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when to use the subjunctive? watch

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    (Original post by Plantagenet Crown)
    No, it has to be pueda as that is the subjunctive form, puedo is not.
    oh that makes sense now! thank you
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    (Original post by Rainbowcorn)
    can i ask what the common word/phrase for pocket money is? just want to make my spanish sound more 'spanish' if that makes sense! thanks!
    Paga I believe.


    I'm going to bed now; it's 2am in Japan. I'm too tired evidently since I didn't even notice the spelling mistakes on vantaja Shall reply tomorrow! Good luck for now

    By the way, the online dictionary that I used for Spanish and French at university was always: wordreference.com It's exceptional in my opinion. It's my go-to reference for both French and Spanish.
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    (Original post by Rainbowcorn)
    thank you! 'superen' is in the subjunctive form isnt it? thank you again
    Yes it is.
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    (Original post by Rainbowcorn)
    i thought 'pueda' was present just in 3rd person? sorry for all these questions!
    EDIT
    i understand now, thank you!
    http://www.wordreference.com/conj/ESverbs.aspx?v=poder

    Present indicative form of poder:

    puedo
    puedes
    puede
    podemos
    podéis
    pueden
    podés

    In subjunctive present, (yo) puedo = pueda. Also, (él, ella, Ud.) puede = pueda.
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    (Original post by Quick-use)
    Paga I believe.


    I'm going to bed now; it's 2am in Japan. I'm too tired evidently since I didn't even notice the spelling mistakes on vantaja Shall reply tomorrow! Good luck for now

    By the way, the online dictionary that I used for Spanish and French at university was always: wordreference.com It's exceptional in my opinion. It's my go-to reference for both French and Spanish.
    ah thanks night! its only 5pm in the UK though
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    (Original post by Quick-use)
    http://www.wordreference.com/conj/ESverbs.aspx?v=poder

    Present indicative form of poder:

    puedo
    puedes
    puede
    podemos
    podéis
    pueden
    podés

    In subjunctive present, (yo) puedo = pueda. Also, (él, ella, Ud.) puede = pueda.
    thank you for your help! i really appreciate it!
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    (Original post by Rainbowcorn)
    i thought 'pueda' was present just in 3rd person? sorry for all these questions!
    EDIT
    i understand now, thank you!
    You may want to revise the endings of "er" verbs, the 3rd person form is "puede"
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    (Original post by Plantagenet Crown)
    You may want to revise the endings of "er" verbs, the 3rd person form is "puede"
    yes it looks like i will have to! spanish is confusing me right now and i thought it was an AR verb, without thinking clearly!
    thank you
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    (Original post by Omni Vanitas)
    The example you give is very weird in Spanish- you will never see "yo coma" (Spanish person here, never seen it written in my life!). You can say "Espero que coma pronto" (I hope (that) I eat soon) though "espero que pueda comer pronto" is more common.
    (Original post by Plantagenet Crown)
    x
    In bed but this is annoying me. Isn't it more common/natural to say Espero comer pronto as opposed to Espero que coma pronto? Or, Espero poder comer pronto as opposed to espero que pueda comer pronto? Usually, you change the subject when employing the subjunctive right?

    I'm a little rusty with my Spanish nowadays admittedly.
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    (Original post by Quick-use)
    In bed but this is annoying me. Isn't it more common/natural to say Espero comer pronto as opposed to Espero que coma pronto? Or, Espero poder comer pronto as opposed to espero que pueda comer pronto? Usually, you change the subject when employing the subjunctive right?

    I'm a little rusty with my Spanish nowadays admittedly.
    Yes, "espero comer pronto" is what Spaniards would say 99% of the time. "Espero que pueda comer pronto" sounds as if someone is stopping you from eating and so would hardly ever be used.
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    (Original post by Rainbowcorn)
    thank you! 'superen' is in the subjunctive form isnt it? thank you again
    Actually both are correct, superen a or superen a las. It's true that superen las sounds a bit more natural, but both are fine!
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    (Original post by Pcabezas)
    Actually both are correct, superen a or superen a las. It's true that superen las sounds a bit more natural, but both are fine!
    so you dont need the 'a' ? thank you
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    (Original post by Rainbowcorn)
    so you dont need the 'a' ? thank you
    You're welcome.
    No, the verb can be either used as ”Superar algo” or “Superar a algo”
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    (Original post by Pcabezas)
    You're welcome.
    No, the verb can be either used as ”Superar algo” or “Superar a algo”
    I'm a native, (you are too right?), and it sounds a bit strange to me to use "superar a" in this context, it makes it sound as if X is actually fighting and beating the disadvantages like "superar a tus enemigos"
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    (Original post by Plantagenet Crown)
    I'm a native, (you are too right?), and it sounds a bit strange to me to use "superar a" in this context, it makes it sound as if X is actually fighting and beating the disadvantages like "superar a tus enemigos"
    Yes, I'm a native too. Maybe it sounds odd to you because of where you live (?) (Sometimes the way we speak changes a lot between cities) But for me “Las ventajas superan a las desventajas” sounds completely normal.

    Think of it in this way “Los pros superan (en numero) a los contras.” I think that it's all because of “en numero”, which is kindda omitted. Maybe I'm just crazy haha But when I read “Las ventajas superan a las desventajas” I understand that she's omitting to say “en numero”.
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    (Original post by Pcabezas)
    You're welcome.
    No, the verb can be either used as ”Superar algo” or “Superar a algo”
    thanks
 
 
 
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