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Is there a need for GP surgeries to be open 7 days a week? watch

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    I don't think there will be enough demand, were every GP practice be forced to open on weekends, thus would be a waste of resources.

    In the long term, moving people away from A+E into GP practices is the best plan, however it will take time to disseminate that information.

    Thus, some GPs should begin this, then over time more and more will. The demand WILL be there, but not yet.

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    I think it should be left to the GP to make this decision. Not every GP will have the demand, and so it would be a waste of resources. The focus should be on moving people from A and E to GPs, but whether that has an impact on weekend demand, I don't know.
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    Interesting points. I wonder if those complaining they cannot see a doctor for X amount of weeks would prefer to see more resource during the traditional hours rather than extra spend for weekend hours?
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    Less low-skilled immigration would help this issue. Less people using the doctor=less hours surgeries need to be open for!
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    Someone just tweeted this photograph to us of an empty GP surgery on a Sunday afternoon... it seems to support our evidence.

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    If you are not willing to take a short amount of time off work to see the GP then it is probably about something not important anyway. Opening on saturdays will increase the amount of unnecessary appointments by people who work. Furthermore by working on a saturday that GP wont be working on a weekday instead, this therefore wont help with waiting times for appointments. If you have an emergency like a heart attack you should be going to a&e not a gp whether thats a weekend or a weekday.
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    I think improved weekend access would be sensible. The research seems to indicate that Saturday would be a better choice than Sunday.
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    For those who work full-time, it would certainly be useful to have appointments over the weekend.
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    (Original post by OU Student)
    If GPs were open 7 days a week, maybe people wouldn't be waiting so long for a doctor's appointment. The last time I needed an appointment, I had to wait a week for one.
    There's no extra money for more doctors though, so there would still be the same number of appointments, spread over 7 days instead of 5. I don't think just pushing to 7 day opening would improve access that much.

    The GP practice I briefly worked in did Saturday clinics, but there would nearly always be unfilled appointments and a higher rate of missed appointments than midweek.
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    (Original post by University of East Anglia)
    Interesting points. I wonder if those complaining they cannot see a doctor for X amount of weeks would prefer to see more resource during the traditional hours rather than extra spend for weekend hours?
    I am afraid you have missed the point with this research.

    G.Ps surgeries have two entirely separate markets.

    They are managers of the chronic conditions of people who are usually time rich but often dependent on public or other people's private transport for access to the doctor. Those people are comfortable with the present arrangements. They can see a doctor any time but preferably when buses are running or friends and family can run them about.

    Secondly G.P.s are the gatekeepers of access to the NHS for anyone who is not an emergency case. For those people who are working and possibly commuting, the present system is wholly unfit for purpose.

    The government had a go at separating out these functions with NHS walk in centres but (a) G.Ps are still in competition with them and (b) many are nurse led and therefore incapable of fulfilling the gate-keeping function.

    As more patients fall in the first market the results of your survey were inevitable.

    If you had asked patients seeking a first appointment with a G.P. for a condition, I think you would have got a wholly different answer.
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    (Original post by jooby92)
    If you are not willing to take a short amount of time off work to see the GP then it is probably about something not important anyway. Opening on saturdays will increase the amount of unnecessary appointments by people who work. Furthermore by working on a saturday that GP wont be working on a weekday instead, this therefore wont help with waiting times for appointments. If you have an emergency like a heart attack you should be going to a&e not a gp whether thats a weekend or a weekday.
    Um have you ever worked, unless you have a sympathetic employer they will refuse you and even if they let you you can get called into HR for excessive time off as they think you are skiving.

    I had a friend with bad diabetes who was refused breaks from his manager which were required for insulin or to keep his blood sugar up, even when he fainted at work they forced him to continue only when he collapsed and had to spend a week in hospital did they help.

    They even refused him time off to see doctors at the hospital knowing he has diabetes and heart problems.

    (Original post by billydisco)
    Less low-skilled immigration would help this issue. Less people using the doctor=less hours surgeries need to be open for!
    When I was at the hospital last year I arrived about 30 minutes early for an appointment and ended up actually getting served 5 minutes after the appointment time.

    The reason? a Polish woman who spoke NO English needed everything translated from her name, date of birth, and had to ask singular dates of availability, or even with the translator kept saying "I dont understand"

    Meanwhile a queue of people were behind me late for appointments due to her.
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    (Original post by drbluebox)
    Um have you ever worked, unless you have a sympathetic employer they will refuse you and even if they let you you can get called into HR for excessive time off as they think you are skiving.

    I had a friend with bad diabetes who was refused breaks from his manager which were required for insulin or to keep his blood sugar up, even when he fainted at work they forced him to continue only when he collapsed and had to spend a week in hospital did they help.

    They even refused him time off to see doctors at the hospital knowing he has diabetes and heart problems.



    When I was at the hospital last year I arrived about 30 minutes early for an appointment and ended up actually getting served 5 minutes after the appointment time.

    The reason? a Polish woman who spoke NO English needed everything translated from her name, date of birth, and had to ask singular dates of availability, or even with the translator kept saying "I dont understand"

    Meanwhile a queue of people were behind me late for appointments due to her.
    Sounds illegal to prevent you from taking your insulin, it only takes 2 mins to do, do they stop you going to the toilet aswell?

    The issue there is the employer, no one needs to be seeing their GP every week so there should be no restrictions in taking time off for health reasons.

    Fix the issue which is the employer. This applied to anything, always fix the route cause of the problem not trying to reduce the effect of the problem eg by opening gp's on weekends
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    It depends when I need an appointment. If I have a problem on Monday and need to see a GP, I don't want to wait till Sunday, but if I have a problem Saturday, I'd rather go in on Sunday than Monday... It's all in the timing.
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    (Original post by jooby92)
    Sounds illegal to prevent you from taking your insulin, it only takes 2 mins to do, do they stop you going to the toilet aswell?

    The issue there is the employer, no one needs to be seeing their GP every week so there should be no restrictions in taking time off for health reasons.

    Fix the issue which is the employer. This applied to anything, always fix the route cause of the problem not trying to reduce the effect of the problem eg by opening gp's on weekends
    My friend used to tell his employer (one of the supermarket chains) of his hospital appointments like a month in advance and tell them to work their shifts around that and was told "no special treatement"

    My old employer was a call centre so used to time your breaks to toilet and if you had too many discipline you.

    Employers now know they can get away with things due to desperate staff.
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    (Original post by drbluebox)
    My friend used to tell his employer (one of the supermarket chains) of his hospital appointments like a month in advance and tell them to work their shifts around that and was told "no special treatement"

    My old employer was a call centre so used to time your breaks to toilet and if you had too many discipline you.

    Employers now know they can get away with things due to desperate staff.
    As per the Equalities Act, this treatment is actually illegal. They'd soon be in serious trouble if something serious happened to him.

    I'm seriously considering changing GP surgery. As wonderful as it is having a surgery 50 meters from me, having to wait over a week just for an apointment is becoming bloody ridiculous.
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    Why shouldn't they open 7 days. Both my husband and son work away mon-fri and most people work these days. How then, tell me, are we to access doctors when many people just cannot physically get to attend during practice hours. I'm speaking from experience of trying to get time off work just to fit in an appointment in around doctors opening hours. Seems you only benefit from these time slots if you are not a worker. It's ridiculous.
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    (Original post by _icecream)
    In my area it's 1 whole month to wait for an appointment. Before about 5 years ago before the Tories I could just walk into a GP and been seen pretty much the same day.It's the same in every public sector place such as the council it takes absolute ages to sort stuff out because of the cuts.
    And yet there's still been significant increases in funding over those five years. So why are you blaming a political party that has increased spending?
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    (Original post by Tiger Rag)
    As per the Equalities Act, this treatment is actually illegal. They'd soon be in serious trouble if something serious happened to him.

    I'm seriously considering changing GP surgery. As wonderful as it is having a surgery 50 meters from me, having to wait over a week just for an apointment is becoming bloody ridiculous.
    I actually found out recently he wanted to transfer to a different branch as where he lives now is high rent, treated like dirt by his supervisors etc.

    Was told no because he is taking unauthorised absences (to go for hospital appointments made worse by his physical and mental heath so bad due to treated so bad)

    They flat out told him no other store would have him.
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    I think later openings on weekdays is more better than sunday openings.
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    (Original post by Nununu)
    I think later openings on weekdays is more better than sunday openings.
    I'd rather have this.
 
 
 
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