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    (Original post by hana&feather)
    I am now contemplating this option as my situation resonated with many on the thread (challenging behaviour, lack of support from the school/ uni, being criticised for things not entirely my fault alongside with the usual lack of time for family etc.). I did well last term when working with small groups and individuals in a challenging class, but found teaching the whole class v hard, considering the level my observers expected me to be (i.e. all children engaged in learning while not even the qualified experienced class teacher can manage that most of the time).

    My coursemates, my friends and my family all said that I'll make a great teacher, and I did manage to get some positive outcomes from my interventions in the placement prior to my withdrawal due to stress. However, I am really not sure now. Yet if I stop the course now, it just seems that I have thrown away a good working environment (12 years industry experience) for nothing but stress, unemployment and a massive student debt.

    Was it difficult to gain employment as a TA/LSA after dropping out from PGCE? I am still committed to education but am worried that schools would look down upon my experience.
    Hi, it's a shame isn't it that we had a bad experience. Had I been in a different school and had a supportive mentor I think I would have done better. I left because I felt was the best thing for me to do at the time. First of all do not worry at all, I found it really easy to get a TA job. The first school which I applied to accepted me. Also they don't need to know the reason you left just say you're taking a break because you wanted to gain more experience working in smaller groups. I only mentioned the positive aspects of my pgce I didn't tell them about my grade and what I found difficult. I think this is a good choice for me as I know I want to stay in education and like working in small groups of children I can always carry on with it long term if I decide not to go back to teaching but the experience will help me for teaching if I do want to go back to it. I've deferred placement two for next January so I may go back then to finish the rest of the pgce. Good luck in whatever you decide
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    (Original post by sabana)
    Hi, it's a shame isn't it that we had a bad experience. Had I been in a different school and had a supportive mentor I think I would have done better. I left because I felt was the best thing for me to do at the time. First of all do not worry at all, I found it really easy to get a TA job. The first school which I applied to accepted me. Also they don't need to know the reason you left just say you're taking a break because you wanted to gain more experience working in smaller groups. I only mentioned the positive aspects of my pgce I didn't tell them about my grade and what I found difficult. I think this is a good choice for me as I know I want to stay in education and like working in small groups of children I can always carry on with it long term if I decide not to go back to teaching but the experience will help me for teaching if I do want to go back to it. I've deferred placement two for next January so I may go back then to finish the rest of the pgce. Good luck in whatever you decide
    Thank you that's encouraging! I've just been told that it'd be September that I may retake my placement. Meanwhile, I have some assignment and a non-teaching placement in an alternative key stage to keep me busy until just after Easter. I love working with small groups and the experience on that matter had so far been positive, so I would seek some TA jobs in the summer to keep me going!
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    (Original post by hana&feather)
    Thank you that's encouraging! I've just been told that it'd be September that I may retake my placement. Meanwhile, I have some assignment and a non-teaching placement in an alternative key stage to keep me busy until just after Easter. I love working with small groups and the experience on that matter had so far been positive, so I would seek some TA jobs in the summer to keep me going!
    Ooooh so are you planning to retake just one placement or to do the whole pgce again from the start?
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    I feel a bit scared reading this thread! I'm sorry for your experiences, the amount of politics in teaching seems so disheartening.

    I'm considering teaching as a career change - long story short, started a master's, constantly felt like I was running to catch up in the field I wanted, had a really bad experience at uni that led to constant panic attacks so I left. Am I setting myself up for basically the same thing if I start a PGCE?
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    (Original post by Chocomento)
    I feel a bit scared reading this thread! I'm sorry for your experiences, the amount of politics in teaching seems so disheartening.

    I'm considering teaching as a career change - long story short, started a master's, constantly felt like I was running to catch up in the field I wanted, had a really bad experience at uni that led to constant panic attacks so I left. Am I setting myself up for basically the same thing if I start a PGCE?
    I would seriously wait until you are in a place where you can be sure this won't happen to you again before starting a PGCE. It is a punishing and gruelling course and if you aren't feeling 100% robust at the outset, it may be a very unpleasant experience for you.
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    (Original post by sabana)
    Ooooh so are you planning to retake just one placement or to do the whole pgce again from the start?
    I'll need to retake my teaching practice from September (if they can find a placement) and then do the final placement. This is on the condition that I found myself a 4-week placement in the summer term to show my 'commitment' to teaching and to rebuild my confidence.

    tbh the fact that I haven't run away like another coursemate placed in the same school did after Christmas, shows my commitment to teaching. My consideration is not the work involved but whether the provider and its partner schools can give me the support I need.
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    (Original post by Chocomento)
    I feel a bit scared reading this thread! I'm sorry for your experiences, the amount of politics in teaching seems so disheartening.

    I'm considering teaching as a career change - long story short, started a master's, constantly felt like I was running to catch up in the field I wanted, had a really bad experience at uni that led to constant panic attacks so I left. Am I setting myself up for basically the same thing if I start a PGCE?
    I had a full-time career involving evening and weekend on calls plus working into the evenings on some days to meet tight payroll deadlines. I then worked part-time alongside studying for a Master's, volunteering in schools and leading the Sunday School, while having two primary-aged children to look after. I am no stranger to hard work and stress, yet I still got myself into a difficult situation.

    If you have experienced a panic attack and running to catch up already, PGCE is much worse than doing a Masters'. Do not take the course unless you are 120% sure. I now wished I had worked as a TA/LSA to build up confidence and teaching skills before going into teacher training.

    That said, the support you get from school and ITT would make a massive difference to your outcome. Some of my initially weaker coursemates have flourished in their supportive classes.
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    (Original post by hana&feather)
    I had a full-time career involving evening and weekend on calls plus working into the evenings on some days to meet tight payroll deadlines. I then worked part-time alongside studying for a Master's, volunteering in schools and leading the Sunday School, while having two primary-aged children to look after. I am no stranger to hard work and stress, yet I still got myself into a difficult situation.

    If you have experienced a panic attack and running to catch up already, PGCE is much worse than doing a Masters'. Do not take the course unless you are 120% sure. I now wished I had worked as a TA/LSA to build up confidence and teaching skills before going into teacher training.

    That said, the support you get from school and ITT would make a massive difference to your outcome. Some of my initially weaker coursemates have flourished in their supportive classes.
    I 100% agree with this confidence is key and your teaching skills it's a good idea to get as much classroom experience as you can before the pgce to help with this. The mentor also has a big impact into how your placement will turn out a fair few people told me your mentor can either make or break your placement. And unfortunately in my case it was the latter.
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    Thank you so much for speaking about your experiences while doing teacher training. I have learnt so much from what everyone has said about their experiences. It has made me realise that I should make sure that I should train in the right place. It is so hard to find the right place but I have learnt to be patient. Thank you again and I wish all the best in your future careers.
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    (Original post by hana&feather)
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    (Original post by Carnationlilyrose)
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    (Original post by sabana)
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    Thanks for your replies. I've had panic attacks for years, but going back to uni again made everything worse. On the PGCE, is it a case of intense workload? Constantly moving goalposts?
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    (Original post by Chocomento)
    Thanks for your replies. I've had panic attacks for years, but going back to uni again made everything worse. On the PGCE, is it a case of intense workload? Constantly moving goalposts?
    Yes it is very intense. uni days are typically 9-4 M-F plus readings, mini tasks and assignments. Placement days started off 8-5 then I was doing more like 7.30 to 6/6.30 plus planning, making resources, reflections and readings in the evenings and weekends.In term of moving goalposts, there are always things to learn and new targets to work towards. That is the nature of the profession. However, some tutors seem to like finding minor faults, e.g. pupils not reciting the LO. It is like a lottery whether you get a nice tutor or a good school.The problem is, bad experience can be so soul-destroying. In industry you can get nasty managers and colleagues, but that can be handled as you're just there for the money. In education you care about the role and the students so it is harder when things go wrong. It is not just the trainees having problems. I have seen experienced, qualified teachers in tears because of SLT comments or extreme behaviour of the children.
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    Do the pros and cons thing.

    For finishing
    I like to finish what ive started
    Get a qualification.

    Do you know the financial implications? If you quit now is it less tha if you quit at the end?

    Against finishing

    You generally hate it. (its the whole thing not just the placement)
    You cna owe less money.
    You have soemthing else to do.


    Try and do what you enjoy.
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    Thank God that I have found this thread. I quit my PGCE course last month and that was after being on sick leave for a months from suffering anxiety. It was not an easy decision to make. I was unfortunately diagnosed with dyslexia while I was on the course and was told that I would have difficulty reading and writing at Masters level. This was a major shock to me and completely knocked my confidence, considering that I gotten through my undergrad and got a good solid 2.1. To make things worse my school- placement mentor was not supportive, when I told him about my dyslexia. He basically told me to man up (women in my case) and stop using dyslexia as an excuse, even though I was working as hard and the best as I could. I have only recently found out that I was being discriminated against by my mentor and was actually entitled to extra support to help me overcome some of the limitation that I have with dyslexia but unfortunately to late for me to do anything about it.

    Believe me I did not underestimate that PGCE was going to be hard and how hard I would have to work for it, but when I realised I was working the hardest and the best that I could and I was barely scratching the surface, was really demoralising for me. Don't get me wrong after all the lesson planning, paper work, faculty and school meetings, assignments, reflective portfolio writing ect.., I actually enjoyed the teaching part of being a teacher. In the end my mental health ended up suffering and I am still recovering one month after dropping out.

    Becoming a teacher was what I always wanted to be but after seeing the bureaucracy and politics involved on top of teaching, I decide that perhaps this is not the right career for me.

    Now I've moved back home with my parents, who haven't been as supportive as I hoped, while trying to pick up the pieces of my life. I'm 25 and I don't know where to start again? I am looking to going back to teaching TEFL (completely different from teaching mainstream) or starting a career somewhere else. How do you go about explaining on ones CV that you have spent the last 5-6 months on PGCE course before dropping out as well as being dyslexic?

    I would much appreciate any advice and support. It good to know that others have been where I have been and have felt what I have felt.
    Apologise for any spelling or grammatical mistakes.
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    Hi Sandra (I'm guessing from your name!),

    Yeah you definitely aren't on your own! Although, I have to admit your circumstances are definitely worse than my own with the discrimination and all of that.
    Whilst I can't say my mentor has been discriminating, he certainly isn't one to provide you with a morale-booster. I completely realise he's trying to help, for which I'm grateful, but he's not exactly the best at it - most of the comments are purely picking up negative points with a very small asterisk at the bottom with positives (you're talking 90%-10%).
    In honesty, I thought it was because I was doing really badly but when I went on my second placement in an outstanding school (so you'd think standards would be higher), all observers would put as big an emphasis on all the positives as the negatives (or what they called 'targets') and it really did make me feel a lot better about myself i.e. not dreading every lesson because I know it's just going to be met with negative feedback. I'm now back at my home school and it seems that it's starting over again, dreading lessons (but now the workload's higher).

    I've told myself that the time to quit was November/December where I was really teetering on the edge of it but I'm getting a big bursary and I just want a qualification and that's it.

    You mention TEFL and I could well be doing something similar next year in France. My girlfriend's doing an assistantship in a French school next year and I'm going to look out there when she finds out where she gets placed. It'll basically be a case of sending my CV out to every school/college/university/language school in the area to see if they need an English teacher or assistant!
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    (Original post by lovinsandra991)
    .Now I've moved back home with my parents, who haven't been as supportive as I hoped, while trying to pick up the pieces of my life. I'm 25 and I don't know where to start again? I am looking to going back to teaching TEFL (completely different from teaching mainstream) or starting a career somewhere else. How do you go about explaining on ones CV that you have spent the last 5-6 months on PGCE course before dropping out as well as being dyslexic?

    I would much appreciate any advice and support. It good to know that others have been where I have been and have felt what I have felt.
    Apologise for any spelling or grammatical mistakes.
    I'm also 25 and living at home but at the end of the year will be in a similar boat to yourself. You can explain that the reason you dropped out was because of health issues, which is true. As far as your dyslexia goes, you can always explain that you are learning ways to deal with it and indeed how you are dealing with. Don't emphasise it as a negative, use it as a way to show the positives in your character (determination, resilience etc.).

    Hope that helps!
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    I seem to completely relate to so much what you both have said. Different parts though. I have messaged you both in order not to bore everyone with my long essays.
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    I know this is for last years PGCE...but I have just left this years...I have a job lined up. But I have not felt at all supported and not had the opportunities my peers have, neither have I felt so unwelcome or uncomfortable in any place of work in my life. I felt we were no more than a source of cheap labour. And I had to share my placement. Not work a loss of years pay and running up 17k of debt for.I hated going into the school and it was starting to make me feel ill. I feel better already, it wasn't an easy decision. But hey, onwards and upwards. I still have a degree, that opens doors. I will not regret this decision.
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    (Original post by Olly's mum)
    I know this is for last years PGCE...but I have just left this years...I have a job lined up. But I have not felt at all supported and not had the opportunities my peers have, neither have I felt so unwelcome or uncomfortable in any place of work in my life. I felt we were no more than a source of cheap labour. And I had to share my placement. Not work a loss of years pay and running up 17k of debt for.I hated going into the school and it was starting to make me feel ill. I feel better already, it wasn't an easy decision. But hey, onwards and upwards. I still have a degree, that opens doors. I will not regret this decision.
    I am sorry to hear that. It seems people's experiences vary a lot and it does appear to be very much pot luck on which school you get.
    I did a QTS degree and did 4 placements and experiences varied a lot too. One was so bad that it caused me to drop out of teaching in the UK entirely.
    I am sure you will find your feet though. I now feel I have the best job in the world (still teaching but in another field). And yes dropping QTS was a good thing for me. It might be the same for you too.
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    I'm relieved to have found this thread and people who have actually made the decision to leave, rather than force themselves to finish the course.
    Can I ask what you're all doing now?

    I started my PGCE in September and enjoyed the initial weeks but have had a nagging feeling that this isn't what I really want to do. At the start of this week I had a very bad formal observation that really knocked my confidence. The next day I taught another class which I thought was mediocre but not awful. Afterwards my mentor completely ripped it to shreds, saying it was an 'embarrassment', I'm not warm enough and my subject knowledge is poor. She also said that I was allowed one more lesson with them and if I don't do well, I won't be able to teach them anymore. I was completely humiliated, cried and dreaded seeing her again. Today I had some much better lessons but she made some more comments that I felt went beyond the objective into the personal. I have no problem with criticism, especially if it's constructive, but the way this was delivered just seemed mean.

    This experience made me think more closely about the doubts I was already having and I now feel that teaching may not be for me. I love working with young people but the workload, data, targets and 'teaching to the test' just make me feel depressed. I also have almost no time to see my family or boyfriend and I am concerned about my mental health which has been reasonably good for the past year or so after a lot of careful work.

    The thought of even doing a pretty boring job but having actual days off seems great right now but I am concerned about leaving mainly because of how it will look on a CV. I personally believe it's a good thing to quit something that you hate and you know you won't go anything further with, but I know employers might not feel the same. So I'm wondering what your experiences have been like?
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    (Original post by travelfiend)
    I'm relieved to have found this thread and people who have actually made the decision to leave, rather than force themselves to finish the course.
    Can I ask what you're all doing now?

    I started my PGCE in September and enjoyed the initial weeks but have had a nagging feeling that this isn't what I really want to do. At the start of this week I had a very bad formal observation that really knocked my confidence. The next day I taught another class which I thought was mediocre but not awful. Afterwards my mentor completely ripped it to shreds, saying it was an 'embarrassment', I'm not warm enough and my subject knowledge is poor. She also said that I was allowed one more lesson with them and if I don't do well, I won't be able to teach them anymore. I was completely humiliated, cried and dreaded seeing her again. Today I had some much better lessons but she made some more comments that I felt went beyond the objective into the personal. I have no problem with criticism, especially if it's constructive, but the way this was delivered just seemed mean.

    This experience made me think more closely about the doubts I was already having and I now feel that teaching may not be for me. I love working with young people but the workload, data, targets and 'teaching to the test' just make me feel depressed. I also have almost no time to see my family or boyfriend and I am concerned about my mental health which has been reasonably good for the past year or so after a lot of careful work.

    The thought of even doing a pretty boring job but having actual days off seems great right now but I am concerned about leaving mainly because of how it will look on a CV. I personally believe it's a good thing to quit something that you hate and you know you won't go anything further with, but I know employers might not feel the same. So I'm wondering what your experiences have been like?
    I know how you feel. I too am in PGCE madness right now. I am not considering quitting, but here I am on a Saturday night planning. Joy! I had a few lovely fantasies about winning the lottery today, but here is my take on it all.

    I can absolutely tell you that the grass is not greener on the other side. There are a million and one office based jobs out there that are as dull as dishwater. It is bearable for the first 16 years but after that it just aches. Since September, I haven't been bored once. This is the hardest I have ever worked in my life. I have been stressed, discovered what anxiety is, don't really see my family much and have been tired in ways I didn't know existed (having two young kids is a doddle by comparison). But here is the point - a bit of hard work never hurt anyone. We only have 5-6 more weeks to Christmas and then the worst is over. Placement B will be a complete contrast and a breath of fresh air and it is only two 6-7 week terms. Then Easter. By June it is all done! It will be over before you know it.

    Yes teaching is hard. Yes you are over worked and underpaid, but this will be the hardest year. All the planning we have to do doesn't exist next year - at least not to the same level of detail. And just think of all those wonderful holidays and time off. 20 days a year of which you have to take three for Christmas sucks. We get 13 weeks! That is three months a year off! It is the rough with the smooth so I say suck it up.

    Good luck!
 
 
 
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