everyone should live and let live and that attempts to control other people's personal decisions are immoral, not resistance to such control.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by queen-bee)
    Did I say I agreed with what's happening to this guy? No I didn't. And did I say I was okay with sharia law? No. I was looking at it from my own viewpoint. I personally would not carry alcohol there. Simple as. Simply because I know I could get harmed or worse killed. I don't support brutal punishment of people because they choose to be gay or in this case carrying alcohol. Live and let live. But this is Saudia Arabia and we all know how strict it is
    Your rant, whilst interesting, does not engage with any of the questions I asked you.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Aj12)
    A valid argument if the law was followed by anyone. There was a story of a alcohol smuggler being arrested. His biggest client had been the Saudi Prince in charge of alcohol enforcement. The majority of the elites drink alcohol and brazenly break the laws over there. The whole system is a corrupt cesspit.
    Think I saw that on an episode of 'Banged up Abroad', Scottish guy right?

    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Bill_Gates)
    Oh rite, yeah it's openly available at least 2-3 hotels there for sure. They even had it on the menu "alcoholic cocktails at 5-7" lol. But it was for guests only, so not openly available. But there was a shop selling alcohol across the road (Russian girl was saying dno if true or not).

    I can't blame Dubai for allowing alcohol otherwise tourists won't come. My uncle got a small flat which he was over the moon about at the time, he hasn't been since lol. Might go again for my Birthday!
    Maybe they've changed the laws since then. Tbh Ajman and Sharjah are boring anyway,I only went because of the beaches. Way better than Dubai. Most families live there. The young,single people live in Dubai. There are hardly any Arabs that live in Dubai. And the women only leave the house with a mahram and wear nikhab from what I've seen but in Ajman/Sharjah people aren't so strict
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Saoirse:3)

    Oh I entirely agree, I am opposed to the monarchy, house of Lords and first past the post. It has some more legitimacy because it's not completely undemocratic, but on the whole I believe everyone should live and let live and that attempts to control other people's personal decisions are immoral, not resistance to such control.
    This country makes cannabis illegal and gives people life-ruining criminal records for possession of small amounts for personal use, it's stupid, unfair, immoral and probably doesn't even have backing of the public, but I would still say you're an idiot for blazing up in front of a police officer.
 
 
 
Poll
Do I go to The Streets tomorrow night?
Useful resources

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.