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If transgender why not transrace? watch

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    (Original post by Teslamegafan)
    Wow . . . just how much time do you spend on Tumblr, lol :laugh:
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    (Original post by =incognito=)
    I'd give you the benefit of the doubt and say "uninformed" rather than "bigoted".

    Nobody transitions because "one gender can't achieve something". Trans women (male to female) outnumber trans men 4:1. Trans women face SO MUCH stigma for being true to themselves - and given that patriarchal society generally confers more privilege upon men than women, why would anyone voluntarily relinquish that?

    Trans people transition - and I say this as one of them - because their sense of inner self is at odds with their physical body. Brain scans of trans people have shown that their brain maps resemble that of cisgender people of their preferred gender. In other words, my brain as a trans man more closely reflects that of cisgender men, even though I was born with a female body.

    If you have any questions and can ask them constructively and respectfully I'd be happy to answer them.
    Yes, but surely patriarchal society does not confer the privilege for men to act in an effeminate way? If it did, then they would not transition because they would feel comfortable to act male but also effeminate. I may be completely wrong here, but if society placed different expectations on men and women (and did not discriminate with regards to these), would there be transgender people?
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    (Original post by =incognito=)
    I'd give you the benefit of the doubt and say "uninformed" rather than "bigoted".

    Nobody transitions because "one gender can't achieve something". Trans women (male to female) outnumber trans men 4:1. Trans women face SO MUCH stigma for being true to themselves - and given that patriarchal society generally confers more privilege upon men than women, why would anyone voluntarily relinquish that?

    Trans people transition - and I say this as one of them - because their sense of inner self is at odds with their physical body. Brain scans of trans people have shown that their brain maps resemble that of cisgender people of their preferred gender. In other words, my brain as a trans man more closely reflects that of cisgender men, even though I was born with a female body.

    If you have any questions and can ask them constructively and respectfully I'd be happy to answer them.
    Woah . . . I'm going to have to stop you there; I presume you are talking about the 'gender inequality' in *cough first world countries. The truth is if I was using the University of Berkeley, California's electron microscope right now I still would not be able to locate the patriarchy you are describing; this is annoying because I wanted to send a complaint to their address. I'm not wishing to turn this into a feminism thread but what privileges do men have that women don't. I am always asking feminists this and they always conveniently lose their internet connection :ahee:
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    (Original post by Teslamegafan)
    Woah . . . I'm going to have to stop you there; I presume you are talking about the 'gender inequality' in *cough first world countries. The truth is if I was using the University of Berkeley, California's electron microscope right now I still would not be able to locate the patriarchy you are describing; this is annoying because I wanted to send a complaint to their address. I'm not wishing to turn this into a feminism thread but what privileges do men have that women don't. I am always asking feminists this and they always conveniently lose their internet connection :ahee:
    Actually, I can point this out. There is no patriarchal system at the moment, in my opinion Young people today are unlikely to be sexist, this is a great victory in my eyes. However, there was for such a long time that there is a degree of inertia. There are many people alive today who were brought up before gender equality became the norm. Just because very few people born after 1980 are likely to be sexist does not stop older people who were raised under the old system from discriminating.
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    (Original post by Bjornhattan)
    Yes, but surely patriarchal society does not confer the privilege for men to act in an effeminate way? If it did, then they would not transition because they would feel comfortable to act male but also effeminate. I may be completely wrong here, but if society placed different expectations on men and women (and did not discriminate with regards to these), would there be transgender people?
    Whilst I appreciate the significance of gender stereotypes in defining how men and women are "expected" to behave, I think there would still be trans people. One of the first questions I asked myself before I came out was whether, if I lived on a desert island with nobody else around, I would transition - and the answer is yes. I didn't feel comfortable with my female body (even though there'd be nobody around to see it), because it's just not what my brain is "expecting".

    The closest analogy I can give is almost of phantom limbs. Someone who's had part of their body amputated has a mental map which incorporates, say, that they have two legs - and when one is missing their brain can't cope with the discrepancy between what it's expecting and the fact that their right one is now physically absent. I felt like I wasn't meant to have a female chest, for instance, so I needed surgery to rectify it.
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    (Original post by Teslamegafan)
    Woah . . . I'm going to have to stop you there; I presume you are talking about the 'gender inequality' in *cough first world countries. The truth is if I was using the University of Berkeley, California's electron microscope right now I still would not be able to locate the patriarchy you are describing; this is annoying because I wanted to send a complaint to their address. I'm not wishing to turn this into a feminism thread but what privileges do men have that women don't. I am always asking feminists this and they always conveniently lose their internet connection :ahee:
    Are you male, by any chance?

    2/10, must try harder.

    http://itspronouncedmetrosexual.com/...ale-privilege/
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    Why not transpecies or transmatter?

    Transparent? Transduction? Transportation?
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    (Original post by =incognito=)
    If you have any questions and can ask them constructively and respectfully I'd be happy to answer them.
    You have tumblr don't you?
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    (Original post by Bjornhattan)
    Actually, I can point this out. There is no patriarchal system at the moment, in my opinion Young people today are unlikely to be sexist, this is a great victory in my eyes. However, there was for such a long time that there is a degree of inertia. There are many people alive today who were brought up before gender equality became the norm. Just because very few people born after 1980 are likely to be sexist does not stop older people who were raised under the old system from discriminating.
    That makes a lot of sense and the obvious solution would be to wait for the older generations to die out (bit morbid I know) so we can overcome these old sexist attitudes. However, unfortunately older women (feminists) are causing unnecessary confusion by indoctrinating the younger generations with lies like the gender wage gap to make women feel oppressed even in today's society.
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    (Original post by Jubz1)
    You have tumblr don't you?
    No.
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    (Original post by =incognito=)
    Whilst I appreciate the significance of gender stereotypes in defining how men and women are "expected" to behave, I think there would still be trans people. One of the first questions I asked myself before I came out was whether, if I lived on a desert island with nobody else around, I would transition - and the answer is yes. I didn't feel comfortable with my female body (even though there'd be nobody around to see it), because it's just not what my brain is "expecting".

    The closest analogy I can give is almost of phantom limbs. Someone who's had part of their body amputated has a mental map which incorporates, say, that they have two legs - and when one is missing their brain can't cope with the discrepancy between what it's expecting and the fact that their right one is now physically absent. I felt like I wasn't meant to have a female chest, for instance, so I needed surgery to rectify it.
    Ah, I see. I can't really pass comment on issues relating to trans people, having never experienced these first hand. It's funny, that we are only 1 letter apart on the LGBTQ initials and yet our experiences are a world apart.
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    (Original post by =incognito=)
    Are you male, by any chance?

    2/10, must try harder.

    http://itspronouncedmetrosexual.com/...ale-privilege/
    Only 2/10, disappointed . Anyway still waiting for the list of ways in which western women are oppressed. Oh and by the way this isn't just a men vs women issue. There is a Women Against Feminism Facebook page, if you didn't already know.
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    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show....php?t=3682427

    well universities ain't gonna care lol
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    (Original post by Bjornhattan)
    Ah, I see. I can't really pass comment on issues relating to trans people, having never experienced these first hand. It's funny, that we are only 1 letter apart on the LGBTQ initials and yet our experiences are a world apart.
    Interesting - how do you identify? I think it's fair to say trans people could always use more allies - if you'd like to learn more I can dig out some resources for you. Let me know and I'll drop you a PM.

    (Original post by Teslamegafan)
    Only 2/10, disappointed . Anyway still waiting for the list of ways in which western women are oppressed. Oh and by the way this isn't just a men vs women issue. There is a Women Against Feminism Facebook page, if you didn't already know.
    Not sure if wilfully blind, given that I posted a link listing these above, or generally an idiot. Since I have neither the time nor the crayons to explain this to you, I'm not going to engage in further non-constructive discussion.

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    (Original post by Teslamegafan)
    That makes a lot of sense and the obvious solution would be to wait for the older generations to die out (bit morbid I know) so we can overcome these old sexist attitudes. However, unfortunately older women (feminists) are causing unnecessary confusion by indoctrinating the younger generations with lies like the gender wage gap to make women feel oppressed even in today's society.
    And this does not help matters. We should encourage unity and the belief that all are valued. Let's not turn people against each other. Yes, men have certain privileges. Yes, women have certain privileges. Some are more important than others, and historically men have had more than women. Let's all try to move on and act constructively, treating everyone as an individual.

    Is there a gender earnings gap? Unequivocally yes. Is this decreasing in the first world? Yes. Can factors account for it? Partially, yes. Should it impact on future practice? No. Let's treat everyone the same, pay everyone the same amount for the same work and let's try to move forward as a society.
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    (Original post by Teslamegafan)
    How does your gender define/change who you are or you are expected to be in a way that race does not? Not criticizing, just interested in what you think.
    People of different races can physically and mentally achieve the same things and understand their cultures if they were to be brought up in that environment.

    If, theoretically, you were adopted and brought up, for example, as a Chinese kid in a Chinese family (with you and everyone else in the world believing that you were really Chinese, despite) you would think in a way that reflects the Chinese culture and your Chinese family's culture rather than one that reflects your genetic family's culture.

    Appearances aside, there would be no inherent part of you that protests against and prevents being considered "Chinese".

    However, as a male, if you were told that you were a girl by your family and brought up in that way (with everyone else in the world also believing you a girl) despite this you would feel uncomfortable in the role that society expected you to fulfil. Of course, not everyone who is born a girl likes what is considered "normal girl stuff" and acts "typically feminine" but you wouldn't be able to just happily grow up as a girl in the same way that you could happily grow up as Chinese with a Chinese family. (Like this poor guy: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-11814300)

    Argh sorry, post was a bit too long :P
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    (Original post by =incognito=)
    Interesting - how do you identify? I think it's fair to say trans people could always use more allies - if you'd like to learn more I can dig out some resources for you. Let me know and I'll drop you a PM.
    I identify as Bisexual, but I sort of fluctuate so am not sure. Some days I'm more heterosexual, others I'm more homosexual. It's sort of strange but makes sense to me. Kind of. I'm not particularly in your face about it, but I tell anyone the truth if they specifically ask. But if they ask "Are you gay?", I'll always say no. It's the truth, but it confuses some of them, especially the homophobes.
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    (Original post by =incognito=)
    Interesting - how do you identify? I think it's fair to say trans people could always use more allies - if you'd like to learn more I can dig out some resources for you. Let me know and I'll drop you a PM.



    Not sure if wilfully blind, given that I posted a link listing these above, or generally an idiot. Since I have neither the time nor the crayons to explain this to you, I'm not going to engage in further non-constructive discussion.
    I'm talking about an actual list of how women are oppressed. For example it could include laws that women are not allowed to drive, they are not allowed to vote, they are not allowed to enter certain careers, they are not paid the same as men (contravention of the 1963 Equal Pay Act).
    In the link you posted I can see no laws but rather feelings and subjective opinions about trivial issues. When we are debating whether a major societal problem exists we should be talking about laws not feelings, like "I feel scared if a man looks at me in the supermarket." The writer cannot speak for all women and neither can you. Are there any LAWS oppressing women in the west?
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    (Original post by Bjornhattan)
    And this does not help matters. We should encourage unity and the belief that all are valued. Let's not turn people against each other. Yes, men have certain privileges. Yes, women have certain privileges. Some are more important than others, and historically men have had more than women. Let's all try to move on and act constructively, treating everyone as an individual.

    Is there a gender earnings gap? Unequivocally yes. Is this decreasing in the first world? Yes. Can factors account for it? Partially, yes. Should it impact on future practice? No. Let's treat everyone the same, pay everyone the same amount for the same work and let's try to move forward as a society.
    I like you; you sound like a true egalitarian. And thank you for saying there is a gender earnings gap not a gender wage gap.
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    (Original post by Pronged Lily)
    People of different races can physically and mentally achieve the same things and understand their cultures if they were to be brought up in that environment.

    If, theoretically, you were adopted and brought up, for example, as a Chinese kid in a Chinese family (with you and everyone else in the world believing that you were really Chinese, despite) you would think in a way that reflects the Chinese culture and your Chinese family's culture rather than one that reflects your genetic family's culture.

    Appearances aside, there would be no inherent part of you that protests against and prevents being considered "Chinese".

    However, as a male, if you were told that you were a girl by your family and brought up in that way (with everyone else in the world also believing you a girl) despite this you would feel uncomfortable in the role that society expected you to fulfil. Of course, not everyone who is born a girl likes what is considered "normal girl stuff" and acts "typically feminine" but you wouldn't be able to just happily grow up as a girl in the same way that you could happily grow up as Chinese with a Chinese family. (Like this poor guy: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-11814300)

    Argh sorry, post was a bit too long :P
    It seems what you're saying is gender differences are the result of biology while racial differences are socially constructed. So if it turned out that women are inferior in certain jobs e.g. as CEOs, would you stick to your biology argument or will you say that it is actually a social construct based on what toys they were given during childhood or something?
 
 
 
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