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Prospects for young people 'have worsened' says report watch

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    Welcome to the future gents!
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    Read the article on the FT much better. Not surprised by it at all. Considering the increase in rents and rising property market reduces social mobility around the country. No job is for life either now, so makes it harder to plan a head.

    But no point complaining just need to crack on!
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    People wanted socialism...
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    Don't forget up until a couple of decades ago, most young people left school at 16 and got a job and earned money. By the time they were in their 20s, they would have saved enough for a deposit on a house. That is 5 years of earnings most graduates don't have and they did not have any student debts.

    Graduates expect to earn a lot more than none graduates but getting a graduate level job that pays enough to make up for 5 years on not earning any money and accumulating debt is a lot harder than most people think.
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    (Original post by balanced)
    That's a nice impartial source there. I like the tuition fees atm (I'm 16).
    You won't like them so much when you see what they did with the interest rates. I also worry they'll sell them off to a hedge fund who will try to change the repayment terms as we saw with the pre 1998 loans

    (Original post by i<3milkshake)
    You like a £30,000 debt?
    Why?

    Mine is £9,000!
    How is it so low? Surely £3,500*3 plus all the maintenance loans too
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    (Original post by mojojojo101)
    You (the student) owe money to someone (in this case the government), what else is that if not debt?
    Ah, but there are two types of debt.
    There's honest debt..... I borrow something of yours..... I am in your debt. The debt is lawful.
    Then there's the dishonest debt created from nothing. We borrow this 'money'. And repay it....even though it never existed in the first place. This is how the bankers make 'their' money ..... by producing no wealth.
    Once, many years ago, banks were places to store money, now they are institutions that deliberately destroy money by it's dilution.
    This corrupt system has worked well for us older types .... and this is (has been) wrong / immoral.
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    I'd like to be optimistic and hope that things are on the up for young people in this country, but things have been pretty dismal for quite a few years and that won't magically just lift. I have to say, looking around me at my own generation - from the people I went to school/college/university with and now to the people of my age that I work with, most of them of my age (or there about) that I can see around me are definitely struggling. I know some very intelligent and hardworking people who are unemployed or working in very low paid jobs - degree educated individuals. But then, I think maybe that's a universal truth of almost all 20-30 year old's who are trying to find their feet and who don't come from a privileged background. It takes time to climb the ladder and figure things out so hopefully things will straighten out in our 30s. But it does seem odd, looking around at your circle of friends and seeing so many bright people out of work or doing jobs that they're overqualified for. I know a few of us who are considering leaving the UK and a couple of friends who left when the recession really dug it's claws in around 2010/11. It's seems like the only sensible thing to do really since the jobs just aren't in abundance here.

    As for the outlook of the younger generation - it doesn't look that great at the moment but in the current economy, I'd say stay in education for as long as possible and get a trade or if you go to uni then do something with a high employment rate which qualifies you for life and something that is in demand in other 1st world countries. There's always your spare time to do your hobbies, I wouldn't waste the opportunity to go to uni on a subject with no real employment prospects. As for housing, once you've got your useful qualification, look for work up North - there are a lot of affordable houses in decent places if you're willing to relocate. It does seem like we're the generation of compromise. You might not get what you've always dreamed of but it's better than having nothing at all. The thing is, the amount of work that you'll put it to get the bare minimum would have got you a lot more 20/30 years ago.
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    (Original post by Maker)
    Stop whining and vote.
    That would be nice, but unfortunately only eighteen year olds are considered mature enough to do that, otherwise I could have voted in May!
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    (Original post by domlang123)
    That would be nice, but unfortunately only eighteen year olds are considered mature enough to do that, otherwise I could have voted in May!
    The problem is a lot of 18-25 people don't vote while older people do so politicians have to keep them sweet with lots of rewards like pensions increasing at a higher rate than most other benefits, increases in inheritance tax thresholds and free TV licences and winter fuel payments.

    If younger people voted in large numbers, politicians will have to keep them sweet so would have to freeze uni fees, increase minimum wage for young people and provide better education.
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    (Original post by Maker)
    Stop whining and vote.
    Pahaha, you are joking right? Which party will fix the huge shortage of houses, immigration, absurd benefits system, and the massive lack of skilled jobs?

    And even if this party appeared from nowhere, it would take them at least 4 years to get into power and then probably another 10-20 years to fix these problems. Sorry, but I'm not waiting a good chunk of my life for a country to get its **** together.
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    The problem with higher education is that far too many people go to university as they just think it's the "normal" route. The alternative route is not as well valued. Far too many universities exist that shouldn't, anything ranked 60 or lower I think should go. Far too many courses which don't lead to anywhere: either the profession is overcrowded, universities woefully prepare graduates for those jobs or those jobs don't exist.
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    (Original post by somethingbeautiful)
    I'd like to be optimistic and hope that things are on the up for young people in this country, but things have been pretty dismal for quite a few years and that won't magically just lift. I have to say, looking around me at my own generation - from the people I went to school/college/university with and now to the people of my age that I work with, most of them of my age (or there about) that I can see around me are definitely struggling. I know some very intelligent and hardworking people who are unemployed or working in very low paid jobs - degree educated individuals. But then, I think maybe that's a universal truth of almost all 20-30 year old's who are trying to find their feet and who don't come from a privileged background. It takes time to climb the ladder and figure things out so hopefully things will straighten out in our 30s. But it does seem odd, looking around at your circle of friends and seeing so many bright people out of work or doing jobs that they're overqualified for. I know a few of us who are considering leaving the UK and a couple of friends who left when the recession really dug it's claws in around 2010/11. It's seems like the only sensible thing to do really since the jobs just aren't in abundance here.

    As for the outlook of the younger generation - it doesn't look that great at the moment but in the current economy, I'd say stay in education for as long as possible and get a trade or if you go to uni then do something with a high employment rate which qualifies you for life and something that is in demand in other 1st world countries. There's always your spare time to do your hobbies, I wouldn't waste the opportunity to go to uni on a subject with no real employment prospects. As for housing, once you've got your useful qualification, look for work up North - there are a lot of affordable houses in decent places if you're willing to relocate. It does seem like we're the generation of compromise. You might not get what you've always dreamed of but it's better than having nothing at all. The thing is, the amount of work that you'll put it to get the bare minimum would have got you a lot more 20/30 years ago.
    Well said.

    And yes I'd go to Australia or the US if I had the means.

    In fairness to all young people, not having everything in your 20s is not something new to this generation, it's always been like that.
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    (Original post by Maker)
    ... young people when they can be bothered to vote will make their demands from politicians. They will demand lower uni fees, better education and wages, more affordable housing etc.

    Of course politicians can ignore the demands of young people now (...) If you want things to get better, go and make your demands and vote or be ignored. You are not entitled to anything, you have to get out and work for it.
    Good point about demands, being proactive is important.
    Young citizens need a voice and a platform from which to address it to politicians. This could be done on the internet, youtube etc., but will need numbers and some consistency.

    I don't have much faith in the establishment's ability to help the population to be honest. Getting out of this situation will be on the ground in the lives of individuals --- make wise decisions, don't be suckered into anything. My prospects were hit by the recession and coming from a small town doesn't help. Personally I'm taking the hard way out now, reinvesting in new skills and being aware of the importance of self-accreditation.

    Above all, life just has to work (it doesn't need to be perfect) so we need a country where people can go through life where things work as they should. People should be able to go through each stage straightforwardly e.g. school, further education if they want and which will help them, living space/working life. For the newest generation (people about 18-27 now) this has been a bit more complex and they have had a couple of problems. It isn't helped by other things going off on the world stage either.
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    If you look back 30 years ago you'll find that getting a job would have been considerably easier than it is now, even if you were a teenager with only GCSE (or O levels if you left school before 1988). I've even heard stories of some people becoming teachers with only GCSE and Teacher's Training!! Compare that to now. People with Bachelor's degrees cant even find jobs.
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    (Original post by Raymat)
    If you look back 30 years ago you'll find that getting a job would have been considerably easier than it is now, even if you were a teenager with only GCSE (or O levels if you left school before 1988). I've even heard stories of some people becoming teachers with only GCSE and Teacher's Training!! Compare that to now. People with Bachelor's degrees cant even find jobs.
    You simply can't compare. There has been tremendous qualification inflation. Now you're expected to go to university whilst back then you weren't.
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    (Original post by Jimbo1234)
    Pahaha, you are joking right? Which party will fix the huge shortage of houses, immigration, absurd benefits system, and the massive lack of skilled jobs?

    And even if this party appeared from nowhere, it would take them at least 4 years to get into power and then probably another 10-20 years to fix these problems. Sorry, but I'm not waiting a good chunk of my life for a country to get its **** together.
    Any party daring to relieve the country from mass immigration (I would like a party to just come along and stop it, it's possible, they're out borders) would be fettered by slurs and propaganda. Same with benefits.

    IMO the country should be more 'hands on' with young people and direct them towards or even impose upon them job-training and apprenticeships.
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    (Original post by Maker)
    Its losers like you who can't be bothered to do anything but whine about it. Listen kid, young people when they can be bothered to vote will make their demands from politicians. They will demand lower uni fees, better education and wages, more affordable housing etc.

    Of course politicians can ignore the demands of young people now because so many like you sit on their arse and complain about it and thats it. If you want things to get better, go and make your demands and vote or be ignored. You are not entitled to anything, you have to get out and work for it.
    BS The house I bought for 7k when average wages were roughly 3k now is 'valued' at well over 200k ...... so now the young need to get off their arses an get a job @ 90K ish ????

    There was / is no party that would have chopped the supply of thin air credit money to keep housing truly affordable.......for which party should the young have voted ????
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    (Original post by Incongruous)
    You simply can't compare. There has been tremendous qualification inflation. Now you're expected to go to university whilst back then you weren't.
    Yes. Just like like the over supply of 'money' ..... kind of, fractional reserve education.
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    (Original post by Maker)
    Don't forget up until a couple of decades ago, most young people left school at 16 and got a job and earned money. By the time they were in their 20s, they would have saved enough for a deposit on a house. That is 5 years of earnings most graduates don't have and they did not have any student debts.

    Graduates expect to earn a lot more than none graduates but getting a graduate level job that pays enough to make up for 5 years on not earning any money and accumulating debt is a lot harder than most people think.
    And not to forget those gap years spent traveling the world - more debt, no income, and no special skills acquired.
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    (Original post by Jimbo1234)
    Pahaha, you are joking right? Which party will fix the huge shortage of houses, immigration, absurd benefits system, and the massive lack of skilled jobs?
    The Tories have been trying though!
 
 
 
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