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Are private schools worth the ££££? watch

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    (Original post by DeadEnd_96)
    No private schools are not worth it. I have two cousins who are both the same age. One of them studied at a private school, whilst the other studied at one of the worst performing comprehensive schools in the borough. However, both of them achieved A*A*AA in A level and they both ended up studying Medicine at Nottingham university. Now I ask you, was all that money really worth it?
    Hmm i agree, however the other cousin may have a different mentality/mindset/intellect than the other cousin even though they both got into Med. Your cousins were born to be perfect examples for this thread lol
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    (Original post by yung7up)
    Exactly! If a student is bright they would most likely achieve top grades in either situation and it does help the below average students. The environment is certainly beneficial in my opinion even though I don't go to a private school myself lol

    Yes, I agree. I definitely see why people send their children there, but I would never send my own. It doesn't seem right to be essentially buying your kids higher grades... and I don't think it does people any favours to only be socialising with a very small minority of the population who can afford the fees.

    That said, I am from a rural area in the East Midlands so there is less competition for state school places as there is in e.g. London. I've read that some people go to crazy lengths to secure places at decent state schools there, like renting a house near a good school for a year so that they're in the catchment area, which then pushes out some families who have lived in that area forever to have to go to schools miles away! How ridiculous. I would hate to live somewhere like that.
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    Reading this after paying off your child's school fees must be annoying af
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    It depends on

    - how good the private school is
    - how good the local state schools are
    - can your parents afford the fees
    - the individual child

    People who keep saying "I went to a state school/know XYZ who went to a state school and still got the same grades" just have a chip on their own shoulder about private schools. The reality is that the average student in a good private school will outperform the average school in a good-average-poor state school because there is better teaching, better facilities, better environment, more support, smaller classes, more opportunities for other extra circular activities.

    It's also pathetic that some people think that going to a private school means your grades magically appear. The private school kids are still learning the same material and sitting the same exams as a kid from a state school.

    For a lot of parents who have more than enough money to afford the tuition, I'm sure they see the money as well spent if they see it as a mitigation of the risk of a child potentially under performing in a less streamlined school.

    Imo where you see some private school educated kids struggle at Uni/work after studying is because they either had parents who pushed them (who wouldn't after spending a fortune on their education) and/or a school which created an environment to push the kids. When they go off to Uni with no one looking over their shoulder anymore, they lose that momentum that they got from elsewhere.
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    For me my parents didn't know what to do with me so they chucked me in a private school who they expected to essentially do everything (for what they should be doing, but didn't).
    I'm not sure if similar experience for others at all, whose parents hadn't gone through any education themselves.
    Ultimately it depends on the different trajectories of with and without the private school. I suppose its impossible to know how things would have turned out differently.
    I know my school didn't instill any sort of love of learning, and so wasn't a success in that way. But it did get me C's so I could go on to fail my AS levels and go to college afterwards, despite it looking like I was going to fail my GCSE's
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    (Original post by yung7up)
    Hmm i agree, however the other cousin may have a different mentality/mindset/intellect than the other cousin even though they both got into Med. Your cousins were born to be perfect examples for this thread lol
    Yes that is true. They did have completely different lifestyles as the cousin who studied at a private school had a great social life and would did a lot of extracurricular stuff. Nevertheless, the other cousin had no social life during his A levels. He would literally just study 24/7.
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    I suppose it's relative to how much money you have. Also worth noting that not all private schools are that great. I think it's outside of academics where the gap is really seen between state and private education. Private schools have the resources to provide opportunities in sports/music etc that state schools simply don't have.
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    (Original post by Zerforax)
    It depends on

    - how good the private school is
    - how good the local state schools are
    - can your parents afford the fees
    - the individual child

    People who keep saying "I went to a state school/know XYZ who went to a state school and still got the same grades" just have a chip on their own shoulder about private schools. The reality is that the average student in a good private school will outperform the average school in a good-average-poor state school because there is better teaching, better facilities, better environment, more support, smaller classes, more opportunities for other extra circular activities.

    It's also pathetic that some people think that going to a private school means your grades magically appear. The private school kids are still learning the same material and sitting the same exams as a kid from a state school.

    For a lot of parents who have more than enough money to afford the tuition, I'm sure they see the money as well spent if they see it as a mitigation of the risk of a child potentially under performing in a less streamlined school.

    Imo where you see some private school educated kids struggle at Uni/work after studying is because they either had parents who pushed them (who wouldn't after spending a fortune on their education) and/or a school which created an environment to push the kids. When they go off to Uni with no one looking over their shoulder anymore, they lose that momentum that they got from elsewhere.
    This sums up the whole debate in a nutshell! (a slightly large nutshell but nevertheless a nutshell)
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    I think it's worth the money, definitely - or at least the ones I went to were worth it.

    In terms of academics, it's certainly possible to do just as well at a state school. But I think attending a private school makes you more likely to really want to do well for yourself. You're in an environment in which academic achievements are considered to be very respectable (e.g. rather than something you're teased or bullied for), and in which most other people are very successful, which sets the competitive bar very high. It adds to a pupil's desire to succeed and gives them the confidence that they can. People can genuinely aspire to study the most competitive degrees at the top universities, because instead of thinking "that's just for Aspergic nerds, not for me", they think "well, all my friends are going so why shouldn't I?"

    Also, school and life in general aren't just about academics. I think the private schools I went to were great at giving us lots of opportunities to broaden our education and life experiences beyond just being exam machines. For example, rather than just visiting a local church, one Religious Studies trip was to the Vatican itself. Rather than just playing a Rugby match against the local rival school, the team travelled to Australia and New Zealand to compete against teams there. Members of the orchestras and drama societies have the opportunity from a young age, to regularly perform at venues such as the Symphony Hall in front of very large audience, so it's little surprise that they have no nerves when doing it at an older age. The school provides a vast array of facilities, activities and additional training to help the child reach their full potential in whatever their own personal area of interest might be; sports, music, drama, travel, arts, leadership and teamwork, public speaking or debating, programming, chess, you name it. It provides them with a really broad education, the opportunity to pursue whatever activity the they might thrive in, and the confidence to think that nothing is beyond them or out of their reach. Even if a pupil said "I want to be the Prime Minister when I'm older," he wouldn't be laughed at for living in a ridiculous dream world, he'd be told "okay, do it then".

    Having said that, it's up to the child to make full use of what is being made available to them. If they are the type of kid who literally just goes to school, sits in lessons, comes home and then gets average grades, then no it's probably not worth it because you can do that at any school. It's worth it for those who immerse themselves in everything the school has to offer.
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    If the student has it in them they will thrive in most environments (unless the school/college has been awarded a poor rating from Ofsted). If they have the drive and passion, more so thirst to become a success the only thing in their way is them self. Thats just my opinion anyway.
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    Being in one, I believe it depends on the student. Some kids are worth the bang, others just aren't.
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    (Original post by yung7up)
    Do you think you would have done much better at school/life if you went to a private school? Everyone says the standards are much higher, which is understandable considering the £££ being put in, but is it really? Just curious about everyone's views on private schools
    It depends on so many different things. Fees vary as does quality. I would answer GENERALLY as a firm 'yes', though.
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    (Original post by Imperion)
    Being in one, I believe it depends on the student. Some kids are worth the bang, others just aren't.
    Exactly how I feel at mine.
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    (Original post by ivybridge)
    Exactly how I feel at mine.
    Aye I feel like some students are better off in state schools, while some in state would be greater in private. However, this is primarily based around academic capabilities. If they excel in sports/art they can be given the chance as well. But hey, I'm a lowly scholar
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    (Original post by Johann von Gauss)
    Yeah, if you are too thick to get into a Grammar school, or there aren't any near you.

    Comprehensives are rubbish.
    Well it depends on what kind of a Comprehensive you go to. There's a massive range, from comprehensives in wealthy, middle class areas that are glorified grammar schools to bottom-tier, "special measures" comprehensives.
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    I think I would have done better at a private school, and it might have stopped me getting bullied out of intelligence (which wrecked my confidence!) - but I'm at med school now, so it didn't hinder me too much going to a state school
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    I go to a private and no, I don't recon it's worth it.
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    (Original post by Novascope)
    Considering I go to a university with many people who went to private schools while I went to a state school, I don't really see the point.

    If you don't mind me asking what Uni do you go? If it's good, then you are pretty lucky/talented. If it is average/lower, then your going with the few failures of private school- no offence.


    (Original post by simbasdragon)
    It's odd because numerous people at my state school got similar results to those at a good London private school. Yet those students were paying thousands a year and have come out with the same results as many at my school got for free. In this case, it seems a waste of money.

    But if you're not that bright, private school can probably intensely tutor and push you to get higher grades than you'd naturally be capable of.
    It's because those are not the top ones. I bet if you compare the average A*/A between your school and that private they could be as high as 80% or even higher at some while some state schools such as mines were at 2-3% with ABB lol. You are 100% correct though about pushing you however I believe at any level it can boost you at least 2-3 grades higher.
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    I went to a private school. Academically it was very strong, and I had a good experience, but I don't think it's necessary to go to such a school to get good grades or to be successful in life. If you are bright and ambitious almost any school would do. Where an "elite" school does make a difference sometimes is that you are surrounded by people who are aiming high (either themselves or their families!) and this can have a positive influence on your own expectations about yourself and your life, if that drive is not naturally there.
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    (Original post by Plagioclase)
    Well it depends on what kind of a Comprehensive you go to. There's a massive range, from comprehensives in wealthy, middle class areas that are glorified grammar schools to bottom-tier, "special measures" comprehensives.
    Agreed.

    Some schools are failing so bad while others are pretty damn good. I think depends on affluence of people in that area as you have already stated.

    However it's getting better IMO, lots of these failing schools in my area are dropping A-level and opting to be ONLY Btech. This allows people to have no choice but to go better schools for A-levels, only problem is lack of space.
 
 
 
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