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Should I apply for medicine? watch

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    (Original post by xyx11)
    Thank you so much for your reply. I have been thinking about applying to Leicester, Keele and Nottingham.
    Don't focus too much on making choices just yet. The UKCAT will be a very important deciding factor next summer and its better to apply strategically.
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    (Original post by ForestCat)
    Its not impossible to come in to medicine without biology and do well. Non-science grads quickly catch up with science grads in GEM courses. Most of a-level biology is pretty irrelevant anyways, and the necessary parts get covered in more detail during the course.

    My point was I am sick of this pervading myth that you need maths for medicine. You only need chemistry (and there are ways around that) and biology to open up the majority of schools. Only Cambridge wants a third science, which can of course be physics.
    Haha, I feel similarly. No idea how this sort of thing became common knowledge.

    Although at Cambridge, one college, Magdalene, insists on maths as a third A Level. So unless somebody has their heart set on that particular university and college, there's no need for maths at A Level.

    With the GEM: some universities specify that they want/prefer a science degree and I'm inclined to think that those universities probably provide less support when it comes to teaching the basics again. It might be the fact that graduates in general are better at learning than non-graduates, because I've found those who study humanities at A Level to be shocking when it comes to grasping even the most basic science-y things.
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    (Original post by Hydeman)
    Haha, I feel similarly. No idea how this sort of thing became common knowledge.

    Although at Cambridge, one college, Magdalene, insists on maths as a third A Level. So unless somebody has their heart set on that particular university and college, there's no need for maths at A Level.

    With the GEM: some universities specify that they want/prefer a science degree and I'm inclined to think that those universities probably provide less support when it comes to teaching the basics again. It might be the fact that graduates in general are better at learning than non-graduates, because I've found those who study humanities at A Level to be shocking when it comes to grasping even the most basic science-y things.
    Thank you! It really ****** me off when people are like 'wait you're not even taking maths?'
    You DO NOT need maths!
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    (Original post by Hydeman)
    Haha, I feel similarly. No idea how this sort of thing became common knowledge.

    Although at Cambridge, one college, Magdalene, insists on maths as a third A Level. So unless somebody has their heart set on that particular university and college, there's no need for maths at A Level.

    With the GEM: some universities specify that they want/prefer a science degree and I'm inclined to think that those universities probably provide less support when it comes to teaching the basics again. It might be the fact that graduates in general are better at learning than non-graduates, because I've found those who study humanities at A Level to be shocking when it comes to grasping even the most basic science-y things.
    I suppose it depends on the way they teach the course. Leicester do a 3 day chem course for grads before we start that gets us up to speed on all the chemistry we'll need.
    I had done bio and chem but not for 7 years when I started the course. I didn't find it too bad. I don't think the non-science grads struggled too much, they just had to look up a few more of the basic concepts.

    The thing you'll find as you go through higher education is often what they've taught you before is wrong. Just as you go from GCSE to a-level and they give you more detail and explain that certain concepts are dumbed down for GCSE and its actually like this... the same applies for a-level biology and medicine. You'll soon find that while what they teach at a-level is a good grounding, it can actually be pretty far from the actual reality. Or that its simply 'we think this is what happens, but we're not really sure'. So you end up re-learning it anyway.
    So a-level biology only really helps you to understand the basics, its not really all that relevant once you get to medicine.
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    (Original post by ForestCat)
    I suppose it depends on the way they teach the course. Leicester do a 3 day chem course for grads before we start that gets us up to speed on all the chemistry we'll need.
    I had done bio and chem but not for 7 years when I started the course. I didn't find it too bad. I don't think the non-science grads struggled too much, they just had to look up a few more of the basic concepts.

    The thing you'll find as you go through higher education is often what they've taught you before is wrong. Just as you go from GCSE to a-level and they give you more detail and explain that certain concepts are dumbed down for GCSE and its actually like this... the same applies for a-level biology and medicine. You'll soon find that while what they teach at a-level is a good grounding, it can actually be pretty far from the actual reality. Or that its simply 'we think this is what happens, but we're not really sure'. So you end up re-learning it anyway.
    So a-level biology only really helps you to understand the basics, its not really all that relevant once you get to medicine.
    Oh, so you're a graduate medic? If it's not too intrusive, can I ask what your first undergraduate degree was in? I have a friend who's hoping to become a doctor through GEM so I'm naturally interested when I meet one of the rare GEM people on TSR.

    Haha, the famous 'jumps' between the levels of education in this country... :rolleyes: From my limited experience of education, I more or less agree that most of the education you receive at school is to prepare you for the next stage rather than any real training in the subject being taught.
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    (Original post by Hydeman)
    Oh, so you're a graduate medic? If it's not too intrusive, can I ask what your first undergraduate degree was in? I have a friend who's hoping to become a doctor through GEM so I'm naturally interested when I meet one of the rare GEM people on TSR.

    Haha, the famous 'jumps' between the levels of education in this country... :rolleyes: From my limited experience of education, I more or less agree that most of the education you receive at school is to prepare you for the next stage rather than any real training in the subject being taught.
    I'm a nurse. And there are quite a few of us grads lurking about.
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    (Original post by ForestCat)
    I'm a nurse. And there are quite a few of us grads lurking about.
    Sorry, I've only met one other person and she's not actually doing GEM yet because she's applying for 2016 entry.
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    (Original post by Hydeman)
    Sorry, I've only met one other person and she's not actually doing GEM yet because she's applying for 2016 entry.
    Don't worry, I was teasing

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