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Doctor or lawyer? watch

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    (Original post by kiera28)
    My sister did.

    Of course you wouldn't reach £100,000 after 10 years of experience. If you don't want to work your way up and stay in the proffession for at least 10 years, then if your own lack of perseverance that's the issue. I don't think you understand what the rest of the country earn. 😂 The average wage is £20,000. If you're correct in saying 'the starting salary is £22,636' then again that is more than the UK national average pay! Across all working ages, let alone people in their mid twenties. It is currently a well paid job- you can't argue with that.

    Yes it's a lot of work. It's up to each individual to decide whether or not it's worth it, depending on how clever or else you are, and how lazy or motivated you are.
    The average is 26k ish, not 20k.

    (Original post by asif007)
    Every other junior doctor earns ~£22,000 in their first job straight out of medical school, but your sister earned £33,000. One of you is lying - I'd be more inclined to believe all the other junior doctors as I've actually seen some of their payslips for a typical month on the job as an FY1. £33,000 is a salary I would expect a doctor to earn once they've been working for 5 years or more in the NHS, not straight out of medical school. I've given you official evidence on the NHS website for the pay at every level of training and I'm not just getting this from hearsay or from the newspapers which are very poorly informed.

    If it's true that the average wage is £20,000 then yes a doctor may be slightly better paid than that in their first job out of medical school. But to me, putting in 6 years of hard work doesn't justify being paid only £636 more than that when I could have earned a higher salary if I'd left school at 16 and worked in a supermarket (it's been proven that retail workers with no qualifications now earn more than junior doctors in the NHS). That £636 extra is negligible when the cost of medical licensing exams goes into the thousands - and every doctor has to pay for that in order to progress to consultant level. I might not understand what the rest of the country earn, but I don't think you understand just how much additional expense goes into medical training, all of which doctors have to pay for themselves. Without it they are not allowed to practice, and after taxes many of them are living off minimum wage. Read that article from The Guardian I showed you in my last post, the evidence is there.

    It might be well-paid at face value and compared to some other jobs (not all of them) but IMHO it's not worth 5 years of study to be paid less than I would if I had worked in a shop. It's got nothing to do with perseverance, there are several doctors leaving Medicine nowadays after working in the NHS for years because the pay is just too little to live on. I'm sorry but, like many other medical students, I'm not happy about graduating so that I can be poor, unable to save any money and unable to support myself, let alone a family.
    22k is the base, there are bandings which can add a bonus on top of that up to 50% (so 33k) if I recall correctly. That does mean working hours that the average person would deem rather unsociable though.
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    (Original post by asif007)
    Every other junior doctor earns ~£22,000 in their first job straight out of medical school, but your sister earned £33,000. One of you is lying - I'd be more inclined to believe all the other junior doctors as I've actually seen some of their payslips for a typical month
    £22k is the base salary to which banding is added. Most jobs are banded. Most FY1s would be closer to £30k than £22k.
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    (Original post by asif007)
    Every other junior doctor earns ~£22,000 in their first job straight out of medical school, but your sister earned £33,000. One of you is lying - I'd be more inclined to believe all the other junior doctors as I've actually seen some of their payslips for a typical month on the job as an FY1. £33,000 is a salary I would expect a doctor to earn once they've been working for 5 years or more in the NHS, not straight out of medical school. I've given you official evidence on the NHS website for the pay at every level of training and I'm not just getting this from hearsay or from the newspapers which are very poorly informed.

    If it's true that the average wage is £20,000 then yes a doctor may be slightly better paid than that in their first job out of medical school. But to me, putting in 6 years of hard work doesn't justify being paid only £636 more than that when I could have earned a higher salary if I'd left school at 16 and worked in a supermarket (it's been proven that retail workers with no qualifications now earn more than junior doctors in the NHS). That £636 extra is negligible when the cost of medical licensing exams goes into the thousands - and every doctor has to pay for that in order to progress to consultant level. I might not understand what the rest of the country earn, but I don't think you understand just how much additional expense goes into medical training, all of which doctors have to pay for themselves. Without it they are not allowed to practice, and after taxes many of them are living off minimum wage. Read that article from The Guardian I showed you in my last post, the evidence is there.

    It might be well-paid at face value and compared to some other jobs (not all of them) but IMHO it's not worth 5 years of study to be paid less than I would if I had worked in a shop. It's got nothing to do with perseverance, there are several doctors leaving Medicine nowadays after working in the NHS for years because the pay is just too little to live on. I'm sorry but, like many other medical students, I'm not happy about graduating so that I can be poor, unable to save any money and unable to support myself, let alone a family.
    I'm not lying haha, and she excitedly showed me the email showing her the job offer with all the details. Sorry to disappoint.

    Sorry just wanted to say that isn't the average starting salary. It's the average salary. The average salary for people in their 20s is much lower.
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    (Original post by Potally_Tissed)

    22k is the base, there are bandings which can add a bonus on top of that up to 50% (so 33k) if I recall correctly. That does mean working hours that the average person would deem rather unsociable though.
    (Original post by Etomidate)
    £22k is the base salary to which banding is added. Most jobs are banded. Most FY1s would be closer to £30k than £22k.
    This is news to me. Does that mean I would be expected to do more work in antisocial hours on top of plain time to get closer to £30k as an FY1? TBH I don't want to be working all the hours under the sun.
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    Grey's Anatomy vs How To Get Away With Murder

    Both created by Shonda Rhimes


    Nuff said
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    (Original post by asif007)
    This is news to me. Does that mean I would be expected to do more work in antisocial hours on top of plain time to get closer to £30k as an FY1? TBH I don't want to be working all the hours under the sun.
    As an FY1 you will work nights, weekends and evenings with the occasional 12 day stretch.

    Obviously things are also very much up in the air at the moment with the contract debate.
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    So from what I can see right now I want be a lawyer.
    I love actually debating not sitting down and doing papers, but in school I have always been top for debating with the work with it. So as long as I'm doing the actual debate I don't care about the papers.

    THE ONLY issue is my English I dont know if I'm going to be good enough. Right now I'm doing great. But don't know about the future.

    If I became a lawyer in England then wanted to move to a different country would it be easy to find a job?
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    (Original post by Maya461)
    So from what I can see right now I want be a lawyer.
    I love actually debating not sitting down and doing papers, but in school I have always been top for debating with the work with it. So as long as I'm doing the actual debate I don't care about the papers.

    THE ONLY issue is my English I dont know if I'm going to be good enough. Right now I'm doing great. But don't know about the future.

    If I became a lawyer in England then wanted to move to a different country would it be easy to find a job?
    What you need to bear in mind with that is that English legal qualifications apply to the English legal system. As other countries have different systems and different laws, you may well find that your qualifications do not in fact qualify you for anything abroad.
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    Why don't you do some work experience or shadowing?

    After all that is the whole point, so see what the job is really like.
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    (Original post by Potally_Tissed)
    What you need to bear in mind with that is that English legal qualifications apply to the English legal system. As other countries have different systems and different laws, you may well find that your qualifications do not in fact qualify you for anything abroad.
    This. ^ Although you could try and work for a large London International firm and ask for a transfer a good few years down the line. But I think this is the only way. :dontknow:
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    My gosh that was just my question. Does anyone know any law firms that allow under 16s to work??
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    Does anyone know any firms that would know any law firms in Manchester that would allow a 15 year old to work in their firm
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    (Original post by Maya461)
    So from what I can see right now I want be a lawyer.
    I love actually debating not sitting down and doing papers, but in school I have always been top for debating with the work with it. So as long as I'm doing the actual debate I don't care about the papers.

    THE ONLY issue is my English I dont know if I'm going to be good enough. Right now I'm doing great. But don't know about the future.

    If I became a lawyer in England then wanted to move to a different country would it be easy to find a job?
    When you say you want to be a lawyer or doctor, are they what your parents told you you should do because they are good jobs? They are both extremely different jobs.
    Try the Prospects Planner utility if you're unsure, to get an idea
 
 
 
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