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    (Original post by callum_law)
    For Law, Durham also gives out A*AA offers solely.
    At UCL it is the same, but some will exceed that easily with A*A*A or better. But that doesn't tell the full story, as the students who did Maths and Sciences at A level seemed to be on another planet to those students who did softer subjects.
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    (Original post by callum_law)
    For Law, Durham also gives out A*AA offers solely.



    Bristol is an AAA course, with AAB contextual offers, whereas Durham is an A*AA course. This ignorance is why everyone on this board should ignore every single word that comes out of your opinionated mouth.
    Bristol is an inclusive university, reknowned for reaching out to kids from poorer schools and giving offers on lower grades. Typical offers at Bristol are at about the same level as Durham (AAA or A*AB, LNAT required). The AAB contextual offer applies to the students from poorer schools only.

    Interesting why you have run away just at the moment you lost the argument. Even if Durham ask for an extra A*, it doesn't take a rocket scientist to realise that Bristol's AAA requirements will easily be exceeded by most successful applicants.
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    (Original post by King of the Ring)
    Bristol is an inclusive university, reknowned for reaching out to kids from poorer schools and giving offers on lower grades. Typical offers at Bristol are at about the same level as Durham (AAA or A*AB, LNAT required). The AAB contextual offer applies to the students from poorer schools only.

    Interesting why you have run away just at the moment you lost the argument. Even if Durham ask for an extra A*, it doesn't take a rocket scientist to realise that Bristol's AAA requirements will easily be exceeded by most successful applicants.
    This is hilarious! As a recent law applicant to UCL, Durham, King's, Bristol, and York I can give you first-hand experience on how strict each university is in their application process and I can also give you examples from other students from my high-school.
    I would say that the order of "difficulty to get in" from low to high was as such (I did the IB though, so I don't know about A-level.) : King's and Bristol (very low offers and easy to attain, 35 and 36 respectively), Durham (quite higher, with 38 points), and finally UCL with 39.
    I chose Durham over UCL even though I could have gotten to UCL, since I got a 40. Everyone in my school did not understand at first why I made this choice, because they were completely unaware of Durham's excellence in law, and held UCL at such a high standard due to its international rankings. However, my brother had completed his LLB at UCL and convinced me to avoid it mainly due to the limitations of living in such a chaotic city. I personally preferred the collegiate system in Durham and the considerably smaller size of the university.

    As for other students in my school; let's just say that a fair number of them got into the likes of Bristol and King's with quite average grades. Bristol even accepted some of the students who missed their offers!!! This is unheard of in Durham...
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    (Original post by rennys)
    This is hilarious! As a recent law applicant to UCL, Durham, King's, Bristol, and York I can give you first-hand experience on how strict each university is in their application process and I can also give you examples from other students from my high-school.
    I would say that the order of "difficulty to get in" from low to high was as such (I did the IB though, so I don't know about A-level.) : King's and Bristol (very low offers and easy to attain, 35 and 36 respectively), Durham (quite higher, with 38 points), and finally UCL with 39.
    I chose Durham over UCL even though I could have gotten to UCL, since I got a 40. Everyone in my school did not understand at first why I made this choice, because they were completely unaware of Durham's excellence in law, and held UCL at such a high standard due to its international rankings. However, my brother had completed his LLB at UCL and convinced me to avoid it mainly due to the limitations of living in such a chaotic city. I personally preferred the collegiate system in Durham and the considerably smaller size of the university.

    As for other students in my school; let's just say that a fair number of them got into the likes of Bristol and King's with quite average grades. Bristol even accepted some of the students who missed their offers!!! This is unheard of in Durham...
    It is normal for many top universities to still take on students who miss their offer by one grade. There isn't going to be much difference between students getting AAA and AAB. Also, they take the LNAT score into consideration. As has been stated earlier, Bristol go out of their way to make lower offers to able students from poorer backgrounds, something which Durham does not do. Durham has decided to chase the UK league tables to save the embarrassment of being shown up in World rankings as a second rate university.
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    (Original post by King of the Ring)
    It is normal for many top universities to still take on students who miss their offer by one grade. There isn't going to be much difference between students getting AAA and AAB. Also, they take the LNAT score into consideration. As has been stated earlier, Bristol go out of their way to make lower offers to able students from poorer backgrounds, something which Durham does not do. Durham has decided to chase the UK league tables to save the embarrassment of being shown up in World rankings as a second rate university.
    The problem is, none of the students I mentioned came from a poor background. They are all quite wealthy in fact. I am also aware of some of their LNAT scores and they were not that great.
    I don't think anyone can deny that Durham has a top-notch law school. Whether or not it's on par with UCL does not really matter anyway because at the end of the day, recruiters look at other factors when comparing candidates from Russell Group universities. If a student finds that the academics and social life at Durham suits them better, I find it unreasonable that they choose UCL or LSE just because they fare better internationally. All of these universities have similar academic departments in quality anyway.
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    (Original post by rennys)
    The problem is, none of the students I mentioned came from a poor background. They are all quite wealthy in fact. I am also aware of some of their LNAT scores and they were not that great.
    I don't think anyone can deny that Durham has a top-notch law school. Whether or not it's on par with UCL does not really matter anyway because at the end of the day, recruiters look at other factors when comparing candidates from Russell Group universities. If a student finds that the academics and social life at Durham suits them better, I find it unreasonable that they choose UCL or LSE just because they fare better internationally. All of these universities have similar academic departments in quality anyway.
    I'm sure an AAA grade student who graduates with a good first class degree from a top university like Leeds or Birmingham will do just fine getting a job in a top Law firm. Personally, I think students with Maths and Science A levels at grade A will also be of a much higher calibre than those offering softer subjects.
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    (Original post by King of the Ring)
    Only a fool would turn down a place at the likes of LSE and UCL Law schools for Durham, because they are stronger and are a stone's throw from the London MC firms. UCL is a global university, but is also part of the fabric of London itself, and simply blows Durham out of the water for resources, infrastructure and research power.
    This reeks of immature undergraduate or pre-undergraduate student.

    No one thinks of Durham as an inferior university for law. When you're at this level it doesn't matter where you went to law school, it matters how you did and what you do with that degree. One is not disadvantaged for attending Durham over UCL or LSE. For those interested in human rights law (broadly speaking), Durham has one of the best faculties in the UK. Durham has also seated a HL/UKSC Justice, which LSE has not yet accomplished.

    If Durham Law didn't have reputable and well-known faculty then it wouldn't be gaining research grants from e.g. the European Commission. In the most recent RAE to determine funding from the Government, Durham outperformed Cambridge, Oxford and LSE for impact of research; Durham faculty outperformed UCL and Oxford for quality of research output. Faculty at Durham are just as competent and capable as faculty from similarly situated universities and Durham is not being outclassed by Oxbridge or UCL/LSE for its academic output in law.

    Even in the US, to those familiar with UK law schools, Durham carries a perfectly sufficient reputation.
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    I'm not surprised Edinburgh isn't higher up on the list since students study Scottish Law at university instead of English Law. In order to practice in England, those who have studied Scottish Law need to do a further 2 year conversion course into English Law I think.
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    (Original post by hudamh)
    For a legal profession, of course it does. Over 65% of those with pupillages are from Russel group univeersities. Perhaps it doesn't matter as much for training contracts, but still very important.
    .... This is a strawman. I'm assuming that in your response 'it does' refers to 'it does matter where you went to law school.' If you read in my post, however, that 'when you're at this level...' indicating that once you're at the top level for law schools (Durham, UCL, LSE, Oxbridge, etc.) it doesn't matter where you went, it matters how well you did and what you do with that.

    As such, your rebuttal is superfluous. I nowhere stated that it doesn't matter where you went at all, which is what your strawman is attempting to rebut.
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    (Original post by NYU2012)
    .... This is a strawman. I'm assuming that in your response 'it does' refers to 'it does matter where you went to law school.' If you read in my post, however, that 'when you're at this level...' indicating that once you're at the top level for law schools (Durham, UCL, LSE, Oxbridge, etc.) it doesn't matter where you went, it matters how well you did and what you do with that.

    As such, your rebuttal is superfluous. I nowhere stated that it doesn't matter where you went at all, which is what your strawman is attempting to rebut.
    The Westminster/Eton/Harrow/Winchester/Stowe alumni would not be too interested in Durham, even for Law.
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    (Original post by King of the Ring)
    The Westminster/Eton/Harrow/Winchester/Stowe alumni would not be too interested in Durham, even for Law.
    Weird that I have a lot of friends from those schools then isn't it?

    You're an A-level student who hasn't made it to University yet; you have no personal experience here. You're making comments based off absolutely nothing.
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    Bristol average tariff for law in 2014//15: 486

    Durham average tariff for law in 2014/15: 563
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    Are you the kind of guy who thinks everywhere outside of the M25 is simply 'The Regions'? I suggest approaching Durham and the rest of the North of England in general with less contempt.
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    Why are you basing how good a law school is on how many people it gets into city firms? Maybe UCL has more academic students who pursue further study instead of entering the corporate machine? :/ not everyone wants to be a commercial lawyer!!
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    Durham has very, very good undergrads, and that's what city firms are recruiting so it just lines up to be honest.
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    (Original post by infairverona)
    Why are you basing how good a law school is on how many people it gets into city firms? Maybe UCL has more academic students who pursue further study instead of entering the corporate machine? :/ not everyone wants to be a commercial lawyer!!
    However, lawyers in the city are the ones that earn the most and working for a city firm or magic/silver circle firm is what most law graduates would dream of. Yes you can get into research or decide you want to be a professor but nothing beats working in the city if your a Lawyer. If big firms in the city are recruiting a large number from Durham as opposed to UCL then they must see value in Durham graduates.
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    (Original post by Ali1302)
    However, lawyers in the city are the ones that earn the most and working for a city firm or magic/silver circle firm is what most law graduates would dream of. Yes you can get into research or decide you want to be a professor but nothing beats working in the city if your a Lawyer. If big firms in the city are recruiting a large number from Durham as opposed to UCL then they must see value in Durham graduates.
    Some people don't want to be city lawyers. Just because you think working as city lawyer is the best thing ever, doesn't mean that others do.
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    (Original post by NYU2012)
    Some people don't want to be city lawyers. Just because you think working as city lawyer is the best thing ever, doesn't mean that others do.
    Lets look at it this way you'd end up earning over £100,000 by the age of 25 and the mean is £180,000 by 28 after 5 years experience. Why anyone wouldn't want to earn that much is beyond me. I thought becoming a lawyer was about "winning!!" as opposed to anything else.
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    (Original post by Ali1302)
    Lets look at it this way you'd end up earning over £100,000 by the age of 25 and the mean is £180,000 by 28 after 5 years experience. Why anyone wouldn't want to earn that much is beyond me. I thought becoming a lawyer was about "winning!!" as opposed to anything else.
    Not everyone cares about how much money you're making. I could have entered a London law firm, and I turned it down. I have absolutely no desire to ever work in a corporate law firm.

    Just because you think something is great doesn't mean that others do.
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    (Original post by Ali1302)
    However, lawyers in the city are the ones that earn the most and working for a city firm or magic/silver circle firm is what most law graduates would dream of. Yes you can get into research or decide you want to be a professor but nothing beats working in the city if your a Lawyer. If big firms in the city are recruiting a large number from Durham as opposed to UCL then they must see value in Durham graduates.
    What are you basing this on? If it's your own opinion, which I imagine it is, then I think it's very misguided. Not everyone aspires for the city firms, and actually lots of law students will pick regional firms or firms that have areas like family which the big city firms don't have. Lots of law students also don't even become lawyers, there are far more law/GDL graduates than there are training contracts. It's not all about money either - are you very young by any chance?

    I got a 2.1 in my law degree and I can't think of much worse than being a city commercial lawyer. Yeah the money is good but I would quite like a social life and not to be in the office for stupid hours either. My friend is doing her TC in the city and she's never out of the office before 9pm - no thanks!
 
 
 
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