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    i honestly believe it depends on the university.

    however, I would say physics, maths, history, philosophy are all examples of prestigious degrees.
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    (Original post by Mathematicus65)
    That is totally false. That is how you hope the system would work but it doesn't in any shape or form. In reality all major corporations, employ people based on 1) the prestige of the university they have attended 2) the classification of their degree ie 1st, 2:1, 2:2 etc 3) performance at interview. If what is written on "the silly piece of paper" didn't matter then there would be no purpose of differentiating people by grade at GCSE, a-level and degree level. Basic common sense tells us the higher qualified one is, and the better institution they attended, the greater probability they have of accessing higher paid jobs.
    I assume you are still at school. If you go to a "prestigious" university, you will be repeatedly told you need to get suitable experience and you need to develop your soft skills, because those students that don't and cling to the prestige of their university don't get very far. In the adult world you are judged largely on your individual merit, not on the reputation of your university.
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    (Original post by Quantex)
    I assume you are still at school. If you go to a "prestigious" university, you will be repeatedly told you need to get suitable experience and you need to develop your soft skills, because those students that don't and cling to the prestige of their university don't get very far. In the adult world you are judged largely on your individual merit, not on the reputation of your university.
    These.
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    The course that all the rich and upper class people choose.
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    (Original post by returnmigrant)
    No, they don't.
    Okay so you are implying by that argument that someone with a degree from Oxford, Imperial, Cambridge, Exeter, Bristol and so on, is equal in regards to employability for a specific job than someone with an equivalent degree from say Coventry, Plymouth, etc etc. Realistically if you believe that's how the world works, then you sir, have a major shock coming to you. Evidently, the institution one attended is a major factor otherwise their would be no such thing as univeristy rankings and the statistical evidence that suggest cambridge, Oxford and imperial (etc) graduates are the highest earning in the country, simply wouldn't exist of your notion was correct. Secondly, if prestige didn't have a direct proportionality to success then so many world changers wouldn't have come through the same institutions. We would have equal amount of bankers from Oxford and Portsmouth, we would have equal amounts of prime ministers attending Cambridge and the university of Aberystwyth.
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    (Original post by Quantex)
    I assume you are still at school. If you go to a "prestigious" university, you will be repeatedly told you need to get suitable experience and you need to develop your soft skills, because those students that don't and cling to the prestige of their university don't get very far. In the adult world you are judged largely on your individual merit, not on the reputation of your university.
    Of course experience is also vital. However, no major, high-paying corporation, employs people simply by experience. Whilst personality, and experience, are evidently important, do not underestimate how important degree and the university attended is. From personal experience, as I stated on another thread, I know a few banks and insurance companies that will not consider anyone from Oxford, Cambridge, LSE or bristol at this moment in time.
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    (Original post by returnmigrant)
    No, they don't.
    There is a reason why a surprisingly large proportion of people in the top echelon in our society are graduated from prestigious universities such as Harvard ,MIT, Oxford, Cambridge, Stanford etc., it's because they are ambitious and intelligent people who want to succeed and employers do know that.
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    (Original post by Rek'Sa)
    There is a reason why a surprisingly large proportion of people in the top echelon in our society are graduated from prestigious universities such as Harvard ,MIT, Oxford, Cambridge, Stanford etc., it's because they are ambitious and intelligent people who want to succeed and employers do know that.
    Exactly and that's also the reason why they got admission to those universities.

    But the employers haven't recruited them because of a concept of "prestige" of their degree, and if they weren't able to convince the employer of their ambition, drive and rounded set of skills then they won't get hired.
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    There are two articles that those of you who are still clinging to the archaic idea of 'prestige' need to read - and you need to think carefully about the content of both.

    The first is a Press Release from Deloitte about their recent change in recruitment practice : http://www2.deloitte.com/uk/en/pages...cruitment.html

    The second is an article about this issue within the American college system : http://www.investopedia.com/articles...-important.asp
    Although written about a different University system, the essence of the argument very clearly does still apply to the UK :

    For too many parents and their children, getting into a highly selective school isn’t just another challenge, just another goal,” Bruni wrote. “A yes or no from Amherst or Dartmouth or Duke or Northwestern is seen as the conclusive measure of a young person’s worth, a binding verdict on the life that he or she has led up until that point, an uncontestable harbinger of the successes or disappointments to come.”

    "When American adults were asked how important they thought a job candidate’s alma mater is to hiring managers, fully 80% said it was either very or somewhat important. But when Gallup put the same question to business leaders – the people who are actually in a position to offer graduates jobs – the results were strikingly different. A majority of them, 54%, said it was not very important or not important at all."

    Much of the opinion and attitude of parents, teachers etc is based on assumptions or prejudice, and this is as much about their own insecurities as parents or teachers as providing objective information to 18 year olds.
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    (Original post by Mathematicus65)
    Of course experience is also vital. However, no major, high-paying corporation, employs people simply by experience. Whilst personality, and experience, are evidently important, do not underestimate how important degree and the university attended is. From personal experience, as I stated on another thread, I know a few banks and insurance companies that will not consider anyone from Oxford, Cambridge, LSE or bristol at this moment in time.
    lol, the naiveté.

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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    lol, the naiveté.

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    Apologies I meant "will not consider anyone NOT from Oxford, Cambridge, LSE and Bristol"
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    (Original post by returnmigrant)
    There are two articles that those of you who are still clinging to the archaic idea of 'prestige' need to read - and you need to think carefully about the content of both.

    The first is a Press Release from Deloitte about their recent change in recruitment practice : http://www2.deloitte.com/uk/en/pages...cruitment.html

    The second is an article about this issue within the American college system : http://www.investopedia.com/articles...-important.asp
    Although written about a different University system, the essence of the argument very clearly does still apply to the UK :

    For too many parents and their children, getting into a highly selective school isn’t just another challenge, just another goal,” Bruni wrote. “A yes or no from Amherst or Dartmouth or Duke or Northwestern is seen as the conclusive measure of a young person’s worth, a binding verdict on the life that he or she has led up until that point, an uncontestable harbinger of the successes or disappointments to come.”

    "When American adults were asked how important they thought a job candidate’s alma mater is to hiring managers, fully 80% said it was either very or somewhat important. But when Gallup put the same question to business leaders – the people who are actually in a position to offer graduates jobs – the results were strikingly different. A majority of them, 54%, said it was not very important or not important at all."

    Much of the opinion and attitude of parents, teachers etc is based on assumptions or prejudice, and this is as much about their own insecurities as parents or teachers as providing objective information to 18 year olds.
    Just out of pure interest, what do you study and where at? And what A-Level results did you attain (honestly) ?
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    (Original post by Mathematicus65)
    Just out of pure interest, what do you study and where at? And what A-Level results did you attain (honestly) ?
    They work at a uni.

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    I'm not sure any subjects are 'prestigious' in themselves - surely its more the university that's prestigious? For me the phrase suggests the subject has an illustrious history with many successful/famous/world-changing alumni and is regarded as a 'discipline'. They're the kind of subjects (like Philosophy) that have been studied for a very, very long time.

    For example I'd call History or Physics a more 'prestigious' degree than CompSci even if the argument can be made that CompSci is a more valuable one.
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    The prestige of a uni and degree gives you a head start, however it doesn't help you cross the finish line. Experience is invaluable. Anyone can get a degree nowadays, experience is something only a few can get.
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    In my opinion a degree is prestigious, if it is one of the best ones on one of the best universities (as far as I know Oxford and Cambridge count to them in Britain).
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    (Original post by Mathematicus65)
    Apologies I meant "will not consider anyone NOT from Oxford, Cambridge, LSE and Bristol"
    So they consider guys from Bristol but not Warwick or Imperial, yet Warwick and Imperial grads dominate top rules in prestigious firms along with oxbridge and lse grads.
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    (Original post by INF10)
    So they consider guys from Bristol but not Warwick or Imperial, yet Warwick and Imperial grads dominate top rules in prestigious firms along with oxbridge and lse grads.
    Agreed.
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    (Original post by Kyou)
    The prestige of a uni and degree gives you a head start, however it doesn't help you cross the finish line. Experience is invaluable. Anyone can get a degree nowadays, experience is something only a few can get.
    There is nothing to be added. Top comment! agree with every single word in your statement. A good and even 'prestigious' degree is not a guarantee of having a successful career in the following periods of jobs.
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    (Original post by INF10)
    So they consider guys from Bristol but not Warwick or Imperial, yet Warwick and Imperial grads dominate top rules in prestigious firms along with oxbridge and lse grads.
    I was only referring to a specific sector (banking and insurance). Evidently Imperial is one of the best universities in the world (was the second best by reference to the QS World Rankings recently) and warwick is also one of the best universities in the country. Those two evidently have high performing graduates also as do many other top universities such as Exeter, Durham, UCL etc, so apologies for the confusion.
 
 
 
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