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How boring is a job in finance? watch

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    Its a boring office job. If you wanted to have fun with maths, you'd have become an engineer, researcher, joined the navy or something. Finance pays good but its pure boredom
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    Research Actuarial Profession
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    (Original post by Adeel Ali)
    Research Actuarial Profession
    I've researched that profession but becoming an actuary with an econ degree will take around 6 years apparently with all the tests and work experiences
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    (Original post by _JOKER_)
    I've researched that profession but becoming an actuary with an econ degree will take around 6 years apparently with all the tests and work experiences
    No it can take only 3-4 years if you pass the tests quickly. Also, if you work for a large company, you could be earning £28000 or more as you train. Often, you can get a pay rise for every test that you pass, pushing the salary of a student actuary to around £35000 while you train.

    Look at http://www.actuaries.org.uk/becoming...n-actuary-earn for more information.
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    (Original post by tazarooni89)
    I'm a (nearly qualified) actuary
    In your experience, how feasible is it to become an actuary as a career changer from a non-related field? Say, you've got ok academics, 2:1 physics from a fairly decent uni. Would it be advisable to apply now or try and pass a couple of exams first to show interest?
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    (Original post by Schrödingers Cat)
    :laugh:
    I'm hurt bruh :emo:

    @OP I don't think they're boring
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    (Original post by poorjimmyjimmy)
    In your experience, how feasible is it to become an actuary as a career changer from a non-related field? Say, you've got ok academics, 2:1 physics from a fairly decent uni. Would it be advisable to apply now or try and pass a couple of exams first to show interest?
    It's certainly possible to make that career change, I know a few people who have done it.

    I suppose feasibility might depend on how far advanced in your current career you are, because if you're already quite established then it's unlikely that you'll want to start again from scratch and get through years of gruelling exams.

    Also, the type of person who is able to get through all these exams is more likely to be "very good" academically, rather than just "ok".

    In my experience, it is very unusual that people who are looking to become actuaries would be doing the exams before getting themselves an actual job as an actuarial trainee, because they're quite expensive unless your employer pays for them, they're very difficult to pass and time consuming to study for, so if you end up not managing to secure a role it might turn out to be a waste of time and money. Plus, employers generally don't expect you to have passed exams in your own time anyway.
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    (Original post by Imperion)
    I'm hurt bruh :emo:

    @OP I don't think they're boring
    Why dont you find them boring?
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    (Original post by _JOKER_)
    Why dont you find them boring?
    Eh, first I've don't work in finance - yet! - but they just appeal to me
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    (Original post by Imperion)
    Eh, first I've don't work in finance - yet! - but they just appeal to me
    ohh looool
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    (Original post by tazarooni89)
    It's certainly possible to make that career change, I know a few people who have done it.
    Ah, thanks, that sounds very promising. I think I would be academically able- I was doing well at a top uni at one point, I just has a bit of a snakes n ladders mishap. Looking back, is there anything you think may impress employers other than academic ability i.e. any concrete ways to show interest, tests you can take to prove ability, or good websites I could read up on? Or are they mostly just interested in whether they think you have what it takes to pass all exams?
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    (Original post by poorjimmyjimmy)
    Ah, thanks, that sounds very promising. I think I would be academically able- I was doing well at a top uni at one point, I just has a bit of a snakes n ladders mishap. Looking back, is there anything you think may impress employers other than academic ability i.e. any concrete ways to show interest, tests you can take to prove ability, or good websites I could read up on? Or are they mostly just interested in whether they think you have what it takes to pass all exams?
    I think the most important thing would definitely be the ability to demonstrate that you're academically and technically capable when it comes to complex mathematics and statistics in particular. If you think your degree and other qualifications reflect this you'll probably be okay. If not, you could consider doing the CT1 actuarial exam (I think this is pretty much the only one that anyone would do without being in a job first).

    Apart from that, I expect they'll be looking for:

    Evidence of good soft skills and people skills, especially communication skills, as actuarial work often involves having to communicate actuarial methods and results to non-actuaries who haven't the faintest idea what you're talking about if you don't pitch it to their level

    A good sense of commercial awareness i.e. knowing what's going on in the markets and the industry, keeping abreast of financial news etc. And also understanding the actuarial business specifically, the kinds of roles available for actuaries to fulfil, the reason why they are valuable to their clients and employers, and a general sense of "knowing what you're getting yourself into".

    Your experiences of having worked in a business or administrative environment before, So that you're not going to turn up to the office and be totally lost about what you're supposed to do or how you're supposed to behave there. But I suppose you probably already have that.
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    (Original post by tazarooni89)
    I think the most important thing would definitely be the ability to demonstrate that you're academically and technically capable when it comes to complex mathematics and statistics in particular. If you think your degree and other qualifications reflect this you'll probably be okay. If not, you could consider doing the CT1 actuarial exam (I think this is pretty much the only one that anyone would do without being in a job first).

    Apart from that, I expect they'll be looking for:

    Evidence of good soft skills and people skills, especially communication skills, as actuarial work often involves having to communicate actuarial methods and results to non-actuaries who haven't the faintest idea what you're talking about if you don't pitch it to their level

    A good sense of commercial awareness i.e. knowing what's going on in the markets and the industry, keeping abreast of financial news etc. And also understanding the actuarial business specifically, the kinds of roles available for actuaries to fulfil, the reason why they are valuable to their clients and employers, and a general sense of "knowing what you're getting yourself into".

    Your experiences of having worked in a business or administrative environment before, So that you're not going to turn up to the office and be totally lost about what you're supposed to do or how you're supposed to behave there. But I suppose you probably already have that.
    On a day to day basis what kind of things do you get to do? Is there a lot of variety in the jobs you do? Also how good is the job security at a Big 4 firm?
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    (Original post by _JOKER_)
    Are there any financial jobs that are not boring, not highly stressful and pays well?
    A lot of people here are sensationalising working in finance.

    The reality is, as a graduate, you're going to be doing a 9 to 5 office job, which involves sitting behind a desk, doing admin and working out costs.

    People don't go into finance for a stimulating, exciting career. People go into finance because it's a comfortable sector which pays very well.

    If you want an exciting mathsy job, do engineering or computer science. Finance will only lead you into accountancy, banking or actuary work.
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    (Original post by _JOKER_)
    Are there any financial jobs that are not boring, not highly stressful and pays well?
    People always say working with numbers is boring, but I don't think it is, it's problem solving and fun. Usually with a definitive conclusion that many other jobs don't have. Plus there are many other factors, like how fun are the team you work with, the overall aim of what you are trying to achieve.

    Also, other than traders and investment bankers, many people I know who work in the finance sector work very rigid 9 - 5.30 jobs with lunch hour. Many sectors again don't have that luxury where expectations are for you to work beyond those.

    Basically, always try something at least twice, you might like it.
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    Is it hard to get into a finance job in A-levels and beyond?
    Also what are the best subjects to get into a finance job?
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    Is further maths much more helpful to get into a finance job or is it easy enough with just maths?
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    OP, if you want a job that doesn't involve sitting at a computer go become an air hostess, a tour guide, work for the army - whatever. Most professional jobs will involve a significant time at a desk, that is just the nature of these jobs.

    Every job is going to be a bit boring, every single job. No one is perpetually happy with the job they choose.

    It seems like you're trying to find the easy way out in life.

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    (Original post by Raheel Iqbal)
    Is further maths much more helpful to get into a finance job or is it easy enough with just maths?
    No. Choose a degree you want to do first, narrow down a list of unis, look at the entry requirements for those unis.

    Generally, your university name matters more than your course - so aim for the best.

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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    OP, if you want a job that doesn't involve sitting at a computer go become an air hostess, a tour guide, work for the army - whatever. Most professional jobs will involve a significant time at a desk, that is just the nature of these jobs.

    Every job is going to be a bit boring, every single job. No one is perpetually happy with the job they choose.

    It seems like you're trying to find the easy way out in life.

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    I know that most jobs aren't perfect but what I want to know is there at least a variety of tasks for an actuary etc. Or is a chemical engineer faced with a a variety of jobs and less boring than an actuary.
 
 
 
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