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Computer Science vs Economics vs Engineering watch

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    (Original post by Computer Geek)
    There isn't a shortage of programmers, there is a shortage of GOOD programmers. That is not a myth.
    Exactly, that's the point most people miss. If you are good, you will get a job.


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    Engineering = Computer Science > Economics
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    (Original post by Computer Geek)
    There isn't a shortage of programmers, there is a shortage of GOOD programmers. That is not a myth.
    Arguably there is a shortage of good everything. Always a shortage of people with the right skills in the right place at the right time. Problem seems to be employers dont want to help new graduates with on the job training.
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    (Original post by Oskar2000)
    Hello students

    I came over from Malta about 1.5 years ago, and in the past year or two, I have been struggling with what to study

    Some background :I was deciding between Computer Science, Economics and Engineering.
    I done A-level equivlents in Malta, in Pure Mathematics, English, Economics, Music and Chemistry.

    My average grade was a B. (I am not a smart person but I hope to improve.) So I have been given a choice to study Economics year 1, Computer Science with foundation or Engineering with foundation at an English university.

    Please note that if I do go for computer science or engineering this year I will have missed sixth weeks of study (my admissions took long) but the economics I have already covered in my previous year (overlap).

    I don't know if it's worth to pay extra money and time for an extra year in foundation for computer science or engineering, or just go into economics?

    I have no background in engineering or computer science, and I have to make decision by tomorrow. I feel confused about this all.
    Econ has pretty superb prospects if u go to a top uni... if you don't think you'll get into one just go for engineering... economics is superior btw

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    (Original post by icedark_knight)
    Econ has pretty superb prospects if u go to a top uni... if you don't think you'll get into one just go for engineering... economics is superior btw

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    You see that is what I thought from doing research - that economics is an intellectual subject, mathematical, demanding and rewarding, but some people on this thread seem to be saying the opposite/or that it is not as great compared to computer science etc?

    Thanks
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    (Original post by Raees_Sharif)
    Engineering = Computer Science > Economics
    Thank you for the input, so Engineering and Computer science are about equal? but how much easier is computer science than engineering? like if you could say in relative terms?
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    Don't study something just because a bunch of clueless teens on TSR said so. The delusion on this forum that STEM guarantees a high-paying job is unreal. In actuality, Economics graduates, on average, earn more than the other two subjects (at least at the top unis).

    It's about the person not the subject. Study what you enjoy.
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    (Original post by Oskar2000)
    hello , I saw your post and as you seem to be in the computer science field, what would you advise? How can i know if this field interests me?

    I will be not available to get loans and have saved up to pay it myself, so risking my savinngs,
    I'd choose computer science, but that's only because I know how to write programs, and the degree is mainly just going to be something I can use to gain an interview for a job. Computer Science isn't just code (at least at the top unis anyway), it's more about the design of software, the mathematics behind it all, why creating software is so employable. There is a lot of computer science graduates who don't even go into IT jobs when they graduate, this is because computer science allows you to be curious about code, without having to force yourself into it. What I mean by that is, you can become a programmer when you graduate, but there is nothing stopping you from becoming an actuary, a maths teacher, an investment banker, and that's because computer science is a numerate degree, not just a degree meant for programmers.
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    (Original post by Boy_wonder_95)
    Don't study something just because a bunch of clueless teens on TSR said so. The delusion on this forum that STEM guarantees a high-paying job is unreal. In actuality, Economics graduates, on average, earn more than the other two subjects (at least at the top unis).

    It's about the person not the subject. Study what you enjoy.
    I thank you for your input, I feel like all 3 subjects feel boring, but they all seem boring, but of the 3 I wouldnt know - engineering has some interesting parts but also a lot of boring topics. But I think your right with your comments. thanks again
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    (Original post by Computer Geek)
    I'd choose computer science, but that's only because I know how to write programs, and the degree is mainly just going to be something I can use to gain an interview for a job. Computer Science isn't just code (at least at the top unis anyway), it's more about the design of software, the mathematics behind it all, why creating software is so employable. There is a lot of computer science graduates who don't even go into IT jobs when they graduate, this is because computer science allows you to be curious about code, without having to force yourself into it. What I mean by that is, you can become a programmer when you graduate, but there is nothing stopping you from becoming an actuary, a maths teacher, an investment banker, and that's because computer science is a numerate degree, not just a degree meant for programmers.
    Ok, but is there a degree in this field (computer science/related) that avoids lots of coding/programming (which I find boring)? I seem to like parts of various degrees, but dont know how to combine it?
    Thanks
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    (Original post by Oskar2000)
    Ok, but is there a degree in this field (computer science/related) that avoids lots of coding/programming (which I find boring)? I seem to like parts of various degrees, but dont know how to combine it?
    Thanks
    Yes, like I said before, computer science isn't a lot of programming at all, my degree (at University of Warwick) only has 1 module (of 10) which is programming, the rest are maths, data structures, etc.

    It really depends what you like doing at the end of the day. Most universities let you pick a lot of your options.
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    (Original post by Oskar2000)
    I thank you for your input, I feel like all 3 subjects feel boring, but they all seem boring, but of the 3 I wouldnt know - engineering has some interesting parts but also a lot of boring topics. But I think your right with your comments. thanks again
    so is there not a subject you find even remotely interesting?
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    (Original post by Oskar2000)
    You see that is what I thought from doing research - that economics is an intellectual subject, mathematical, demanding and rewarding, but some people on this thread seem to be saying the opposite/or that it is not as great compared to computer science etc?

    Thanks
    lol... you realize you posted this on the engineering/technology forum? these guys are all biased... you'll get different answers if you post it in the economics forum... engineering is a pretty poor degree... not really that competitive and has average job prospects... I would advise economics, especially if you enjoy it...

    Economics is a pretty intellectual subject... Loads of maths and essays/constructing arguments/different viewpoints for everything... You have to understand theories really well... great deal of understanding... Go for it!
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    (Original post by Oskar2000)
    Hello students

    I came over from Malta about 1.5 years ago, and in the past year or two, I have been struggling with what to study

    Some background :I was deciding between Computer Science, Economics and Engineering.
    I done A-level equivlents in Malta, in Pure Mathematics, English, Economics, Music and Chemistry.

    My average grade was a B. (I am not a smart person but I hope to improve.) So I have been given a choice to study Economics year 1, Computer Science with foundation or Engineering with foundation at an English university.

    Please note that if I do go for computer science or engineering this year I will have missed sixth weeks of study (my admissions took long) but the economics I have already covered in my previous year (overlap).

    I don't know if it's worth to pay extra money and time for an extra year in foundation for computer science or engineering, or just go into economics?

    I have no background in engineering or computer science, and I have to make decision by tomorrow. I feel confused about this all.
    Choose Comp Sci or Engineering, as they are much more flexible (depends on your preference). Also, you can choose topics from Economics for your optional modules if you do either of them, and you can pretty much get into a job requiring knowledge of an Econ grad.

    I'd suggest doing more research in these fields.
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    (Original post by thecatwithnohat)
    There is only Iike 1 module in computer science that focuses on coding; the coding heavy course is Software Engineering.

    1 year is dedicated to (if you're not doing an MSc) a year in industry which will give you a boost ahead of other Graduates who haven't had work experience in the field.

    If you have no interest in computer science (it seems so) don't go for it. Don't think you should go for.engineering since you think "it's a waste of money". Perhaps go for economics since you seem to know what they're teaching and I'm hoping you enjoy it too.

    Comp Sci for the win forever and always though
    Hi, I was thinking of studying it however and really scared about the maths since I didn't do A level. Very very few are actually asking for it but will I still be able to do good without it? Also if you could just let me know more details about the degree that you know and what you think will be helpful- I will appreciate it
    Thanks
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    (Original post by Oskar2000)
    I see what you mean, and I said it is waste of money in that I have to do an extra year and same for computer science. I have no particular choice against any of the 3, but I have limited information of computer science and engineering . May I want to ask you, is computer science like logical thinking and problem solving, instead of lots of learning computer languages?

    How do i explain it? Well when I read about a certain problem, like how many ways can you arrange a sequence of numbers, I understand, but I hate learning new computer language like c++ or what it is called. I just seem to like solving problems I can think of in real life and in my mind.
    I don't understand why you will need to do a foundation year in Engineering / CompSci if you already do maths? Or are you not getting good enough grades to progress onto the actual course? Anyway, there are many Russel Group universities which allow you to take CompSci without any prior knowledge (of any languages, or A level maths - but you do still need to be ok at GCSE, mind).

    If you don't want to learn a new programming language, then Engineering could be for you. But like I said, I'm still unsure of why you'd need a foundation year if you're already studying maths.
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    (Original post by alexp98)
    Hi, I was thinking of studying it however and really scared about the maths since I didn't do A level. Very very few are actually asking for it but will I still be able to do good without it? Also if you could just let me know more details about the degree that you know and what you think will be helpful- I will appreciate it
    Thanks
    Hiya!! :hello:

    Well .. I was thinking of studying CompSci but then opted for Software Engineering instead because I much prefer the programming side of it and being able to apply my knowledge more than just learn the theory and whatnot. Basically, I'll be learning to apply the theory more often than learning about the theory.

    I guess in a typical CompSci degree you'll do things like algorithms, software development etc. and I guess your maths skills don't have to be THAT on point but you'll probably need to have some grounding since everything won't be explained from square 1 (unless you take a foundation year).

    In terms of what a specific course covers, you'll have to check your university choice's website because sometimes the modules vary. Also look at how much they weigh out coursework and exams, because you may have a preference for one or the other.
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    (Original post by thecatwithnohat)
    Hiya!! :hello:

    Well .. I was thinking of studying CompSci but then opted for Software Engineering instead because I much prefer the programming side of it and being able to apply my knowledge more than just learn the theory and whatnot. Basically, I'll be learning to apply the theory more often than learning about the theory.

    I guess in a typical CompSci degree you'll do things like algorithms, software development etc. and I guess your maths skills don't have to be THAT on point but you'll probably need to have some grounding since everything won't be explained from square 1 (unless you take a foundation year).

    In terms of what a specific course covers, you'll have to check your university choice's website because sometimes the modules vary. Also look at how much they weigh out coursework and exams, because you may have a preference for one or the other.
    Thanks a lot for the help I am actually stuck between computer science and software engineering. Computer science seems to me more respectable but when looking at graduate opportunities both look amazing and as good as each other. What sort of jobs can you get from software engineering then? Thanks a lot for the help, I haven't had experience with either so am really unsure.
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    (Original post by alexp98)
    Thanks a lot for the help I am actually stuck between computer science and software engineering. Computer science seems to me more respectable but when looking at graduate opportunities both look amazing and as good as each other. What sort of jobs can you get from software engineering then? Thanks a lot for the help, I haven't had experience with either so am really unsure.
    To be quite honest with you, I was a bit undecided about the name choice at first because computer science is obviously widely recognised and people have only just started to have an understanding about software engineers!

    As a matter of fact, most compsci Graduates usually go on to be software developers like software engineer graduates. Some may argue that compsci graduates get more versatility from their degree because of the wide range of things that it covers, meaning that you can go into multiple different fields, some of which have nothing to do with your degree but makes good use of your skills e.g. banking, whereas software engineering is more specific.

    There's also the fear that coding and all belongs to the young in the words of mark zuckerberg , therefore software developers are likely to be retired or out of their usual job by the age of 40-45 or something like that because the field needs a group of workers who are up to date with current technology and languages and who knows it more than those who grow up with it?! Though some may argue that the older programmers are more knowledgeable. To be honest, your skill will determine how long you last.:eek:
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    OK so the thing is you can go into the field of economics if you do Engineering/CS but not vice versa.
 
 
 
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